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Dépôt de couches minces par thermo-évaporation

Présentation des couches minces et de ses utilisations. Réalisation pratique de l'évaporation par effet Joule sous vide.

Vidéo issue du projet VideoManip dont l'objectif est la réalisation de courtes séquences filmées, montrant des expériences réelles, qui seraient à la fois trop complexes pour être montées et montrées en amphi, et pas assez riches d'enseignement pour justifier un TP de plusieurs heures. Les sciences de l'ingénieur consistent à utiliser un phénomèn
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5.5 How society constructs scientific thinking

To understand science, it is important that we appreciate the contexts in which discoveries are made or suppressed. We can see from the account on the previous page that human understanding of the universe has changed significantly over time. The social and political climate in which scientists work has always had a profound influence on what can and cannot be said, done, published or even postulated as worthy of further investigation. (You could undertake a similar study of the debates on hu
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5.3 Objectivity and subjectivity, induction and deduction

The purposes of scientific enquiry are to describe, explain, predict and control (Reaves, 1992). Through scientific training, natural curiosity is developed into objective, empirical (experience-based) study involving observations and controlled experiments which constitute the methods of scientific enquiry that lead to scientific knowledge.

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1.1 An overview of the unit

The relationship between observation of children and educational theory is central to the teaching of this unit: the theory should help you make sense of what you observe, while your observations should help you make sense of the theory. This perspective is reflected in the activities you will find in the blocks of study material. We recommend that you keep a notebook as you work through the unit. You can use this both for the activities that you do at home and for those that involve observat
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Introduction

The unit focuses on the knowledge, learning and thinking of children aged between 3 and 8 years old. It has been written for an audience of practitioners working in the full range of early years care and education settings: you may be a teaching assistant in an early years class, a nursery nurse, a playgroup worker or leader, or a childminder; you may work voluntarily in an early years setting. But whatever the context in which you are working, we expect you to be working there regularly, for
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit.

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EVOCAM procedure captured by video conferencing
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Introduction

In this unit you will be building on your previous study and experience of ‘working with others’. Using the notion of ‘teamwork’, you will be asked to think specifically about the values and beliefs underpinning the following three aspects of practice:

  • developing working relationships with other professionals;

  • sharing information and skills with other professionals;

  • working in cooperation with other profe
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.

Every effort has bee
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5.1 Children's rights

Initial information about the Palmer family

The story of the Palmer family is presented in the audio below, and it provides material about working with families. The case study is a dramatic presentation of a reconstituted family consisting of three generations living in the same household. During th
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4.5 Vulnerability and rights

One of the assumptions that is made in order to justify social workers making such life-changing judgements is that some people are vulnerable and therefore need decisions made on their behalf. This assumption is not held by everyone and is often challenged by groups and individuals representing service users and by service users themselves.

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3.10 References for Extract 2

Bean, P. and Melville, J. (1989) Lost Children of the Empire, London, Unwin Hyman.

Erikson, E. H. (1950) Childhood and Society, New York, Norton Books.

Goffman, E. (1963) Stigma, Harmondsworth, Penguin.

Goffman, E. (1968) Asylums, Harmondsworth, Pelican.

Hall, S. (1990) ‘Cultural identity and diaspora’ in Rutherford, J. (ed.) Identity, Community, Culture and Difference, Lawrence and Wishart, pp. 222–237.

Humphries, S.
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3.9 Conclusion

This extract has covered a wide range of issues designed to make you reflect on your own life experiences and on the experiences and perceptions of service users and practitioners. Social work is about working with people, as service users and as colleagues, and you are also one of the people in this process. I hope that working through the module and listening to the audio clips have prompted you to reflect on your practice.

You will find that many of the themes and issues you have exp
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3.4 Case study 2

A widely used approach in child care was the ‘curative’ policy (Midwinter, 1994). This sought to treat those children and adults deemed deficient in some way in locations specially set up for the purpose. These institutions were often forbidding places, offering a harsh ‘cure’ to those unfortunate enough to be admitted to them. This was the fate of many disabled children in the course of the 20th century. Of particular relevance is Out of Sight: The Experience of Disabili
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Introduction

From an early age, play is important to a child's development and learning. It isn't just physical. It can involve cognitive, imaginative, creative, emotional and social aspects. It is the main way most children express their impulse to explore, experiment and understand. Children of all ages play.

(Dobson, 2004, p.8)

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Devel
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions). This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources:

Illustrations

Pages 101 and 1
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References

Allan, J. (1999) Actively Seeking Inclusion: pupils with special needs in mainstream schools, London, Falmer Press.
Alston, J. (1995) Assessing and Promoting Writing Skills, Stafford, NASEN Enterprises Ltd.
Benjamin, S., Nind, M., Hall, K., Collins, J. and Sheehy, K. (2002) ‘Moments of inclusion and exclusion: pupils negotiating classroom contexts’, pa
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5.1 Introduction
The most ‘important and greatest puzzle’ we face as humans is ourselves (Boring, 1950, p. 56). Humans are a puzzle – one that is complex, subtle and multi-layered, and it gets even more complicated as we evolve over time and change in different contexts. When answering the question ‘What makes us who we are?’, psychologists put forward a range of explanations about why people feel, think and behave the way they do. Just when psychologists seem to understand one bit of ‘who we are’
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1.3.1 The importance of friendship

When children are asked about the things that are important in their experience of education one factor appears to be important above all others – friendship.

In a study of 2,527 children in 500 primary and secondary schools in one local education authority (LEA) in the north-west of England 62.8 per cent stated that happiness at school was the result of friendships (Whittaker, Kenworthy and Crabtree, 1998). This included best friends and also friendly teachers and other friendly pupi
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1.2.1 Children's perceptions of play and learning

An innovative study looked at why children thought they came to their particular schools and centres. Researchers collected the things that children said and analysed the ways in which they said them. The intention behind this was to inform the development of the services the children and their families received (Farrell, Taylor, Tennent and Gahan, 2002). By taking this approach, the children became active and important participants in the work. Building the children's views into the developm
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