2.4 Thermal and electrical conductance

Thermal conductance, Gt, is analogous to electrical conductance, Ge. The longer a conductor is and the smaller its cross section, the lower its conductance will be.

Thermal conductance is given by:

and electrical conductance by:
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University

Cost Effective Alemite Grease Pumps

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde

Author(s): DeclanMoore

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Internet Scout Project
"...bioterrorism thrives on public fear." Dr. Ralph R. Frerichs of the UCLA School of Public Health maintains this Web site to educate students, the public, and health professionals about the public health impact of bioterrorism. The site offers links to recent articles about the public health threat of biological weapons and information about various diseases associated with possible biological weapons, including anthrax, smallpox, botulism and others. Unless you are a UCLA student, most viewer
Author(s): Frerichs, Ralph R.

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Bi 20, Sn 80 (wt%)
Low concentration of bismuth - there are two components - higher bismuth (light coloured because bismuth has a larger atomic mass than tin) and low bismuth (grey).
Author(s): Matt Charles, Department of Materials Science and

License information
Related content

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Bi 10, Sn 90 (wt%)
Low concentration of bismuth - there are two components - higher bismuth (light coloured because bismuth has a larger atomic mass than tin) and low bismuth (grey).
Author(s): Matt Charles, Department of Materials Science and

License information
Related content

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

2-D SS Heat Conduction - Computational Approach II from the course Heat Transfer
This course covers transport processes of mass, momentum, and energy from a macroscopic view with emphasis both on understanding why matter behaves as it does and on developing practical problem solving skills. The course is divided into four parts: introduction, conduction, convection, and radiation.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

2-D SS Heat Conduction - Computational Approach I from the course Heat Transfer
This course covers transport processes of mass, momentum, and energy from a macroscopic view with emphasis both on understanding why matter behaves as it does and on developing practical problem solving skills. The course is divided into four parts: introduction, conduction, convection, and radiation.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

1-D Steady State Heat Conduction II from the course Heat Transfer
This course covers transport processes of mass, momentum, and energy from a macroscopic view with emphasis both on understanding why matter behaves as it does and on developing practical problem solving skills. The course is divided into four parts: introduction, conduction, convection, and radiation.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

1-D Steady State Heat Conduction I from the course Heat Transfer
This course covers transport processes of mass, momentum, and energy from a macroscopic view with emphasis both on understanding why matter behaves as it does and on developing practical problem solving skills. The course is divided into four parts: introduction, conduction, convection, and radiation.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Column Chromatography Experiment
This site describes a simple separation of a binary mixture using liquid chromatography followed by purity analysis by melting point, and may be appropriate for an introduction to chromatography in an organic chemistry laboratory.
Author(s): Wellesley

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Space Jell-O
This hands-on OLogy experiment uses Jell-O, fruit, nuts, and candy to demonstrate how space bends around anything that has mass. The activity begins with kid-friendly introductions to the concept of mass and Einstein's theory of bending space. The illustrated, step-by-step directions include notes about how the fruit, nuts, and candy represent stars, planets, and other objects in space. At the end, kids are encouraged to celebrate their newfound knowledge by digging into their edible space.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Rocking the Boat
The concepts of stability and equilibrium are introduced while students learn how these ideas are related to the concept of center of mass. They gain further understanding when they see, first-hand, how equilibrium is closely related to an object's center of mass. In an associated literacy activity, students learn about motion capture technology, the importance of center of gravity in animation and how use the concept of center of gravity in writing an action scene.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

The Big Mo
Momentum is not only a physical principle; it is a psychological phenomenon. Students learn how the "Big Mo" of the bandwagon effect contributes to the development of fads and manias, and how modern technology and mass media accelerate and intensify the effect. Students develop media literacy and critical thinking skills to analyze trends and determine the extent to which their decisions may be influenced by those who manipulate a few opinion leaders. Note: The literacy activities for the Mechan
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Chronos: a network for Earth system history
CHRONOS (Greek: time) aims to create a dynamic, interactive and time-calibrated framework for Earth history. CHRONOS's main objective is to develop a network of databases and visualization and analytical methodologies that broadly deal with chronostratigraphy - that is, with developing a better tool (the time scale) for understanding fundamental Earth processes through time. The CHRONOS platform will provide a new investigative environment for interdisciplinary Earth history research that includ
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Computer enhanced education in undergraduate dietetics programs
Since computer technology was reported as underutilized on a previoussurvey, the objective of this study was to strengthen the role of technology forundergraduate programs in food and nutrition. The purpose was to determinewhether attendance at a workshop on computer applications would increase thevariety and frequency of use of computer applications and educational materials inundergraduate nutrition programs and would stimulate the development of computerenhanced education materials. A 89-item
Author(s): Williams, Jennifer M.

License information
Related content

Rights not set

4
Popular Front;Fascism;Reprint of an advertisement for gas masks in children's sizes; announcement of a mass meeting to promote democracy and peace.
Author(s): People's Congress for Democracy and Peace

License information
Related content

http://www.library.pitt.edu/libraries/archives/policies/guidelines.html

3
Popular Front;Fascism;Reprint of an advertisement for gas masks in children's sizes; announcement of a mass meeting to promote democracy and peace.
Author(s): People's Congress for Democracy and Peace

License information
Related content

http://www.library.pitt.edu/libraries/archives/policies/guidelines.html

The Mole
You probably remember the mole from high school chemistry, but do you remember why it is useful to chemists? The goal of the following video is to give the "big picture" of the mole and its applications; information on how to use the mole in calculations can be found in another tutorial. Throughout this course, we will use the term "molecular weight" to refer to the mass of a mole of a substance (for instance, the molecular weight of oxygen (O2) is 32 g/mol). Recent textbooks refer to this as "m
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Calculate the Top Quark Mass
Students use conservation of momentum to calculate the mass of the top quark. This activity examines the fingerprint of a top/antitop production that took place in the D-Zero Detector at Fermilab on July 9, 1995. This activity will build on student understanding of vector addition and depends upon only a small amount of particle physics explanation.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Applying Ohm's Law to Semiconductors
This project allows students to apply concepts of momentum conservation and energy conservation from classical physics. However, here they are not enough: they must be combined with modern physics, using concepts from relativity and particle physics as well as modern units that put energy, mass, and momentum in terms of MeV and GeV. Most important, students will learn about both fundamental and cutting-edge physics by actually doing what physicists do.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content