Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • engage in debates on different views of creativity and form a view on what creativity means;

  • recognise the ways in which individuals can be creators and generators of new knowledge;

  • explore ways in which ICT creates new opportunities for creative, collaborative activity.


Author(s): The Open University

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1 Visions of geography: an introduction

In considering the image which best reflects your ‘vision’ of geography, perhaps it is the volcano, which is a testament to the ‘awe and wonder’ of the natural world? Or is your vision to help young people make sense of the gross inequalities that exist in the world?

Geography teaching is also about providing young people with the skills that help them fit into the demands of an increasingly globalised economy. There is the argument that geography teaching is at its best when it
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5.2 Before the visit

In preparation for the visit the tutor will need to:

  • Telephone the school to agree a date and time with the mentor and school co-ordinator for the visit.

  • Write to the school confirming the visit. This letter should:

     

    1. set out the tasks and activities the mentor will need to do;

    2. request that a focus for the observation is agreed with the student teacher and mentor;


      Author(s): The Open University

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1.4.5 M is for Method

Method is about the way in which a piece of information is produced. This is quite a complex area as different types of information are produced in different ways. These are a few suggestions to look out for:

Opinions – A lot of information is based on the opinion of individuals. They may or not be experts in their field (see P for Provenance) but the key message is to be clear that it is just an opinion and must be valued as such.

Research – You don’t have t
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1.4.1 PROMPT

There is so much information available on the internet on every topic imaginable. But how do you know if it is any good? And if you find a lot more information than you really need, how do you decide what to keep and who to discard?

In this section we are going to introduce a simple checklist to help you to judge the quality of the information you find. Before we do this, spend a few minutes thinking about what is meant by information quality.

Author(s): The Open University

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1.3.11 Statistics

There is a lot of statistical data on the internet relating to education.


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3 Foreign communication

In this section you will see how fluency in a foreign language is not necessary in order to communicate.

Activity 10 Everyday languages

You should allow 10 minutes

Think about where and when you
Author(s): The Open University

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1 Languages in the world

This section aims to make you aware of a world beyond your current sphere of knowledge.

Activity 1 English in the world

You should allow 5 minutes

Where is English spoken as an official language
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Varios estudiantes de Bellas Artes

Actividad 3

En esta actividad va a escuchar a varios estudiantes de Bellas Artes explicar lo que es para ellos el arte.

1 Como se trata de una conversación informal en la que los participantes se interrumpen mutuamente, emp
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4.12 The implications of gender differences in communication

Activity 20

0 hours 20 minutes

If it were true that men and women tend to communicate in very different ways, what might be the implications for health and social care in terms of:<
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2.8 ‘Difference’, power and discrimination

These first few sections have emphasised the point that differences are always produced in a social context, and that a key part of that context is power relationships. As pointed out earlier, a key element of Foucault’s social constructionist approach is that the way in which people are categorised in society (for example, by gender, ethnicity or age) involves an exercise of power that reflects the ideas and interests of dominant groups. One of the key arguments against essentialist views
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

Knowledge

  • distinguish between parenthood and parenting;

  • outline some of the reasons why parenting may require support from outside the immediate family;

  • demonstrate how individual, environmental and structural factors can have an impact on parenting;

  • challenge the notion that ‘problem’ parents and ‘problem’ families can be readily identified.

Skills
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Introduction

In the changing world of family life, parenting itself has come under closer examination. How important is quality parenting, who judges it, and is its provision the sole responsibility of parents – should parents just be left to get on with it? This unit explores what parenting actually means, what is meant by quality parenting, how it can be enhanced and promoted, and how services intended to promote quality parenting can be strengthened.

While working through this unit, you will be
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

After studying this Unit you should be able to:

  • demonstrate your understanding of how social welfare policy started to evolve at a national level after World War II;

  • locate information relevant to social welfare through reference to a range of sources;

  • evaluate the reliability of information from different sources.


Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

In this unit we explore questions of access to community services. To make what might be quite a dry task more challenging we use a fictionalised case study of two people for whom access to community services is particularly problematic. Jim and Marianne are both long-term heroin addicts. Additional problems associated with their addiction are homelessness and physical illness. Their situation raises both practical questions, about how services can be accessed, and moral questions, about enti
Author(s): The Open University

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References

Ariès, P. (1976) Western Attitudes Towards Death, Marion Boyars, London.
Cartwright, A., Hockey, L. and Anderson, J. (1973) Life before Death, Routledge and Kegan Paul, London.
Dinnage, R. (1990) The Ruffian on the Stair: Reflections on Death, Viking, London.
Fenwick, P. and Fenwick, E. (1996) ‘The near-death
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1.3.2 Recurrent themes

When the accounts of people who have described a near-death experience are looked at side by side it is possible to identify some common features. This isn’t to say that all of these features are present in every account, but that amidst variations there are certainly recurrent themes. The following list is compiled from a variety of studies, including the important study undertaken by Sabom (1982), himself initially sceptical.


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1.5.5 The modern day relationship

However, things have been changing since Stein outlined the doctor-nurse game. A more recent study in Sweden reported that:

In our investigation, the nurses who had been working for 15–20 years often emphasised that it was during the past 8–10 years that marked changes had occurred in their interplay with doctors. Relations in former times are described in terms such as: ‘one had to stand on tiptoe’, ‘the
Author(s): The Open University

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1.4.1 Taking on a role

You can only succeed with a projection of yourself which other people are prepared to accept. And you then have to play out the scene the way others in the situation expect it to be played.

Reg and Glenda did not start their opening scene from nothing. They were working within widely shared understanding of home help work, which views it as version of ‘housework’. Cleaning and shopping are seen as traditional ‘women’s work’ – low in status, poorly paid and weakly defined in
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5.6 A few final thoughts

You will have seen from this section that it is difficult to talk about the heart without also talking about blood and veins and arteries. It is hard to isolate one body system or one body part and describe it by itself, without talking about other parts of the body as well. One of the important points that we would like you to remember about the biology of the human body is that everything is interlinked. An athlete hoping to maximise their performance in a sport has to work on all pa
Author(s): The Open University

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UK National Statistics This website contains an extensive range of official UK statistics and information about statistics. Under browse by theme there is an education and training subheading.