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Acknowledgements
This unit is intended to further develop your understanding of Newtonian mechanics in relation to oscillating systems. In addition to a basic grounding in solving systems of differential equations, this unit assumes that you have some understanding of eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Author(s): The Open University

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Modelling with systems of differential equations
This unit is intended to further develop your understanding of Newtonian mechanics in relation to oscillating systems. In addition to a basic grounding in solving systems of differential equations, this unit assumes that you have some understanding of eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Author(s): The Open University

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Systems of differential equations
This unit shows how various situations can be modelled by a system of linear differential equations. The prerequisite requirements to gain full advantage from this unit are a basic understanding of differential equations, a familiarity with the properties of matrices and determinants and some understanding of eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes
This unit shows how various situations can be modelled by a system of linear differential equations. The prerequisite requirements to gain full advantage from this unit are a basic understanding of differential equations, a familiarity with the properties of matrices and determinants and some understanding of eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction
This unit shows how various situations can be modelled by a system of linear differential equations. The prerequisite requirements to gain full advantage from this unit are a basic understanding of differential equations, a familiarity with the properties of matrices and determinants and some understanding of eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Author(s): The Open University

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Acknowledgements
Mentoring, observation and interviews are three important strategies in developing student teachers. This unit, which gives a flavour of the Open University's flexible PGCE course, introduces student–teacher centred strategies both inside and outside of the classroom involving mentors, pupils, tutors and others to develop student teachers' professional skills and understanding.
Author(s): The Open University

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5.3.3 One-to-one tutorial
Mentoring, observation and interviews are three important strategies in developing student teachers. This unit, which gives a flavour of the Open University's flexible PGCE course, introduces student–teacher centred strategies both inside and outside of the classroom involving mentors, pupils, tutors and others to develop student teachers' professional skills and understanding.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.2 Observing teachers and pupils
Mentoring, observation and interviews are three important strategies in developing student teachers. This unit, which gives a flavour of the Open University's flexible PGCE course, introduces student–teacher centred strategies both inside and outside of the classroom involving mentors, pupils, tutors and others to develop student teachers' professional skills and understanding.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.1 Sharing practice
Mentoring, observation and interviews are three important strategies in developing student teachers. This unit, which gives a flavour of the Open University's flexible PGCE course, introduces student–teacher centred strategies both inside and outside of the classroom involving mentors, pupils, tutors and others to develop student teachers' professional skills and understanding.
Author(s): The Open University

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4 Summary

Commentators (e.g. Pijl et al., 1997) have described inclusive education as ‘a global agenda’. The persistence of the forces that marginalise individuals or groups of learners, and also the models that would categorise them in particular ways, makes the struggle for inclusion an ongoing one.

You will see why at the start of this section we felt it important to define what we and others may mean when we use the term ‘inclusion’. This is because understanding what
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2.2 Evaluating discussion (continued)

Activity 4: Evaluating discussions (2)

5 hours 0 minutes

The quality of discussion amongst students can be evaluated by carrying out the following activity.

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Introduction

This unit draws attention to the value of a sociocultural understanding of spoken language in the processes of teaching and learning. It focuses upon how language can be used for persuasion, control and argument, and how dialogue can act as an aid to development. Along with some background reading and activities this unit offers opportunities for the evaluation of some selected classroom talk.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Language and literacy in a
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3.3 Types of quantitative systems model
Maps and plans, architects and engineers, drawings, graphs and tables: all are models we use in everyday life. This unit will introduce you to the modelling process enabling you to recognise that systems models may be used in different ways as part of a process for: improving understanding of a situation; identifying problems or formulating opportunities and supporting decision making.
Author(s): The Open University

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References

Ackoff, R.L. (1974a) ‘The systems revolution’, Long Range Planning, vol. 7, pp.2–5.
Ackoff, R.L. (1974b) Redesigning the Future, New York, Wiley.
Ackoff, R.L. (1981) Creating the Corporate Future, New York, Wiley.
Ackoff, R.L. (1995) ‘Whole-ing the parts and righting the wrongs’, Systems R
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1 What to expect
We all know that the heart is very important but what exactly does the heart do? Why is the blood so important? What functions do the lungs perform? In this unit, we will try to provide at least a basic understanding so we can answer these questions and begin to understand why knowing about the heart is important for all sports people. Before that we will take a look at the human body.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.2 Clips 4 to 5
In this unit, you will be hearing and reading about the issues faced by people living in poverty in Britain in 2000. This is intended to give you an understanding of what poverty is like from the perspective of the people themselves, both in terms of the experience of living on a very low income, and some of the effects this has had on their lives. One of the biggest problems facing people living on a very low income is how to afford adequate heating.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Those needing support
In this unit, you will be hearing and reading about the issues faced by people living in poverty in Britain in 2000. This is intended to give you an understanding of what poverty is like from the perspective of the people themselves, both in terms of the experience of living on a very low income, and some of the effects this has had on their lives. One of the biggest problems facing people living on a very low income is how to afford adequate heating.
Author(s): The Open University

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1 Fuel poverty
In this unit, you will be hearing and reading about the issues faced by people living in poverty in Britain in 2000. This is intended to give you an understanding of what poverty is like from the perspective of the people themselves, both in terms of the experience of living on a very low income, and some of the effects this has had on their lives. One of the biggest problems facing people living on a very low income is how to afford adequate heating.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 Health and the media
This unit considers two ideas: that health is an ever-present factor in our lives, and that health is something difficult to define. But how can we say that health is everywhere if it is so mysterious? How do we recognise health if it so difficult to define? There are no easy answers to these questions! In this unit we explore this paradox, not just because it is a fascinating dilemma but because understanding health in all its multifaceted complexity is a prerequisite to working for health in i
Author(s): The Open University

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Helen Langdon's ‘Caravaggio’
Accounts of Caravaggio's life are filled with suggestions of murder and intrigue. But does knowing more about this dark artist's experiences help us to interpret his art? Or does understanding his motivations cloud their true meaning? This unit explores the biographical monograph, one of the most common forms of art history writing.
Author(s): The Open University

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