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2.7 Interpreting the classical form
In this unit you will be introduced to a variety of Delacroix’s work and see how his paintings relate to the cultural transition from Enlightenment to Romanticism. You will study Delacroix’s early career, his classical background, the development of Romantic ideas and their incorporation into his work. You will have the opportunity to study some of his most important paintings and compare them to works favouring a Neoclassical approach. You will also be able to see how his themes, subjects
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2.6 An alternative deathbed tradition
In this unit you will be introduced to a variety of Delacroix’s work and see how his paintings relate to the cultural transition from Enlightenment to Romanticism. You will study Delacroix’s early career, his classical background, the development of Romantic ideas and their incorporation into his work. You will have the opportunity to study some of his most important paintings and compare them to works favouring a Neoclassical approach. You will also be able to see how his themes, subjects
Author(s): The Open University

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2.5 Neoclassical – the established style
In this unit you will be introduced to a variety of Delacroix’s work and see how his paintings relate to the cultural transition from Enlightenment to Romanticism. You will study Delacroix’s early career, his classical background, the development of Romantic ideas and their incorporation into his work. You will have the opportunity to study some of his most important paintings and compare them to works favouring a Neoclassical approach. You will also be able to see how his themes, subjects
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Sardanapalus – subject and composition
In this unit you will be introduced to a variety of Delacroix’s work and see how his paintings relate to the cultural transition from Enlightenment to Romanticism. You will study Delacroix’s early career, his classical background, the development of Romantic ideas and their incorporation into his work. You will have the opportunity to study some of his most important paintings and compare them to works favouring a Neoclassical approach. You will also be able to see how his themes, subjects
Author(s): The Open University

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2.1 Inspiration for the Death of Sardanapalus
In this unit you will be introduced to a variety of Delacroix’s work and see how his paintings relate to the cultural transition from Enlightenment to Romanticism. You will study Delacroix’s early career, his classical background, the development of Romantic ideas and their incorporation into his work. You will have the opportunity to study some of his most important paintings and compare them to works favouring a Neoclassical approach. You will also be able to see how his themes, subjects
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 Ideas and influences
In this unit you will be introduced to a variety of Delacroix’s work and see how his paintings relate to the cultural transition from Enlightenment to Romanticism. You will study Delacroix’s early career, his classical background, the development of Romantic ideas and their incorporation into his work. You will have the opportunity to study some of his most important paintings and compare them to works favouring a Neoclassical approach. You will also be able to see how his themes, subjects
Author(s): The Open University

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1.1 Delacroix’s background
In this unit you will be introduced to a variety of Delacroix’s work and see how his paintings relate to the cultural transition from Enlightenment to Romanticism. You will study Delacroix’s early career, his classical background, the development of Romantic ideas and their incorporation into his work. You will have the opportunity to study some of his most important paintings and compare them to works favouring a Neoclassical approach. You will also be able to see how his themes, subjects
Author(s): The Open University

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2.3 Is religion a museum piece?

We have used the video sequence below to highlight the emic/etic problem and we would like you to carry out a short exercise using it to consolidate your understanding of these terms.

The video introduces St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art in Glasgow, which has been described as the first public museum of religion in the world. Do note, however, that the Museum of Religions at the University of Marburg, Germany was founded in 1927 by Rudolf Otto. It contains a considerable number
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1.8 Religion and spirituality

A good example of polysemy can be found in the different ways in which people regard the terms ‘religion’ and ‘spirituality’, and this is the subject of the first exercise below.

Exercise

Give some thoug
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2.1 New perspectives

The purpose of studying religion is to make the strange familiar, and the familiar strange.

Exercise

We would encourage you now t
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1.7 Language

Language is frequently a knotty problem in religion. As religions and religious ideas move from their place of origin to other cultures, either the new recipients have to learn the language of origin (Hebrew, Japanese, Sanskrit) or it has to be translated, in the course of which new interpretations, nuances or simply mistakes creep in. The majority of the new audience are thus at the mercy of the translators and interpreters, being unable to read or understand the original for themselves. Thi
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • have an awareness of key themes and debates in the field of religious studies;

  • have an understanding that religions have different, and sometimes contrasting, ways to present their beliefs and practices, and that the beliefs and practices of one religion are represented differently by others;

  • have an awareness that different media are used to represent and present religions.

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3.4.1 Activity 8
Marketing means different things to different people. How do you decide who to aim a campaign at? If you already have a background in marketing, this unit will improve your understanding of market orientation and (going to market). It also assesses the importance of managing key internal and external relationships.
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2.15 Is M&S market led?
Marketing means different things to different people. How do you decide who to aim a campaign at? If you already have a background in marketing, this unit will improve your understanding of market orientation and (going to market). It also assesses the importance of managing key internal and external relationships.
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2.14 Marks and Spencer: a case study
Marketing means different things to different people. How do you decide who to aim a campaign at? If you already have a background in marketing, this unit will improve your understanding of market orientation and (going to market). It also assesses the importance of managing key internal and external relationships.
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2.13.2 Operational excellence
Marketing means different things to different people. How do you decide who to aim a campaign at? If you already have a background in marketing, this unit will improve your understanding of market orientation and (going to market). It also assesses the importance of managing key internal and external relationships.
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2.13.1 Product leadership
Marketing means different things to different people. How do you decide who to aim a campaign at? If you already have a background in marketing, this unit will improve your understanding of market orientation and (going to market). It also assesses the importance of managing key internal and external relationships.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.13 Dominating the market
Marketing means different things to different people. How do you decide who to aim a campaign at? If you already have a background in marketing, this unit will improve your understanding of market orientation and (going to market). It also assesses the importance of managing key internal and external relationships.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.12 Narrowing the focus
Marketing means different things to different people. How do you decide who to aim a campaign at? If you already have a background in marketing, this unit will improve your understanding of market orientation and (going to market). It also assesses the importance of managing key internal and external relationships.
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2.11 Choosing customers
Marketing means different things to different people. How do you decide who to aim a campaign at? If you already have a background in marketing, this unit will improve your understanding of market orientation and (going to market). It also assesses the importance of managing key internal and external relationships.
Author(s): The Open University

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