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Acknowledgements

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Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

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7 Review of unit learning outcomes

After studying this unit, you should be able to:

  • explain how Acts of Parliament originate:

    • party manifestos, national emergency or crisis, Royal Commissions, the Law Commission, Private Members' Bills

  • discuss the process by which rules become law and the role of Parliament in making legal rules:

    • first reading, second reading, committee sta
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6.2 Summary of Part E

In Part E you have studied:

  • the nature of pressure groups;

  • their composition;

  • how they operate;

  • examples of successful pressure groups;

  • the strengths and weaknesses of pressure groups.

5.2 Summary of Part D

In Part D you have:

  • examined how to read an Act of Parliament;

  • studied the physical layout of Acts of Parliament and identified those features common to all Acts of Parliament;

  • read sections of the Law Reform (Year and a Day Rule) Act 1996 and the Crime and Disorder Act 1998;

  • examined the importance of Schedules and the short statement at the beginning of the Act;

  • studied the language
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4.15 Summary of Part C

In Part C you have learnt that:

  • delegated legislation is law made by bodies other than Parliament, but with the authority of Parliament delegated in an enabling or parent Act

  • the types of delegated legislation are:

    • Statutory Instruments

    • byelaws

    • Orders in Council

    • Court Rule committees

    • professional regulations


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4.14 Conclusion

Although there are advantages in delegated legislation, the disadvantages all concern the issue of accountability because delegated legislation takes law making away from the democratically elected House of Commons.

These concerns about accountability were heightened by the introduction of the Legislative and Regulatory Reform Bill 2006. The Bill contained proposals that would enable Ministers to introduce orders to amend, repeal or replace any legislation. It was seen by some people as
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4.13.4 Volume

The large volume of delegated legislation produced every year (some 3,000 SIs annually) means that it is very difficult for Members of Parliament, let alone the general public, to keep up to date with the present law. This is exacerbated by the fact that delegated legislation is made in private, unlike Acts of Parliament which are made following public debates in Parliament.

4.13.2 Sub-delegation

Connected to the accountability issue is the problem that the authority vested in Parliament to make law is delegated away from Parliament, possibly through a number of ‘layers’, for example, to a Government minister and then to a department and then possibly again to a group of experts. The Trafalgar Square byelaw (see Activity 9) was made by The Mayor of London acting on behalf of the Greater London Authority.


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4.13.1 Democratic accountability

The main criticism of delegated legislation is that it takes law making away from the democratically elected House of Commons. Instead, power to make law is given to unelected civil servants and experts working under the supervision of a Government minister.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should:

  • be able to describe the relationship between social work practice and the law;

  • understand the legal framework that regulates social work in Scotland;

  • have an awareness of the role of law in countering discrimination.

SSPD_Chapter 6_Part 7_Device Simulation2_concluded
Bijay_Kumar Sharma
SSPD_Chapter 6_Part 7_Device Simulation 2 is concluded in this module.
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Junior Chemistry: Compounds 1
Junior Chemistry: Compounds 1 - Learn about Junior Chemistry, Compounds 1. The video quality is not the best, but the instructor is very knowledgeable about his subject. (The video starts out dark, but then the instructor moves to a lighter area.) Instructor uses a whiteboard for instruction. (05:25)
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Global Concerns of National Importance for the Next U.S. Administration
“I’ve drunk kava in the South Pacific and rubbed noses with natives,” says William Fallon. “I’ve enjoyed tender baby camel as a delicacy. I’ve met presidents, kings, prime ministers and many ordinary folks. I’ve done a lot of things. That was yesterday. What matters is today and tomorrow.” Now, says Fallon, is the time for a
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1.2.2 Thermoplastics and thermosets

As already stated, polymers including rigid plastics were first developed in the last century from natural precursors. The sealing wax employed by the Victorians, for example, was usually based on the natural polymer shellac, an exudate of the Indian lac insect. Shellac is an early natural thermoplastic – defined as a material which softens and hardens reversibly on heating and cooling. In theory these reversible physical changes will take place without a corresponding change in the chemica
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References

Checkland, P. (1981) Systems Thinking, Systems Practice, Chichester, Wiley.

Transparent, Opaque and Translucent Objects
A sorting activity for children involving transparent, opaque and translucent materials. Simpler terminology/vocabulary may also be used.
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Floating and Sinking 1
Printable worksheet that works through a hands-on exploration of floating and sinking. Introduces the practice of recording ideas and observations.
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Acknowledgements

The following material is Proprietary and is used under licence:

Text

Various pages: Arup, O., material accessed in January 2002 and December 2000, from.

Box 1: Inman, P. ‘Chaotic scheme that left families relying on food parcels’, The Guardian, 6 July 2005. © Guardian News and Media Ltd 2005.

Box 2: ‘Fly-away drones put robot air force
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5.3 The rebound effect
Access to safe, clean and sustainable energy supplies is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity during the twenty-first century. This unit will survey the world’s present energy systems and their sustainability problems, together with some of the possible solutions to those problems and how these might emerge in practice.
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