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Daniela Quaglia

Anne Mclaren Fellow, Faculty of Science

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Biography

Dr. Quaglia holds a BsC Hons in Chemistry from University of Florence (Italy) and a MSc in Chemistry of Biological Molecules from University of Firenze (Italy) in collaboration with University College Dublin (Ireland). In 2013 she completed her PhD in Chemical Biology with a focus on Biocatalysis working in the group Prof. Francesca Paradisi in University College Dublin. Her thesis was focused on the study, immobilization and engineering of the enzyme Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase). She then worked both in Industry (Synthace, London, UK) and Academia. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the group of Prof. Nicholas Turner (University of Manchester, UK), and then in the group of Prof. Joelle Pelletier (Université de Montréal, QC, Canada), where her work focused on the use and engineering of the enzymes CAR and Cal-A for biocatalysis, and on the application of automation to biological experiments. Daniela is also known as a science communicator in the Synthetic Biology community, she speaks for languages, and she holds a Master in Business Administration (MBA) from Concordia University (QC, Canada).

Research Summary

I have spent the past eight years of my career in the fields of biocatalysis and synthetic biology, working both in industry and academia. My work has focused on engineering various enzymes… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

I have spent the past eight years of my career in the fields of biocatalysis and synthetic biology, working both in industry and academia. My work has focused on engineering various enzymes (carboxylic acid reductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, ene-reductases and lipases) to be used as biocatalysts in the pharmaceutical, flavors, fragrances and food industries. The methodologies I have used and helped to develop, range from the creation of smart libraries of mutants to the development of high-throughput screenings to select for the improved mutants. My projects have always been co-funded by industry (GSK and DSM), a testimony to their applied interest. Having worked in the first start-up company in the UK dedicated to synthetic biology (Synthace) has helped me to better understand the challenges we still need to overcome to transform biology into the engineering discipline of the future - in particular, issues of data reproducibility and big data management.

Current projects include the engineering of Cal-A and CAR for the green production of octanal, and the engineering of enzymes for plastic degradation.

School of Chemistry

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