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4.3 Framing the problem

As you saw in Activity 1, how a problem is framed can have a significant effect on how you make decisions. Medical decisions can be affected by whether outcomes are framed as likelihood of deaths or of saving patients. Financial decisions can be affected by whether you see yourself in a position of loss or gain. In a position of gain we tend to become risk averse; in a position of loss we will tend to take risks to avoid or recover losses. You may know people who are good at using this
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions).This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

This extract is taken from D315: Crime, order and social control, produced by the BBC on behalf of the Open University.

© 2007
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6.10 To extend or include?

Whatever kind of system you intend to develop, you will need to consider its security. Usually, we allow only trustworthy people to use a new system. Therefore, in a software solution we can envisage a log-on use case, which describes how a user gains access through some authentication procedure. How should such a requirement be included in the example of the hotel chain?

By analogy with natural languages, the UML allows a number of ‘grammatically correct’ options each of which will
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3.8.2 Analysing and answering essay-based exam questions

For the following activity, you can use questions from a specimen paper, past papers or even questions you have devised for yourself.

Activity 9

Exam questions for essay-based courses often contain 'process words'. These require you t
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2.4.2 Knowledge

Learning is often associated with ‘knowing facts’. You may associate this sort of learning with what you did at school where you might have thought that you had to learn lots of facts associated with a subject in order to pass an examination. Evidence of learning is sometimes linked to building up an increasingly impressive store of such facts. TV quiz programmes tend to make us think that learning is about knowing more facts than other people.

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2.3 Why it’s important to be a learner

We hope that you will go along with the suggestion that learning permeates most, if not all, aspects of our lives. The quote that follows is from Peter Jarvis, an academic who has spent many years trying to set out why learning is so important. In the opening to a recent book he suggests:

Described image
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1.3 Learning through activities

The unit has been designed to actively involve you in your own learning. One of the most important aspects of this are the activities that you are asked to do.

For each activity, there is a suggested time, for example, ‘Allow about 10 minutes for this activity’. These estimates are intended to give you a sense of the amount of effort required. However, you may find that you spend longer on each activity. That is fine, so long as you feel you are learning. If you come across ideas th
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Introduction

The activities in this unit are designed to support an individual or group of teachers in preparing a school-based training session for colleagues on creativity and information and communications technology (ICT) in the curriculum.


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Acknowledgements

Author Details

This unit was prepared for TeachandLearn.net by John Morgan. John works at Bristol University where he teaches on the geography PGCE course. Before that he taught geography in schools and colleges. He is the co-author of Essential AS Geography (2000) Nelson Thornes and Teaching to Learn Geography (forthcoming) RoutledgeFalmer.

Other acknowledgements

T
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7.6 Conclusion

This extract has emphasised the importance of becoming familiar with the framework of learning outcomes within which your progress would be assessed.

It is imperative for you to be an active learner and take responsibility for what you want and need to get out of your studies. You willl achieve this through reflection on the process of your practice learning experiences and feedback from those involved in assessing your progress.


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2.1 Introduction

Before making judgements about the value of play, it is important to be clear about how we define ‘play’. Is play unstructured exploration of the immediate environment? Does participating in a board game count as play? Does a baby's exploration of a treasure basket count as play? Are children playing when they share rude jokes in the playground? Are children playing when they act out a scene from Roman life in assembly? In the next activity you have the opportunity to identify those activ
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Solving Large Sparse Linear Systems: The Exascale Challenge
Iaian Duff STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory November 1, 2012
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Valpo Christmas with Art Chumley
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Chair for Afternoon Session

Li-Huei Tsai, recorded 12/5/12


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1 Introduction

The document attached below includes the table of contents and first section of Mountain building in Scotland. In this section, you will find the following subsections:

  • Table of contents

  • 1.1 Setting the scene

  • 1.2 Recognizing ancient mountains

  • 1.3 Orogeny through geological time

    • 1.3.1 Geological time: a brief note

    • 1.3.2 Disentangling the cont
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5.2 Frequency code

Although the evidence for the place theory of frequency coding is compelling, there is some question as to whether the tuning curves obtained from neurons in the auditory nerve provide a mechanism for frequency discrimination that is fine enough to account for behavioural data. People can detect remarkably small differences in frequency – in some cases as small as 3 Hz (for a 1000 Hz signal at moderate intensity). What accounts for this ability? As early as 1930, the American experimental p
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4.5.1 Surfaces with holes

Using this result, we can obtain the Euler characteristic of a surface with any number of holes by successively inserting the holes one at a time. For example, since a closed disc has Euler characteristic 1, it follows that a closed disc with 1 hole has Euler characteristic 0, a disc with 2 holes has Euler characteristic −1, and so on.


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4.5 Some general results

We next establish some general results about Euler characteristics. We start with a theorem that tells us what happens to the Euler characteristic of a surface when we remove an open disc.

Theorem 10: Disc Removal Theorem

The Euler characteristic of a surface with an open disc removed is one le
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3.1 Surfaces with twists

In Section 3 we study the orientability of surfaces from an informal point of view. In particular, we take a detailed look at the projective plane and its properties. We start by examining some surfaces that resemble a Möbius band.

A cylinder or a Möbius band can be formed by gluing together the ends of a rectangular strip or band of paper either with or without twisting the paper before gluing. Does adding further twists to the band before gluing provide any more examples of surfaces
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