3.13.1 General

OU Knowledge Network, ‘Guidelines for describing visual teaching material’ http://kn.open.ac.uk/ public/ index.cfm?wpid=2709

US National Public Website on Assistive Technology


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3.12 Activity task 6: solutions to challenging activities

Return to your list of the challenging activities, which you updated in ‘Discussing disability’.

Add notes on possible solutions to as many of the challenges as you can.

You might like to share your ideas in the Comments section below and discuss the similarities and differences.


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3.3 Visual impairment

There are approximately two million people in the UK who have a sight problem. The Royal National Institute of the Blind (RNIB) defines someone as having a sight problem if they are unable to recognise someone across the road or they have difficulty reading newsprint even when wearing glasses (RNIB, 2005, ‘About sight loss – changing the way we think about blindness’).

When discussing visually impaired people it is important to distinguish between partially sighted people (also kn
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6 Communicating and OpenLearn

A variety of software tools are available to help you communicate with others to rework content and to enable your learners to work with each other. As well as Compendium, the mind mapping tool described in Activity 3, FlashMeeting enables video-conferencing through a web browser, and the Comments allow asynchronous discussion
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1.3.2 Exploring other activities

After trying Activity 3 you may want to explore some of the other resources given or even develop your own, in which case the Global Dimension section of the ASE site or the New Scientist online may be helpful starting points.

One way of bringing global science into the classroom is by using ‘off-the-shelf’ activities that:

  • exemplify curriculum content – for example, iron was extracted from its ore in a precursor of the blast furn
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1.1 Teaching languages: language awareness

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2 Book reviews

The comments below all relate to the same book, Ruby Holler by Sharon Creech, and have been made by pupils at Churchill Community School, North Somerset – the ‘Churchill Chatterboxes’.

A captivating yet far-fetched book, I feel this would suit most younger readers but older readers would want something more demanding. (Margaret)

I think Ruby Holler is a very moving book, especially when Da
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • engage in debates on different views of creativity and form a view on what creativity means;

  • recognise the ways in which individuals can be creators and generators of new knowledge;

  • explore ways in which ICT creates new opportunities for creative, collaborative activity.


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1 Visions of geography: an introduction

In considering the image which best reflects your ‘vision’ of geography, perhaps it is the volcano, which is a testament to the ‘awe and wonder’ of the natural world? Or is your vision to help young people make sense of the gross inequalities that exist in the world?

Geography teaching is also about providing young people with the skills that help them fit into the demands of an increasingly globalised economy. There is the argument that geography teaching is at its best when it
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5.2 Before the visit

In preparation for the visit the tutor will need to:

  • Telephone the school to agree a date and time with the mentor and school co-ordinator for the visit.

  • Write to the school confirming the visit. This letter should:

     

    1. set out the tasks and activities the mentor will need to do;

    2. request that a focus for the observation is agreed with the student teacher and mentor;


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1.4.5 M is for Method

Method is about the way in which a piece of information is produced. This is quite a complex area as different types of information are produced in different ways. These are a few suggestions to look out for:

Opinions – A lot of information is based on the opinion of individuals. They may or not be experts in their field (see P for Provenance) but the key message is to be clear that it is just an opinion and must be valued as such.

Research – You don’t have t
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1.4.1 PROMPT

There is so much information available on the internet on every topic imaginable. But how do you know if it is any good? And if you find a lot more information than you really need, how do you decide what to keep and who to discard?

In this section we are going to introduce a simple checklist to help you to judge the quality of the information you find. Before we do this, spend a few minutes thinking about what is meant by information quality.

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1.3.11 Statistics

There is a lot of statistical data on the internet relating to education.


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3 Foreign communication

In this section you will see how fluency in a foreign language is not necessary in order to communicate.

Activity 10 Everyday languages

You should allow 10 minutes

Think about where and when you
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1 Languages in the world

This section aims to make you aware of a world beyond your current sphere of knowledge.

Activity 1 English in the world

You should allow 5 minutes

Where is English spoken as an official language
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Varios estudiantes de Bellas Artes

Actividad 3

En esta actividad va a escuchar a varios estudiantes de Bellas Artes explicar lo que es para ellos el arte.

1 Como se trata de una conversación informal en la que los participantes se interrumpen mutuamente, emp
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4.12 The implications of gender differences in communication

Activity 20

0 hours 20 minutes

If it were true that men and women tend to communicate in very different ways, what might be the implications for health and social care in terms of:<
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2.8 ‘Difference’, power and discrimination

These first few sections have emphasised the point that differences are always produced in a social context, and that a key part of that context is power relationships. As pointed out earlier, a key element of Foucault’s social constructionist approach is that the way in which people are categorised in society (for example, by gender, ethnicity or age) involves an exercise of power that reflects the ideas and interests of dominant groups. One of the key arguments against essentialist views
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

Knowledge

  • distinguish between parenthood and parenting;

  • outline some of the reasons why parenting may require support from outside the immediate family;

  • demonstrate how individual, environmental and structural factors can have an impact on parenting;

  • challenge the notion that ‘problem’ parents and ‘problem’ families can be readily identified.

Skills
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Introduction

In the changing world of family life, parenting itself has come under closer examination. How important is quality parenting, who judges it, and is its provision the sole responsibility of parents – should parents just be left to get on with it? This unit explores what parenting actually means, what is meant by quality parenting, how it can be enhanced and promoted, and how services intended to promote quality parenting can be strengthened.

While working through this unit, you will be
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UK National Statistics This website contains an extensive range of official UK statistics and information about statistics. Under browse by theme there is an education and training subheading.