Why do we do proofs?
The aim of this session is to motivate students to understand why we might want to do proofs, why proofs are important, and how they can help us. In particular, the student will learn the following: proofs can help you to really see WHY a result is true; problems that are easy to state can be hard to solve (Fermat's Last Theorem); sometimes statements which appear to be intuitively obvious may turn out to be false (the Hospitals paradox); the answer to a question will often depend crucially on t
Author(s): Feinstein Joel F. Dr.

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The Language of Mathematics (28): Proofs Involving a Line, Part 2
Clear, straightforward instruction involving how to solve proofs. Instructor uses a small chalkboard for demonstration.
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Logic & Proofs
This is an introductory course designed for students from a broad range of disciplines, from mathematics and computer science to drama and creative writing. The highly interactive presentation makes it possible for any student to master the material. Concise multimedia lectures introduce each chapter; they discuss, in detail, the central notions and techniques presented in the text, but also articulate and motivate the learning objectives for each chapter. Topics Covered: The notions of statem
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How and why we do mathematical proofs
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009/10 The aim of this short unit is to motivate students to understand why we might want to do proofs (why proofs are important and how they can help us) and to help students with some of the relatively routine aspects of doing proofs. In particular, the student will learn the following: * proofs can help you to really see why a result is true; * problems that are easy to state
Author(s): Feinstein Joel F. Dr

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Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by

4 Proofs in group theory
We all encounter symmetry in our everyday lives, in both natural and man-made structures. The mathematical concepts surrounding symmetry can be a bit more difficult to grasp. This unit explains such concepts as direct and indirect symmetries, Cayley tables and groups through exercises, audio and video.
Author(s): The Open University

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Why do we do proofs?
The aim of this session is to motivate students to understand why we might want to do proofs, why proofs are important, and how they can help us. In particular, the student will learn the following: proofs can help you to really see WHY a result is true; problems that are easy to state can be hard to solve (Fermat's Last Theorem); sometimes statements which appear to be intuitively obvious may turn out to be false (the Hospitals paradox); the answer to a question will often depend crucially on t
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Why do we do proofs?
The aim of this session is to motivate students to understand why we might want to do proofs, why proofs are important, and how they can help us. In particular, the student will learn the following: proofs can help you to really see WHY a result is true; problems that are easy to state can be hard to solve (Fermat's Last Theorem); sometimes statements which appear to be intuitively obvious may turn out to be false (the Hospitals paradox); the answer to a question will often depend crucially on t
Author(s): No creator set

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How and why we do mathematical proofs
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009/10 The aim of this short unit is to motivate students to understand why we might want to do proofs (why proofs are important and how they can help us) and to help students with some of the relatively routine aspects of doing proofs. In particular, the student will learn the following: * proofs can help you to really see why a result is true; * problems that are easy to state can be
Author(s): No creator set

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Why do we do proofs?
The aim of this session is to motivate students to understand why we might want to do proofs, why proofs are important, and how they can help us. In particular, the student will learn the following: proofs can help you to really see WHY a result is true; problems that are easy to state can be hard to solve (Fermat's Last Theorem); sometimes statements which appear to be intuitively obvious may turn out to be false (the Hospitals paradox); the answer to a question will often depend crucially on t
Author(s): Feinstein Joel F. Dr.

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

How and why we do mathematical proofs
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009/10 The aim of this short unit is to motivate students to understand why we might want to do proofs (why proofs are important and how they can help us) and to help students with some of the relatively routine aspects of doing proofs. In particular, the student will learn the following: * proofs can help you to really see why a result is true; * problems that are easy to state can be
Author(s): Feinstein Joel F. Dr

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

The Language of Mathematics (26): Introduction to Proofs
Using a chalkboard, the instructor offers an introduction to proofs.
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The Language of Mathematics (27): Proofs Involving a Line
Clear, straightforward instruction involving how to solve proofs. Instructor uses a small chalkboard for demonstration.
Author(s): No creator set

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The Language of Mathematics (29): Proofs Involving a Line, Part 3
Clear, straightforward instruction involving how to solve proofs. Instructor uses a small chalkboard for demonstration.
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The Language of Mathematics (30): Proofs Involving Triangles
In this video, the instructor provides clear, straightforward instruction involving how to solve proofs that involve triangles. Instructor uses a small chalkboard for demonstration.
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How to Solve Geometry Proofs
Excellent video from Jimmy Chang, who has a master's degree in math and has been a math teacher at St. Pete College for more than eight years.  Mr. Chang explains what geometry proofs are and their importance.
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Cabri as a shared workspace within the proving process.
This paper will discuss some findings from a study investigating the development of the proving process in a dynamic geometry environment. Through a detailed analysis of students' processes when working with open geometry problems involving conjecturing and proving in Cabri, an analytical and explanatory framework has been developed. This paper examines in particular the interactions between the students in the proving process. The analysis shows that Cabri works as a shared workspace, i.e. as a
Author(s): Olivero Federica

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Networked Identities: Understanding Different Types of Social Organisation and Movements Between Str
In this article we take up a critique of the concept of Communities of Practice voiced by several authors, who suggest that network may provide a better metaphor to understand social forms of organisation and learning. This critique we situate within a broader theoretical movement in socio-cultural learning theories. From this we identify some theoretical and analytical challenges to the network metaphor, which we explore and elaborate through an analysis of a Danish social networking site.
Author(s): Ryberg Thomas,Larsen Malene Charlotte

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The Euro Debt Crisis and Economic Theory

Throughout the last year, European debt problems have been cited as a threat to both the euro and to the American economy, among other entities. While many correct assertions have been made concerning the potential impact of a European debt implosion, there have also been many ill-conceived ones. It is often faulty economic theory that leads to faulty conclusions. This article revisits econo
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Stop 11: Michael Zagaris - Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, and Jeff Beck
WHO SHOT ROCK & ROLL: A Photographic History, 1955 to the Present February 25, 2011 - May 22, 2011 Who Shot Rock & Roll is the first major exhibition on rock and roll to put photographers in the...

www.columbiamuseum.org questions: pnugent@columbiamuseum.org

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Rebels turn tour guides in Gaddafi home
Rebel fighters show off what they say is a beachside compound belonging to Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. Deborah Lutterbeck reports.
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