PediNeuroLogic Exam: Newborn: Normal: Tone - Heel to Ear
Holding the baby's foot in one hand, draw the leg towards the ear to see how much resistance there is to the maneuver. The foot should go to about the level of the chest or shoulder, but not all the way to the ear. If the foot can be drawn to the ear then there is hypotonia. A neuroscience tutorial focusing on those aspects of the pediatric neurological examination that are unique to the child's nervous system, with an emphasis on important neurodevelopmental milestones.
Author(s): Paul D. Larsen, MD,Suzanne S. Stensaas, PhD

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Prepositions of Time and Place
Gayle Griggs
One common problem that English as a Second Language (ESL) learners have is using the correct prepositions of time and place both orally and in written text. This instructional module focuses on […]

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Nokia's Windows of opportunity?
July 4 - It's five months since Nokia announced a partnership with Microsoft but the Finnish giant's share price is still struggling. Reuters asks what now for Nokia? Tim Hart reports.
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Rats replace doctors in pioneering disease diagnosis
Send in rats to prevent the spread of a deadly disease? The idea seems like a contradiction in terms, but a team of Johnson & Johnson executives and MBA participants took the Blue Ocean Strategy to a new dimension for their imaginative solution to reducing tuberculosis cases.
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5.11 Vibrating air column: standing waves in a conical tube
How do different instruments produce the sounds we classify as music? How do we decide whether something – a piano, a vacuum cleaner – is actually a musical instrument? In this unit we investigate the way vibrations and sound waves are harnessed to create music.
Author(s): The Open University

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5.10 Vibrating air column: end effects
How do different instruments produce the sounds we classify as music? How do we decide whether something – a piano, a vacuum cleaner – is actually a musical instrument? In this unit we investigate the way vibrations and sound waves are harnessed to create music.
Author(s): The Open University

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5.9 Vibrating air column: standing waves in a cylindrical tube closed at one end
How do different instruments produce the sounds we classify as music? How do we decide whether something – a piano, a vacuum cleaner – is actually a musical instrument? In this unit we investigate the way vibrations and sound waves are harnessed to create music.
Author(s): The Open University

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5.8 Vibrating air column: standing waves in a cylindrical tube open at both ends
How do different instruments produce the sounds we classify as music? How do we decide whether something – a piano, a vacuum cleaner – is actually a musical instrument? In this unit we investigate the way vibrations and sound waves are harnessed to create music.
Author(s): The Open University

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5.7 Vibrating air column: reflection at the end of an air column
How do different instruments produce the sounds we classify as music? How do we decide whether something – a piano, a vacuum cleaner – is actually a musical instrument? In this unit we investigate the way vibrations and sound waves are harnessed to create music.
Author(s): The Open University

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5.7.1 Mixed oxidant gases system
Without it we are dead! Water is essential, but what processes must it go through to become fit for human consumption? This unit will guide you through the continuous cycling of water between land, open water surfaces and the sea before moving on to an overview of the water treatment and supply process.
Author(s): The Open University

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21.07.2011 – Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten
Trainieren Sie Ihr Hörverstehen mit authentischen Materialien. Nutzen Sie die Nachrichten der Deutschen Welle von Donnerstag – als Text und als verständlich gesprochene Audio-Datei. *** Bundesaußenminister Guido Westerwelle hat die Präsentation eines konkreten Zeitplans für den Abzug der Bundeswehr aus Afghanistan abgelehnt. Es sei unklug zu sagen, wo und in welchem Monat welche Truppenteile reduziert würden, sagte der FDP-Politiker zu Beginn eines Afghanistan-Besuchs in Kabul. Ein solch
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Irish unions seek a soft landing to harsh economic measures
Could a consolidated EU financial administration mean an end to draconian bailout repayment terms? Ireland’s Union leader thinks so…
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3.2 Search engines and subject gateways
The internet provides a world of information, but how do you find what you are looking for? This unit will help you discover the meaning of information quality and teach you how to evaluate the material you come across in your study of technology. You will learn how to plan your searches effectively and be able to experiment with some of the key resources in this area.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.7 The story so far

This section looked at the play Last Call. The play is very rich in ethical issues, and one of the most interesting points that are made is that, whilst there are many ‘big’ ethical questions worthy of discussion and investigation, it seems to be in the everyday, routine conversations and dealings of people that ethical questions get to be asked and answered, even if this is not clearly recognised.

A major ethical issue tackled in the play is loyalty: giving preference i
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Brain Break (Stretching)
Great to do for a break from classroom activity learning. Stretching with slow paced music. The video is 5 min. 01 seconds in length. A stretching exercise that is presented slowly and is easy for students to follow.
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Environmental History Timeline
Students develop critical thinking skills by interviewing a person who has perspective on environmental history. Students explore the concept of a timeline, including historical milestones, and develop a sense of the context of events.
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STS.007 Technology in History (MIT)
Today many people assume that technological change is the major factor in historical change and that it tends to lead to historical progress. This class turns these assumptions into a question—what is the role of technology in history?—by focusing on four key historical transitions: the human revolution (the emergence of humans as a history-making species), the Neolithic Revolution (the emergence of agriculture-based civilizations); the great leap in productivity (also known as the industria
Author(s): Williams, Rosalind

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

World War II - Quiz
Six questions to see how much you know about the Second World War
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Farm Accounts - Quiz
How much do you know about Farm Accounts?
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