Taiwan Studies Programme
   
   
  

Non-Resident Fellows

J Michael Cole

J Michael Cole

jmichaelcoleintaipei@gmail.com

J. Michael Cole is a senior non-resident fellow with the China Policy Institute, University of Nottingham, UK, and associate researcher with the French Centre for Research on Contemporary China. Cole holds an MA in War Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada and was an intelligence officer with the Canadian Security Intelligence Service in Ottawa from 2003-05.

Since his relocation to Taiwan in 2005, he has worked as a deputy news editor at the Taipei Times (2006-13), chief editor of the Thinking Taiwan Foundation's Thinking Taiwan, and is currently chief editor of Taiwan Sentinel. Besides being a regular contributor for CPI Analysis, The National Interest and Jane’s Intelligence Review, his work has appeared in WSJ, China Brief, South China Morning Post, Christian Science Monitor, CNN, the Ottawa Citizen and several other publications.

His latest book, Convergence or Conflict in the Taiwan Strait, was published by Routledge in 2016. Cole specialises on cross-Strait relations, regional security, security intelligence and Chinese political warfare

Expertise

China-U.S.-Taiwan relations; Taiwan Straits military issues; People's Liberation Army; Civil Society-building in Taiwan; U.S. arms sales to Taiwan; Espionage; East China Sea; South China Sea; Asymmetrical Warfare; Counter-Proliferation; Terrorism.

 

Ian Inkster

Ian Inkster

ii1@soas.ac.uk

Inkster is a global historian and political economist focusing especially upon East Asia, Europe and Australasia, with specific archival interest in UK, India, Australia, Taiwan, Japan. He has held Chairs in history, economic history and social sciences in Australia, UK, and Taiwan.

Books include Science and Technology in History (London 1991); The Japanese Industrial Economy. Late Development and Cultural Causation, London, 2001; Japanese Industrialisation. Historical and Cultural Perspectives, London, 2001; with Satofuka, Culture and Technology in Modern Japan London, 2000; Technology and Industrialisation: Historical Case Studies and International Perspectives, London, 1998; Scientific Culture and Urbanisation in Industrialising Britain, London, 1997. Most recent book with James, Religious Dissent and the Aikin-Barbauld circle 1740-1860, Cambridge, 2012. His most recent major article entitled,‘Economy, Technology and the Huttonian Enlightenment: Approaches to China in the International Political Economy since the Early Twentieth Century’, International History Review, XXXVII, 4, (2015), 809-840. Editor of History of Technology, London, since 2000.

Expertise

Global history and international political economy, with especial interests in China, Japan and Taiwan; FRHS elected 1983; editor History of Technology since 2001 (London, Bloomsbury); archival work in Japan, UK, Taiwan, India and Australasia on linkages between knowledge, technology and industrialisation using both comparative techniques and global modelling. Particular Taiwan interests – history of indigenous peoples, the cannibal claims, Taiwan-Chinese relations to present-time, foreign influences in Taiwan history.

 

Gary Rawnsley

Gary Rawnsley

gdr1@aber.ac.uk

Gary Rawnsley is Professor of Public Diplomacy in the Department of International Politics, University of Aberystwyth working at the intersection of international politics and communications. Professor Rawnsley has held visiting positions in Australia, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

He is book reviews editor of the Journal of International Communication and serves on the editorial boards of the Asian Journal of Communication, the American Journal of Chinese Studies and Media and Communication. Professor Rawnsley is also a member of the Soft Power Advocacy and Research Centre at Macquarie University and an External Fellow of the China Policy Institute at the University of Nottingham.

Expertise

International communications in Asia, with particular interest in China and Taiwan; propaganda; public diplomacy and soft power; cultural diplomacy; information warfare; globalisation, regionalisation and localisation of information and culture; democratisation and the media; journalism in China and Taiwan; the history and politics of China and Taiwan.

 

Ming-Yeh Rawnsley

Ming-Yeh Rawnsley

ming-yeh.rawnsley@nottingham.ac.uk

Rawnsley, Ming-yeh T. is Research Associate, Centre of Taiwan Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). She is also Secretary-General, European Association of Taiwan Studies (EATS, 2012-present). She worked as a researcher at the University of Nottingham (1999-2005) and became Head of Chinese Studies at the University of Nottingham Ningbo China (2005-2007). Before she joined SOAS, Dr Rawnsley researched and taught East Asian film industries at the University of Leeds (2007-2013).

She has published widely in both English and Chinese on Chinese-language cinema and media and democratisation in Taiwan. She is a founding member of The International Journal of Taiwan Studies, jointly supported by EATS and Academia Sinica in Taiwan. Her most recent publications include (eds with Gary Rawnsley) Routledge Handbook of Chinese Media (2015) and (eds with Kuei-fen Chiu and Gary Rawnsley) Taiwan Cinema: International Reception and Social Change (2017).

Expertise

Media and Democratisation in Taiwan and China; East Asian Cinema; Taiwan Cinema; Chinese-language Cinema; Trans-disciplinary science communications in Taiwan and in the UK; Literature, Media and Culture of Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau.

 

Michael Reilly

Michael Reilly

michaelreilly012@btinternet.com

Michael Reilly is a former Director of the British Office in Taipei and Chief Representative in China for BAE Systems. He has been affiliated to the CPI as a Senior Fellow since 2015 and in 2016 was a Visiting Fellow at Academia Sinica in Taipei under the Taiwan Fellowship program, studying EU-Taiwan relations.

Expertise

East Asian security; Taiwan; Chinese business policy.

 

Shelley Rigger

Shelley Rigger

shrigger@davidson.edu

Shelley Rigger is the Brown Professor of East Asian Politics, Chair of Chinese Studies and Assistant Dean for Educational Policy at Davidson College and a non-resident fellow of the China Policy Institute at the University of Nottingham. She has a PhD in Government from Harvard University and a BA in Public and International Affairs from Princeton University. She has been a visiting researcher at National Chengchi University (2005) and a visiting professor at Fudan University (2006) and Shanghai Jiaotong University (2013 and 2015).

Rigger is the author of two books on Taiwan's domestic politics, Politics in Taiwan: Voting for Democracy (Routledge 1999) and From Opposition to Power: Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party (Lynne Rienner Publishers 2001). In 2011 she published Why Taiwan Matters: Small Island, Global Powerhouse, a book for general readers. Her monograph, "Taiwan's Rising Rationalism: Generations, Politics and 'Taiwan Nationalism'" was published in November 2006. Currently she is working on a study of Taiwan's contributions to the PRC's economic take-off.

Expertise

Taiwan; Taiwan domestic politics; Cross-strait relations; Democracy in Taiwan; National identity in Taiwan-China relations; Cross-strait economic interations; Taiwan's perceptions of mainland China.

 

Gunter Schubert

Gunter Schubert

gunter.schubert@uni-tuebingen.de

Gunter Schubert is Professor of Greater China Studies at the Institute of Asian and Oriental Studies' Department of Chinese and Korean Studies, University of Tübingen. He is also the founder and director of the European Research Center on Contemporary Taiwan (ERCCT) at this university.

His research covers local governance and policy implementation in the PRC, reform of China's private sector and state-business relations, cross-strait political economy and economic integration, and Taiwan domestic politics. His latest publications include Taiwan and the 'China Impact': challenges and opportunities (ed., London-New York: Routledge 2016) and The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Taiwan (ed,. London-New York: Routledge 2016).

Expertise

Local governance and policy implementation in the PRC, reform of China's private sector and state-business relations, cross-strait political economy and economic integration, and Taiwan domestic politics.

 

David O'Brien

David O'Brien

david.obrien@nottingham.edu.cn

David O'Brien's research is based on many years of qualitative fieldwork and seeks to explore how ethnic identity continues to evolve in China and the interplay between state and individual interpretations of identity. He has become increasingly interested in Taiwan, both in exploring representations of Taiwan's ethnic groups and also Cross-Strait tourism.

Previously he worked as a journalist for an Irish national newspaper reporting on a wide range of topics in Ireland as well as Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands, South Africa, India and Nepal. He has worked and lived in China for a number of years.

Expertise

Ethnic identity and policy, the Chinese political system as well as social science research methodologies in the Chinese context.

 

 

 

Taiwan Studies Programme

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD