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Wilson, J. (1998) ‘Hamilton child safety cu
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4 Taking the point: identifying key ideas

As earlier activities have demonstrated, active reading and note taking often come hand-in-hand. In order to read effectively we often have to jot down the main ideas and key words introduced in the text. We might also note down one or two questions as we go along to assist in the ‘thinking’ part of the process. But, like reading, note taking comes in all shapes and sizes, and different kinds of notes can be useful for different purposes. Moreover, good note taking, like purposeful, activ
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Introduction

This unit is about the very basic study skills of reading and taking notes. You will be asked to think about how you currently read and then be introduced to a some techniques that may help you to alter the way you read according to the material you are studying. In the second section you will be asked to look at some useful techniques for note taking and how you may apply them to the notes you make.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Introducing the soc
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3.1.1 Treatment or management?

In the preceding paragraph you will notice that we talked generally about the treatment of conditions, but referred to ‘managing’ dyslexia. Why did we do this? It relates to the following important general issues:

Is treatment (i.e. intervention) warranted? We mentioned this issue when we were discussing sociocultural or personal distress based definitions of abnormality. Intervention is not always desi
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3.1 Thinking about intervention

So far we have looked at issues relating to how we define ‘abnormal’ behaviour, and how we think about explanations. Now we will consider the more practical issue of how to approach the treatment of such difficulties. As in the previous section, we will discuss behavioural, cognitive and biological perspectives on treatment and consider specific techniques from each perspective that are applicable to the management of dyslexia.


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1.6 Positive indicators for dyslexia

Dyslexia is recognized if the person shows various core behavioural symptoms or other features associated with dyslexia.

As mentioned in the previous section, contemporary approaches also involve identifying positive indicators that signal potential dyslexia by their presence. Dyslexia involves specific weaknesses in areas that relate to written language, but because it is not associated with a g
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4 Contents of the plan

Figure 2
Figure 2

The plan should be a working document that informs a
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Acknowledgements

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Author

Sue Platt has been a school governor for 21 years, at both primary and secondary p
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4.5.2 Don't – compromise academic standards

If you make adjustments in examinations and assessments, you must still be satisfied that a student is being assessed against the same learning objectives as other students.


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4.4.4 Do – provide alternative academic content

There is a difference between supplying deaf students with a simple transcript of an interview, which is a straightforward translation between formats, and providing blind students with an alternative to a visual image. In some cases, a transcript may require an academic decision about whether to transcribe every ‘um’ and ‘er’ or background noise. Decisions about alternative academic content need to be taken by the author of a resource, or someone with the same understanding of the in
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3.13.1 General

OU Knowledge Network, ‘Guidelines for describing visual teaching material’ http://kn.open.ac.uk/ public/ index.cfm?wpid=2709

US National Public Website on Assistive Technology


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3.12 Activity task 6: solutions to challenging activities

Return to your list of the challenging activities, which you updated in ‘Discussing disability’.

Add notes on possible solutions to as many of the challenges as you can.

You might like to share your ideas in the Comments section below and discuss the similarities and differences.


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3.3 Visual impairment

There are approximately two million people in the UK who have a sight problem. The Royal National Institute of the Blind (RNIB) defines someone as having a sight problem if they are unable to recognise someone across the road or they have difficulty reading newsprint even when wearing glasses (RNIB, 2005, ‘About sight loss – changing the way we think about blindness’).

When discussing visually impaired people it is important to distinguish between partially sighted people (also kn
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6 Communicating and OpenLearn

A variety of software tools are available to help you communicate with others to rework content and to enable your learners to work with each other. As well as Compendium, the mind mapping tool described in Activity 3, FlashMeeting enables video-conferencing through a web browser, and the Comments allow asynchronous discussion
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1.3.2 Exploring other activities

After trying Activity 3 you may want to explore some of the other resources given or even develop your own, in which case the Global Dimension section of the ASE site or the New Scientist online may be helpful starting points.

One way of bringing global science into the classroom is by using ‘off-the-shelf’ activities that:

  • exemplify curriculum content – for example, iron was extracted from its ore in a precursor of the blast furn
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1.1 Teaching languages: language awareness

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2 Book reviews

The comments below all relate to the same book, Ruby Holler by Sharon Creech, and have been made by pupils at Churchill Community School, North Somerset – the ‘Churchill Chatterboxes’.

A captivating yet far-fetched book, I feel this would suit most younger readers but older readers would want something more demanding. (Margaret)

I think Ruby Holler is a very moving book, especially when Da
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • engage in debates on different views of creativity and form a view on what creativity means;

  • recognise the ways in which individuals can be creators and generators of new knowledge;

  • explore ways in which ICT creates new opportunities for creative, collaborative activity.


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1 Visions of geography: an introduction

In considering the image which best reflects your ‘vision’ of geography, perhaps it is the volcano, which is a testament to the ‘awe and wonder’ of the natural world? Or is your vision to help young people make sense of the gross inequalities that exist in the world?

Geography teaching is also about providing young people with the skills that help them fit into the demands of an increasingly globalised economy. There is the argument that geography teaching is at its best when it
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