Waldseemüller’s Map: World 1507
The 1507 World Map by Martin Waldseemüller is one of the world’s most important maps. For the first time, this map labels America and shows the continent as a separate land mass. It is often referred to as America’s Birth Certificate. Students will investigate this map by looking closely at the details of each section of the map and then draw conclusions on the revelation of this new and unusual world to the people of 1507.
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Access to the Internet
Using the Internet depends, in the first instance, on access to the network. The initial emergence of "the Internet" in the early 1990s, from the increasing connectivity of a series of university and government networks alongside private services like America Online, Prodigy, and CompuServe, occurred almost entirely across slow dial-up modem connections over telephone wires. Sufficient for email, Usenet news groups, transferring relatively small files, and later viewing simple web pages, slow tr
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California Fires MODIS imagery and TOMS Aerosols from October 2003
This animation sequences through the MODIS imagery of the devastating Californian fires from October 23, 2003 through October 29, 2003. Then the animation resets to October 23, 2003 and zooms out to see the TOMS aerosol sequence. It clearly shows that the California fires had an impact on air quality as far east as Maine.
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Calculus II, Fall 2007
This course is the continuation of MATH 1210. Topics covered includes arc length, area of a surface of revolution, moments and centers of mass, integration techniques, sequences and series, parametrization of curves and polar coordinates, vectors in 3-space, quadric surfaces and cylindrical and spherical coordinates.
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Kinetic Energy
Most students will have an intuitive sense that kinetic energy depends on how fast something is moving (speed) and how massive it is (mass). (We use speed instead of velocity, because energy is a scalar, and independent of direction.) They know that it hurts more in dodge ball when the ball is thrown with more speed than when it is thrown with less speed. They also know that is hurts more to drop a bowling ball on their foot than it does to drop a tennis ball. Exactly how mass, speed and kinetic
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Listening, writing, vocabulary, grammar: Hello, ich heisse Jürgen Schnellinger
At the end of this lesson you can write a short note (an email) in which you introduce yourself. You especially practice your vocabulary relating to your home and profession. You practice the use of personal pronouns.
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"We Did Not Have Enough Money": George Miller's Testimony about the 1919 Steel Strike
In the dramatic 1919 steel strike, 350,000 workers walked off their jobs and crippled the industry. The U.S. Senate Committee on Education and Labor set out to investigate the strike while it was still in progress. In his testimony before the committee, Clairton worker George Miller called the 1919 strike a quest for "a standard American living"--a phrase that was particularly meaningful to the Serbian-born Miller.
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"The Men Seem To Be Pretty Well Satisfied": John Anderson on the 1919 Steel Strike
In the dramatic 1919 steel strike, 350,000 workers walked off their jobs and crippled the industry. The U.S. Senate Committee on Education and Labor set out to investigate the strike while it was still in progress. In his testimony before the committee, John Anderson, a helper in the open-hearth furnace at the Homestead steelworks in Pennsylvania, maintains that the steelworkers were satisfied with conditions. Although born in Scotland, Anderson identified himself as an"American" in distinction
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"Please, Let Me Put Him in a Macaroni Box" The Spanish Influenza of 1918 in Philadelphia
In 1918 and 1919 the Spanish influenza killed more humans than any other disease in a similar period in the history of the world. In the United States a quarter of the population (25 million people or more) contracted the flu; 550,000 died. In the early 1980s, when historian Charles Hardy did interviews for the Philadelphia radio program "The Influenza Pandemic of 1918," he was struck by the painful memories as many older Philadelphians recalled the inability of the city to care for the dead and
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"I Glanced Up--The Statue of Liberty!": Emma Goldman Describes Her Deportation in the Era of the Red
After World War I, a "red scare" gripped the United States. One reflection of this climate of hysteria was in the "Palmer raids" on radicals. Striking without warning and without warrants, Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer's men smashed union offices and the headquarters of Communist and Socialist organizations. They concentrated whenever possible on aliens rather than citizens, because aliens had fewer rights. In December 1919, in their most famous act, Palmer's agents seized 249 resident ali
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"He'll Come Home in a Box": The Spanish Influenza of 1918 Comes to Montana
In 1918 and 1919, the Spanish influenza killed 550,000 people in the United States and 20 to 40 million worldwide. In a 1982 interview with Laurie Mercier, Loretta Jarussi of Bearcreek, Montana, described how people would pass through that tiny town seemingly healthy, only to be reported dead two days later. Her father went undiagnosed for many weeks and had plans to go to a nearby hot springs to rest. She believed that her father's death was averted only because the son of the local doctor was
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"Get the Rope!" Anti-German Violence in World War I-era Wisconsin
In the early 20th century, German Americans were the nation's largest immigrant group. Although they were regarded as a model of successful assimilation, they faced vicious--and sometimes violent--attacks on their loyalty when the United States went to war against Germany in 1917. The most notorious incident was the lynching of German-born Robert Prager in Colinsville, Illinois, in April 1918. Other incidents stopped just short of murder. In a statement made on October 22, 1918, John Deml, a far
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Yellowstone Fires
This Starting Point Teaching Collection page describes the Yellowstone Fires module created for NASA's Classroom of the Future. Emphasizing an integrated approach to environmental earth science through problem-based learning, the module asks students to assume the role of environmental biologist, and help several government agencies resolve the debate surrounding "let it burn" policies in national parks. The government agencies would like to know whether or not to allow naturally occurring fires
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Transnational Pollution: Why Are You Dumping on Me?
This lesson familiarizes students with the different types of transnational pollution, and gives them an opportunity to role-play in a hypothetical case of transnational pollution involving the Danube River. The major goal of this activity is to show students that an incident in one nation may well have serious environmental consequences for other nations. Additionally, it will give students an opportunity to role-play complex roles that are meaningful and consequential to global concerns. The l
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Femme a la Cafetiere, La
Acclaimed theater director brings movement to Cezanne's painting, reproduced in the studio for the camera. [Suzushi Hanayagi,] a dancer from the Kabuki theater, performs the role of the woman, whose slight, almost imperceptible, facial and body movements -- together with mysteriously animated objects and strange apparitions -- bring the painting alive. A spoon stirs a cup of coffee without the benefit of human assistance. An off-camera figure manipulates objects. The woman eats green candies. A
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Sabda
"Sabda" is a eulogy to the North Indian poet Kabir and other Indian mystics. The title refers to 'the word,' the original sound of existence. Excerpts from poems are interwoven with a continuous flow of images and sounds of daily life situations in India. The Indian landscape is revealed through pictures of workers harvesting wheat, a full moon visible between two trees, and wildlife in their natural habitats. Scenes showing street life and details of temples and spiritual icons depict elements
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Virtual Maths - Basic Structures, shear force point of load
Interactive simulation demonstrating shear force at point of load
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Teach what you love
Stephen Mullaney works as a half-time ESL resource teacher/half-time second grade language arts teacher at Club Boulevard Elementary in Durham. This article focuses on his advice for teachers working with ESL students.
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What Is the Function of Photosynthesis?
Photosynthesis is the function by which plant chlorophyll absorbs radiation from the sun, carbon dioxide and water, in order to create a reaction that produces sugar and oxygen. (01:54)
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