How to grow Yeast
By: Singer Instruments How to grow / culture yeast on agar or in YPD: We show you how to prepare fresh cultures of yeast from previously grown agar plates. Spruce up your old yeast cultures by replating onto fresh media or liquid YPD, or select colonies of interest to be expanded. Find out more http://www.singerinstruments.com
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Wereldoorlog I : Werkbladen
Schermafbeelding_2011-05-20_om_08.47.21.png

In acht bladzijden wordt het verloop van de eerste wereldoorlog op een eenvoudige manier uitgelegd. Dit met behulp van de nodige kaarten en foto's.


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5.3 Event-related potentials

When a sense organ (eye, ear, etc.) receives a stimulus, the event eventually causes neurons to ‘fire’ (i.e. produce electrical discharges) in the receiving area of the brain. The information is sent on from these first sites to other brain areas. With appropriate apparatus and techniques it is possible to record the electrical signals, using electrodes attached to the scalp. The electrical potentials recorded are called event-related potentials (ERPs), since they dependably f
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4.2 The effects of irrelevant speech

Imagine watching a computer screen, on which a series of digits is flashed, at a nice easy rate of one per second. After six items you have to report what the digits had been, in the order presented (this is called serial recall). Not a very difficult task, you might think, but what if someone were talking nearby? It turns out that, even when participants are instructed to ignore the speech completely, their recall performance drops by at least 30 per cent (Jones, 1999).

In the context
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3.4 The ‘flanker’ effect

A potential problem for the feature integration theory is the fact that the time taken to understand the meaning of a printed word can be influenced by other, nearby words. Of itself, this is not surprising, because it is well known that one word can prime (i.e. speed decisions to) another related word; the example nurse – doctor was given in Section 1.4. However, Shaffer and LaBerge (1979) found priming effects, even when t
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2.1 Introduction

I introduced Section 1 by suggesting that the auditory system had a special problem: unlike the visual system, it needed processes which would permit a listener to attend to a specific set of sounds without being confused by the overlap of other, irrelevant noises. The implication of that line of argument was that vision had no need of any such system. However, although we do not see simultaneously everything that surrounds us, we can certainly see more than one thing at a time. Earlie
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1.5 Summary of Section 1

The auditory system is able to process sounds in such a way that, although several may be present simultaneously, it is possible to focus upon the message of interest. However, in experiments on auditory attention, there have been contradictory results concerning the fate of the unattended material:

  • The auditory system processes mixed sounds in such a way that it is possible to focus upon a single wanted message.

  • Unattended material a
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1.4 Eavesdropping on the unattended message

It was not long before researchers devised more complex ways of testing Broadbent's theory of attention, and it soon became clear that it could not be entirely correct. Even in the absence of formal experiments, common experiences might lead one to question the theory. An oft-cited example is the cocktail party effect. Imagine you are attending a noisy party, but your auditory location system is working wonderfully, enabling you to focus upon one particular conversation. Suddenly, from
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1.3 Attending to sounds

From the earlier sections, you will appreciate that the auditory system is able to separate different, superimposed sounds on the basis of their different source directions. This makes it possible to attend to any one sound without confusion, and we have the sensation of moving our ‘listening attention’ to focus on the desired sound. For example, as I write this I can listen to the quiet hum of the computer in front of me, or swing my attention to the bird song outside the window to
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1.2 Disentangling sounds

If you are still feeling aggrieved about the shortcomings of evolution, then you might take heart from the remarkable way in which the auditory system has evolved so as to avoid a serious potential problem. Unlike our eyes, our ears cannot be directed so as to avoid registering material that we wish to ignore; whatever sounds are present in the environment, we must inevitably be exposed to them. In a busy setting such as a party we are swamped by simultaneous sounds – people in different pa
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Myasthenia Gravis - Cranial Nerves Exam - Facial Nerve (CN VII) Sub-exam - Patient 11
Patient is a 52-year-old African American male who initially presented with diplopia and dysphagia about five years ago. Serologic testing demonstrated antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor, and repetitive nerve stimulation testing showed a decrement in CMAP at slow frequency repetitive stimulation. He now presents with generalized myasthenia, dysarthria, dysphagia and diplopia during a pyridostigmine-holiday for Tensilon testing.
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The Giggler Treatment Quiz 2
The pupils will reflect on the content of chapters 3 to 8. They will deepen their understanding of the content.
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Up Close with a Zapotec Urn
This article is part of OLogy, where kids can collect virtual trading cards and create projects with them. Here, they learn more about the Zapotec people of ancient Mexico.
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3.4 Moon36: Apollo 12 station 2

Pete Conrad took this pan early in EVA-1 from a position due west of the Lunar Module. Al Bean can be seen in several frames taking documentation photos of the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) that he has just deployed. (QuickTime, 500KB, note: this may take some time to download depending on your connection speed)

Combotronic: -s- (Interactive Game)
Combotronics teaches players to build words by combining word parts. Players are challenged to make as many words as possible. The goal for this game is letter sound -s-.
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International Donkey Project at UMass
Donkeys have been called the world¹s most important work animals, but it¹s unusual for pre-veterinary students to get hands-on experience with them. The UMass Amherst International Donkey Project is one of the only programs in the nation where undergraduate veterinary and animal science students can learn about donkey health and care, and conduct original reproductive research in a modern clinical facility. Students started the UMass Donkey Club to spend more time with donkeys and enhance thei
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Husky Mini Reels: Sports Balls
Promo for Husky Sports History in the library. Huskyreels.org
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Ricardo Porro Lecture
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Northwest PRECEDENT: If They Are So Special, Why Can't They Get Dental Care?
Watch a discussion of a study to investigate training, beliefs, and practice patterns regarding treating child and adult patients with mild to moderate special health care needs. View the series online at: http://www.uwtv.org/video/series.aspx?id=22826181
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COLORS- What is Your Favorite Color?
This is a video presents simple vocabulary and the colors.  The sentences describing the color of the object appear on the screen. People on the street are interviewed about  “what’s your favorite color”. Good diversity of cultures shown in the interviews. Good for older ELL students. (9:31)
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