School of Politics and International Relations
 

Image of James Cockayne

James Cockayne

Professor of Global Politics and Anti-Slavery, Faculty of Social Sciences

Contact

Biography

James Cockayne is Professor of Global Politics and Anti-Slavery, a part-time, remote role working closely with the Rights Lab. He is a member of the World Economic Forum Global Futures Council for Equity and Social Justice, and a fellow of the International Institute for Strategic Studies and the Geneva Centre for Strategic Policy.

Cockayne joined Nottingham in 2020, after serving as the Director of the Centre for Policy Research at United Nations University, in New York, where he led work on modern slavery, development policy, cyber-governance, drug policy and migration. In his time at the United Nations, Cockayne worked with the Prime Minister of Liechtenstein, the Foreign Ministers of Australia and the Netherlands and Nobel laureate Muhamad Yunus, founding Finance Against Slavery and Trafficking (www.fastinitiative.org).

He was previously Co-Director of the Centre for Global Counterterrorism Cooperation, directing work on the UN and Africa; Senior Fellow at the International Peace Institute; and Principal Legal Officer in the Transnational Crime Unit of the Australian Attorney-General's Department. He received his Ph.D. in War Studies from King's College London in 2015, and LL.M. from NYU School of Law in 2005.

He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Journal of Modern Slavery, and was a member of the Editorial Committee for the Journal of International Criminal Justice from 2005 to 2017 (Chair 2007-2008).

Research Summary

James' research straddles international relations, international law and political economy - and is strongly informed by his practical experience in government, international organizations and… read more

Selected Publications

  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2020. Working with the Financial Sector to Correct the Market Failure of Modern Slavery Journal of Business and Human Rights. (In Press.)
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2019. Unlocking Potential: A Blueprint for Mobilizing Finance Against Slavery and Trafficking United Nations University. (9789280865080)
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2018. Fairly Clear Risks: Protecting UN sanctions' legitimacy and effectiveness through fair and clear procedures United Nations University. (9789280890631)
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2017. Can organised crime shape post-war transitions? Evidence from Sicily Third World Thematics. 9-27

Current Research

James' research straddles international relations, international law and political economy - and is strongly informed by his practical experience in government, international organizations and working with global business. His current research focuses on purpose in international regimes, through the lens of global responses to modern slavery. He leads projects focused on: -- government responses to Xinjiang forced labour (www.xinjiangsanctions.info); -- modern slavery risks in the solar industry (under the British Academy's Just Transitions within Sectors Locally and Globally); and -- developing a new forced labour risk estimation tool for institutional investors.

He is currently developing new research on the treatment of modern slavery in trade and investment agreements.

  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2020. Challenges in United Nations counterterrorism coordination. In: BEN SAUL, ed., Research Handbook on International Law and Terrorism 2nd ed.. Edward Elgar.
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2020. Working with the Financial Sector to Correct the Market Failure of Modern Slavery Journal of Business and Human Rights. (In Press.)
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2019. Unlocking Potential: A Blueprint for Mobilizing Finance Against Slavery and Trafficking United Nations University. (9789280865080)
  • KELLY A. GLEASON and JAMES COCKAYNE, 2018. Official Development Assistance and SDG Target 8.7: Measuring Aid to Address Forced Labour, Modern Slavery, Human Trafficking and Child Labour United Nations University. (9789280865)
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2018. Fairly Clear Risks: Protecting UN sanctions' legitimacy and effectiveness through fair and clear procedures United Nations University. (9789280890631)
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2017. Can organised crime shape post-war transitions? Evidence from Sicily Third World Thematics. 9-27
  • CHRISTIAN WENAWESER and JAMES COCKAYNE, 2017. Justice for Syria?: The International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism and the Emergence of the UN General Assembly in the Realm of International Criminal Justice Journal of International Criminal Justice. 15(2), 211-230
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, JOHN DE BOER and LOUISE BOSETTI, 2017. Going Straight: Criminal Spoilers, Gang Truces and Negotiated Transitions to Lawful Order United Nations University.
  • JAMES COCKAYNE and AMANDA ROTH, 2017. Crooked States: How organized crime and corruption will impact governance in 2050 and what states can - and should - do about it now (9789280890587)
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2016. Hidden Power: The Strategic Logic of Organized Crime Hurst/OUP.
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2016. The anti-slavery potential of international criminal justice Journal of International Criminal Justice. 14(2), 469-484
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2016. Counter-Terrorism and Transnational Crime. In: JACOB KATZ COGAN, IAN HURD and IAN JOHNSTONE, eds., The Oxford Handbook of International Organizations Oxford University Press.
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2016. Confronting Organized Crime and Piracy. In: SEBASTIAN VON EINSIEDEL, DAVID MALONE and BRUNO STAGNO UGARTE, eds., The UN Security Council in the 21st Century Lynne Rienner. 299-322
  • JAMES COCKAYNE and SIOBHAN O'NEIL, eds., 2015. UN DDR in an Era of Violent Extremism: Is it Fit for Purpose? United Nations University.
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2015. Unshackling Development: Why we need a global partnership to end modern slavery (978-92-808-9015-0)
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2014. Private Military and Security Companies. In: ANDREW CLAPHAM and PAOLA GAETA, eds., The Oxford Handbook of International Law in Armed Conflict Oxford University Press. 624-655
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2014. The futility of force?: The futility of force? Strategic lessons for dealing with unconventional armed groups from the UN’s war on Haiti’s gangs Journal of Strategic Studies. 37(5), 736-769
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2013. Wrestling with Shadows: Principled Engagement with Violent Economies and the Repressive Regimes that Rule Them. In: MORTEN PEDERSEN and DAVID KINLEY, eds., Principled Engagement: Negotiating Human Rights in Repressive States Ashgate. 171-198
  • JAMES COCKAYNE and ADAM LUPEL, eds., 2011. Peace Operations and Organised Crime: Enemies or Allies? Routledge.
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2011. Unintended Justice: The United Nations Security Council and the turn to International Criminal Governance. In: ADAM CRAWFORD, ed., International and Comparative Criminal Justice and Urban Governance: Convergence and Divergence in Global, National and Local Settings Cambridge University Press. 41-66
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2009. Beyond Market Forces: Regulating the Global Security Industry International Peace Institute.
  • JAMES COCKAYNE and DAVID MALONE, 2008. Iraq, 1990-1991 and 2002-2003. In: VAUGHAN LOWE, ADAM ROBERTS, JENNIFER WELSH and DOMINIK ZAUM, eds., The Security Council and War 384-405
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2007. The global reorganization of legitimate violence: military entrepreneurs and the private face of international humanitarian law International Review of the Red Cross. 88(863), 1-32
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2005. Hybrids or mongrels?: Internationalized war crimes trials as unsuccessful degradation ceremonies Journal of Human Rights. 4, 1-19
  • 2005. The Fraying Shoestring:: rethinking hybrid war crimes tribunals Fordham Journal of International Law. 28(3), 616-680
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2002. Islam and International Humanitarian Law: From a 'Clash' to a 'Conversation' of Civilizations International Review of the Red Cross. September 2002(847), 597-626
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2001. More Than Sorry: Constructing a Legal Architecture for Practical Reconciliation Sydney Law Review. 23(4),
  • JAMES COCKAYNE, 2001. Members of the Yorta Yorta Aboriginal Community v. Victoria and Ors: Indigenous and Colonial Traditions in Native Title Melbourne University Law Review. 25(3),

School of Politics and International Relations

Law and Social Sciences building
University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

Contact us