CSSJ: Cohen Conference: Money, Work and Body Parts: Cohen on Coercion
Rescuing Justice and Equality: Celebrating the Career of G.A. Cohen - Conference at the Centre for the Study of Social Justice (CSSJ), Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. Friday 23 and Saturday 24 January 2009 On January 23-24 2009, with the generous support of Philosophy and Public Affairs, the Centre for the Study of Social Justice will be hosting a conference to celebrate the career of G.A. Cohen, who is retiring after 23 years as Chichele Professor of So
Author(s): Cecile Fabre, comments by Hillel Steiner

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CSSJ: Cohen Conference: Justice as Fairness: Luck Egalitarian, not Rawlsian
Rescuing Justice and Equality: Celebrating the Career of G.A. Cohen - Conference at the Centre for the Study of Social Justice (CSSJ), Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. Friday 23 and Saturday 24 January 2009 On January 23-24 2009, with the generous support of Philosophy and Public Affairs, the Centre for the Study of Social Justice will be hosting a conference to celebrate the career of G.A. Cohen, who is retiring after 23 years as Chichele Professor of So
Author(s): Michael Otsuka, comments by Jonathan Wolff

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CSSJ: Cohen Conference: The Ethics of Distribution in a Warming Planet
Rescuing Justice and Equality: Celebrating the Career of G.A. Cohen - Conference at the Centre for the Study of Social Justice (CSSJ), Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. Friday 23 and Saturday 24 January 2009 On January 23-24 2009, with the generous support of Philosophy and Public Affairs, the Centre for the Study of Social Justice will be hosting a conference to celebrate the career of G.A. Cohen, who is retiring after 23 years as Chichele Professor of So
Author(s): John Roemer, comments by Joshua Cohen (read by Stu

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CSSJ: Cohen Conference: Justice, Equality and Incentives
Rescuing Justice and Equality: Celebrating the Career of G.A. Cohen - Conference at the Centre for the Study of Social Justice (CSSJ), Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. Friday 23 and Saturday 24 January 2009 On January 23-24 2009, with the generous support of Philosophy and Public Affairs, the Centre for the Study of Social Justice will be hosting a conference to celebrate the career of G.A. Cohen, who is retiring after 23 years as Chichele Professor of So
Author(s): Seana Shiffrin, comments by Richard Arneson

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CSSJ: Cohen Conference: Constructivism and Publicity
Rescuing Justice and Equality: Celebrating the Career of G.A. Cohen - Conference at the Centre for the Study of Social Justice (CSSJ), Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. Friday 23 and Saturday 24 January 2009 On January 23-24 2009, with the generous support of Philosophy and Public Affairs, the Centre for the Study of Social Justice will be hosting a conference to celebrate the career of G.A. Cohen, who is retiring after 23 years as Chichele Professor of So
Author(s): Andrew Williams, comments by Wayne Sumner

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CSSJ: Cohen Conference: Closing Comments
Rescuing Justice and Equality: Celebrating the Career of G.A. Cohen - Conference at the Centre for the Study of Social Justice (CSSJ), Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. Friday 23 and Saturday 24 January 2009 On January 23-24 2009, with the generous support of Philosophy and Public Affairs, the Centre for the Study of Social Justice will be hosting a conference to celebrate the career of G.A. Cohen, who is retiring after 23 years as Chichele Professor of So
Author(s): G.A. Cohen

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17.418 Field Seminar in International Relations Theory (MIT)
Provides an overview of the field of international relations and introduces two widely used typologies in the field. It then reviews the liberal, neo-liberal, realist, and neo-realist schools; the sociological literature on international relations; the constructivist literature on identity and interest formation in international politics; the mainstream literature on conflict and cooperation; and theoretically informed debates about the post-cold war world and the future of international politic
Author(s): Fravel, M. Taylor, 1971-

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT)
Explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. Goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. Special emphasis on education, health, gender, fertility, adoption of technological innovation, and the markets for land, credit, and labor. From the course home page: Course Description In this course, we will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal
Author(s): Duflo, Esther, 1972-,Banerjee, Abhijit

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

INFO2009 Resource for "Minus Tim"
INFO2009 Resource for "Minus Tim" - Andrew Cook and Michael Harris and Chi Lok Koo and Joshua Thompson and Ravi Undupitiya Keywords:Licensing , Copyright , Accessibility , Open Source , Legislation
Author(s): No creator set

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Lecture 16 - 11/18/2010
Lecture 16
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6 Summary
The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. The unit considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.2 Reactor safety: the Chernobyl incident
The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. The unit considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

4.1 Introduction
The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. The unit considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

3.3 Uranium production and economics
The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. The unit considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

3.1 Introduction
The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. The unit considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

2.5 The growth, decline and future of nuclear power
The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. The unit considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

2.4 Fuel requirements for nuclear reactors
The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. The unit considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

2.3 Nuclear reactors
The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. The unit considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

1 Nuclear energy
The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. The unit considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

2.2 The challenge of methods
In a complex and rapidly changing world, social scientific study examines how we produce things, communicate, govern ourselves, understand our environments, and how to solve the problems we face in the organisation of social relations and processes. This unit provides a basic overview of how social science contains deeply embedded cultural assumptions and outlines the important relationship between philosophical thinking and practical research methods in social sciences.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2