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3.2 Adviser time

The governing body is allowed up to eight hours of external adviser time. These are split roughly:

  • three hours for preparation before the meeting;

  • one hour for writing/checking the review statement;

  • four hours in school.

The time allows for both the headteacher and the appointed governors to meet the adviser separately to discuss issues and, in the case of the governors, to seek advice. To do this, th
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will:

  • be able to state your own motivation for producing self-study Open Educational Resources (OERs);

  • have investigated and analysed some of the research into online learning;

  • have evaluated some examples of educational resources for active open learning;

  • be able to plan a structured learning experience using a range of resources;

  • be able to construct an OpenLearn-style unit by remixing res
    Author(s): The Open University

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Acknowledgements

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Author details

Sue Platt has been a school governor for 21 years, at both primary and sec
Author(s): The Open University

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4 Evaluating success

Understanding the reasons for a school's success may require special expertise, but the fact of that success should be clear…..

Martin & Holt, 2002.

Take another look at the cycle for improvement (below).


Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

Museums give children experiences above and beyond the everyday – experiences that enrich and build upon classroom teaching and learning. Taking pupils to a museum, or bringing museum artefacts into school, instantly changes the dynamics of the usual learning environment. It gives you as a teacher the opportunity to start afresh with each child, to reach and engage with pupils in new and different ways. This unit explores practical ways in which you can make the most of the UK's extraordina
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will:

  • have developed a systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of issues in inclusive education;

  • be able to reflect critically upon and analyse your own perspective, and that of others, regarding inclusion;

  • be able to analyse and develop successful inclusive learning practices;

  • be able to identify conceptual frameworks appropriate for investigating inclusion issues, examining the inc
    Author(s): The Open University

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Acknowledgements

The following extracts are from the Study Guide which forms part of an Open University, UK, MA in Education course E841 Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Worldwide and part of LING 936, 937, 938, units of programs in Applied Linguistics of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

These materials were produced and developed jointly by The Open University and Macquarie University. First published 2000, Reprinted 2001.

Copyright © The Open University and Macquarie
Author(s): The Open University

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4.4 Summary

In this section, you have had the opportunity to work on some mathematical activities yourself. This should have enabled you to:

  • reflect on how you approach mathematics and what helps you to work on a piece of mathematics;

  • remind yourself of those pieces of mathematics that you can work at successfully;

  • identify aspects of mathematics that you can strengthen as you work through the later blocks of this unit;


  • Author(s): The Open University

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2.5 Communicating with language

It has been suggested that our ‘linguistic competence’ (Chomsky, 1965) consists simply of the ability to construct ‘well-formed sentences’. The sociolinguist Del Hymes (1979) considered this notion to be far too narrow, and proposed the term ‘communicative competence’ to account for speakers’ ability to use language appropriately. Communicative competence lets us know when to speak and when not to speak, how to take turns in conversations and how to start and end them, and how t
Author(s): The Open University

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5.2 Technologies of help?

Click view document to read: Technology, Selfhood and Physical Disabilty

View document66.4KB PD
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3.1 ‘Race’, ethnicity and communication

As noted in the Introduction, much of the debate about difference and diversity in health and social care has focused on issues of ‘race’ and ethnicity. It is perhaps the area that first comes to mind when there is discussion about issues of communication and difference in care services, but it is also an area where the arguments are most complex and contentious.

As you saw in Section 1, ‘racial’ or ethnic diversity has often been constructed as a ‘problem’ for health and so
Author(s): The Open University

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2.9 Experiencing prejudice and discrimination

Activity 4

0 hours 20 minutes

2.8 ‘Difference’, power and discrimination

These first few sections have emphasised the point that differences are always produced in a social context, and that a key part of that context is power relationships. As pointed out earlier, a key element of Foucault’s social constructionist approach is that the way in which people are categorised in society (for example, by gender, ethnicity or age) involves an exercise of power that reflects the ideas and interests of dominant groups. One of the key arguments against essentialist views
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2.7.5 Identities are negotiated

In constructing their identities, people can only draw on terms that are available in society at that time, which have meanings and associations attached. However, people may attribute different meanings and importance to those labels. This means people always negotiate their identities, in the context of the different meanings attached to them.

Taking this view of identity, as a social process that people engage in, rather than as a fixed essence inside them, is not to deny that partic
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2.4.3 abelling

The term ‘informal carer’ is a label. It was coined to describe people who take on unpaid responsibility for the welfare of another person. It is a term which has meaning only when the public world of care provision comes into contact with the private world of the family where caring is a day-to-day, unremarked-upon activity, like reminding a young child to clean her teeth. Labelling yourself as an informal carer requires a major shift in the way you see yourself, a shift neither Arthur n
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2 Background to the Annual Report of the Chinese Welfare Association (1998)

The first Chinese families arrived in Northern Ireland in the early 1960s. Since then the Chinese population has continued to grow in number and economic strength to become the largest minority ethnic group. There are approximately 8,000 people and over 500 Chinese businesses across Northern Ireland. Most of these businesses are family-run restaurants and takeaways. Working in the catering industry involves long, unsociable working hours and few opportunities for integration into the wider co
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1 The Chinese Welfare Association's Carer Support Project, Belfast

This audio unit features a project that was set up in Northern Ireland specifically to support Chinese carers. It is one of several projects being run by the Chinese Welfare Association in Belfast at that time.

The Chinese Welfare Association

The Chinese Welfare Association is a voluntary orga
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4.3 Children and the armed forces

The dual role of children as both perpetrators and victims of violence becomes very clear when looking at child soldiers. Despite international treaties, thousands of children worldwide fight in armies and paramilitary forces. Article 38 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) states that no child under the age of fifteen should fight; supplementary international treaties, such as the 1999 Maputo Declaration on Child Soldiers and the 2000 Optional Protocol to the U
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Therapy Dogs Visit Georgia Tech Library
Java, a labradoodle, Bogee, a standard poodle, and Brutus, a mastiff helped relieve a little stress by visiting Georgia Tech students during dead week at Price Gilbert Memorial Library. Lots of "awws" and cuddles. Learn more about all Georgia Tech's library and all they offer at http://www.library.gatech.edu/
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Egypt's political crisis


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