1.2 Note taking

Different ways of note taking include:

  1. Re-writing:

    Here, the rewording of main parts in a unit or article is undertaken. The advantage of this method is that you have thought about course concepts and ideas, and put them into your own words. Here you are summarising points and trying to do this concisely. This does not mean copying directly from the text (unless it is a short quotation you have referenced and chosen to illustrate a point)
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1.2 What’s in this unit?

As you have probably realised from reading this far, there are also other aspects to the unit. We will have a look at these in a moment.

This unit is divided into five sections including this introduction. Each section encourages you to see how learning can underpin personal change.

Section 1 (this section) – Introduction. This section introduces the unit. It gives you an idea of how the unit is structured and what approaches to learning and change it takes.

Section 2 –
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Introduction

This unit will facilitate your own exploration of key environmental, social and economic threats that will converge to challenge communities in the near future. You will be required to develop this exploration according to three modes of modelling and Author(s): No creator set

Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns
Can a theory that explains why successful organizations fail and newcomers prevail help turn around America’s public schools? Michael B. Horn describes how the idea of disruptive innovation, developed by management researcher and author Clayton M. Christensen, can provide a fresh perspective on struggling education systems
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4 Conclusion
Disney and Google are just two companies renowned for their ‘business culture’. Have you ever wondered why the company you work for is different from others? This unit explores how the concept of culture developed to the point where it is now possible to see and (feel) the difference between companies.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Symbols within business
Disney and Google are just two companies renowned for their ‘business culture’. Have you ever wondered why the company you work for is different from others? This unit explores how the concept of culture developed to the point where it is now possible to see and (feel) the difference between companies.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.1 Culture as socialisation
Disney and Google are just two companies renowned for their ‘business culture’. Have you ever wondered why the company you work for is different from others? This unit explores how the concept of culture developed to the point where it is now possible to see and (feel) the difference between companies.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 Working abroad
Disney and Google are just two companies renowned for their ‘business culture’. Have you ever wondered why the company you work for is different from others? This unit explores how the concept of culture developed to the point where it is now possible to see and (feel) the difference between companies.
Author(s): The Open University

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Business cultures
Disney and Google are just two companies renowned for their ‘business culture’. Have you ever wondered why the company you work for is different from others? This unit explores how the concept of culture developed to the point where it is now possible to see and (feel) the difference between companies.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

1.4 Defining reflection
How do we learn? Understanding ‘how’ is the key to learning more effectively. This unit looks at the three main categories of theories: the acquisitive, constructivist and experiential models of learning. There is no right way to learn but developing an active approach will ensure that you are open to new ideas.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.3 Reflection and course study
How do we learn? Understanding ‘how’ is the key to learning more effectively. This unit looks at the three main categories of theories: the acquisitive, constructivist and experiential models of learning. There is no right way to learn but developing an active approach will ensure that you are open to new ideas.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

1.1 Effective course study
How do we learn? Understanding ‘how’ is the key to learning more effectively. This unit looks at the three main categories of theories: the acquisitive, constructivist and experiential models of learning. There is no right way to learn but developing an active approach will ensure that you are open to new ideas.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Introduction
How do we learn? Understanding ‘how’ is the key to learning more effectively. This unit looks at the three main categories of theories: the acquisitive, constructivist and experiential models of learning. There is no right way to learn but developing an active approach will ensure that you are open to new ideas.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2.6 Different types of ‘average’
Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Speculation and the development of new theories are crucial as well, but ultimately the predictions resulting from those theories have to be tested against what actually happens and this can only be done by making further measurements. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisio
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2.5 How likely are particular results?
Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Speculation and the development of new theories are crucial as well, but ultimately the predictions resulting from those theories have to be tested against what actually happens and this can only be done by making further measurements. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisio
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2.4 Using a calculator for statistical calculations
Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Speculation and the development of new theories are crucial as well, but ultimately the predictions resulting from those theories have to be tested against what actually happens and this can only be done by making further measurements. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisio
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2.3 Mean and standard deviation for repeated measurements
Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Speculation and the development of new theories are crucial as well, but ultimately the predictions resulting from those theories have to be tested against what actually happens and this can only be done by making further measurements. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisio
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2.2 The distribution of repeated measurements
Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Speculation and the development of new theories are crucial as well, but ultimately the predictions resulting from those theories have to be tested against what actually happens and this can only be done by making further measurements. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisio
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

2.2.1 Repeated measurements
Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Speculation and the development of new theories are crucial as well, but ultimately the predictions resulting from those theories have to be tested against what actually happens and this can only be done by making further measurements. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisio
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2