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Zoe Trodd

Director of the Rights Lab, a University of Nottingham Beacon of Excellence, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

Zoe Trodd is a Professor in the Department of American and Canadian Studies at the University of Nottingham; Director of the Rights Lab, a university Beacon of Excellence; and Co-Director of the university's research priority area in Rights and Justice. Her focus is strategies for ending slavery, across history and today.

She has a PhD and MA from Harvard University and a first-class BA from the University of Cambridge. Before and after her PhD, she was a Kennedy Fellow at Harvard University, an ACLS/Mellon Fellow, a research fellow at UNC Chapel Hill, and a research fellow at Yale University's Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Abolition and Resistance. Before joining the University of Nottingham as a professor in 2012, she taught at Columbia University.

She is a University of Nottingham Research Leader; a member of the AHRC Peer Review College; and a member of the board of Historians Against Slavery. She edits a book series for Cambridge University Press called Slaveries Since Emancipation and teaches a massive open online course (MOOC) called Ending Slavery. She co-founded the university's Centre for Research in Race and Rights in 2014, and co-directed it until 2017.

Professor Trodd welcomes applications from prospective PhD or MRes students interested in slavery and abolitionism; rights and social justice; protest movements; and photography and visual culture.

She currently supervises the following postgraduate students: Emily Brady (African American Women Photographers); James Brookes (the Visual Culture of the Civil War Soldier); Sophie Campbell (Public Commemorations of Slavery in the 21st-Century UK and US); Patrick Henderson (Jamaican Dancehall in New York City); Charlotte James (the Contested Memory of Black Female Abolitionists); Hannah Jeffery (the Abolitionist Usable Past in Black Power Visual Culture); Hannah-Rose Murray (African American Abolitionists in Britain); Andrea Nicholson (Contemporary Slave Narratives); Timo Schrader (Sustainable Community Activism in New York City); and Olivia Wright (Women's Prison Zines in America).

Research Summary

Professor Trodd has published books about historic and contemporary slavery, the abolitionists Frederick Douglass and John Brown, protest literature, and the civil rights era. She is working on… read more

Selected Publications

  • JOHN STAUFFER, ZOE TRODD and CELESTE-MARIE BERNIER, 2015. Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated Biography of the Nineteenth Century's Most Photographed American W.W. Norton.
  • JOHN STAUFFER and ZOE TRODD, eds., 2012. The Tribunal: Responses to John Brown and the Harpers Ferry Raid Harvard University Press.
  • MAGGI M. MOREHOUSE and ZOE TRODD, eds., 2012. Civil War America: A Social and Cultural History Routledge.
  • KEVIN BALES, ZOE TRODD and ALEX KENT WILLIAMSON, 2011. Modern Slavery: A Beginner's Guide Oneworld.

Current Research

Professor Trodd has published books about historic and contemporary slavery, the abolitionists Frederick Douglass and John Brown, protest literature, and the civil rights era. She is working on several new projects, including a book about the memory of 19th-century abolitionism in the 20th and 21st centuries.

She currently holds an AHRC grant (£1.84 million) called The Antislavery Usable Past (2014-19). This project is unearthing, theorising and applying a usable past of antislavery examples and methods as a tool for policy makers and civil society in the movement to end contemporary global slavery. The grant is one of three awards announced by the AHRC under their 'Care for the Future: Thinking Forward through the Past' theme, which aims to generate new understandings of the relationship between the past and the future. The five year project brings together a team of four professors, three PhD students and two postdoctoral fellows, as well as a number of international partner organisations.

She also holds an ESRC grant (£100,000) called Modern Slavery: Meaning and Measurement (2016-18). This is a study and analysis of how contemporary slavery is defined. It brings the perspective of the antislavery usable past by asking how formerly enslaved people who became antislavery leaders during past abolitionist movements (18th, 19th and 20th century) understood and used definitions (and measurements) of slavery in their autobiographies, speeches, editorials and other antislavery advocacy. The project brings the perspective and participation of contemporary survivors of slavery into the study through collecting new narratives first hand.

For 2016-19 she holds Research Priority Area Development Funding (£299,000) for a project called The Freedom Blueprint. This designs innovative new strategies for the contemporary antislavery movement. There are 46 million people enslaved around the world today. The eradication of slavery by 2030 now appears in the Sustainable Development Goals. But the contemporary antislavery movement lacks robust, evidence-based strategies for abolition. Our multi-part platform of projects and techniques underpins this movement with an advanced and multi-disciplinary research agenda for the first time. Believing that advanced, applied research is key to ending slavery by 2030, our Freedom Blueprint offers interventions that can be replicated and scaled.

In 2016 she curated an exhibition about Frederick Douglass - the largest ever held about this figure - at the Boston African American Museum. It is on view until December 2017.

For her scholarship she has won the Helen Choate Bell Dissertation Prize; the Louis Owens Essay Prize; the William Harris Arnold and Gertrude Weld Arnold Prize (twice); the Boston Ruskin Prize; the Helen Choate Bell Essay Prize (twice); the Agnes Cann Prize; and the Anne Jemima Clough Prize. She was a finalist for the Ralph Henry Gabriel Prize and the Lincoln Prize.

Past Research

In 2016 she held an AHRC Connected Communities Grant for a project called "Draw for the Future." This brought together the university's Centre for Research in Race and Rights, the New Art Exchange and Nottingham Black Archive, to create Nottingham's first black history mural. The four-month project transformed an old wall in the heart of Hyson Green into a vibrant and inspiring piece of public art. It depicts the diverse histories and potential futures of Nottingham's Global Quarter, and explores utopia and community activism.

Previously she has held a British Academy Rising Star Engagement grant (2015-16) on "Race and Rights" that created a base for Race and Rights research and activities, with early career researchers and knowledge exchange partners at its centre. The funded activities included public dialogues between academics and activists on social justice topics at the New Art Exchange and a conference on the Black Lives Matter movement at Nottingham Contemporary.

She also has held a University of Nottingham Discipline Bridging Award (2015-16) for a project called "The Slavery Lens: Interdisciplinary Strategies for Contemporary Abolition." This brought together staff members from multiple departments for a research collaboration to develop an interdisciplinary slavery lens. The year's work included regional network workshops, impact training, student collaboration, roadshow presentations, a conference and NGO, industry and policy seminars. It established an interdisciplinary team, the value of a slavery lens for multiple actors and disciplines, and innovative strategies for the contemporary antislavery movement.

She completed a British Academy-funded project called "Picturing Frederick Douglass" (2013-15), which created a collection of all known Frederick Douglass photographs, for publication as a book by W.W. Norton. Neither Custer nor Twain, nor even Abraham Lincoln, was the most photographed American of the calamitous nineteenth century. It was Frederick Douglass, the ex-slave turned leading abolitionist, eloquent orator, and seminal writer whose fiery speeches transformed him into one of the most renowned and popular agitators of his age. This project reclaims Douglass as a leading pioneer in photography, both as a stately subject and as a prescient theorist who believed in the explosive social power of what was then just an emerging art form. Five years of research uncovered 160 separate photographs of Douglass-many of which have never been publicly seen and were long lost to history.

Other past awards and projects include an AHRC Grant for Exhibition Curating; an AHRC bursary for "Policy Impact Skills for Historians"; a British Academy Landmark Conference grant; the Gilder Lehrman Center's Slavery, Abolition, & Resistance Research Fellowship (Yale University); the Beinecke Library's John D. and Rose H. Jackson Visiting Fellowship (Yale University); the Andrew W. Mellon / American Council of Learned Societies Faculty Fellowship; the Modern Languages Association (North-East) Summer Fellowship; the Research School of Humanities Visiting Fellowship (Australian National University); the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History Research Fellowship; a Historical Society of Southern California Research Grant; a Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History Research Grant (Harvard University); and the Kennedy Memorial Scholarship.

  • ZOE TRODD, 2017. Apostles of Anamnesis: The Abolitionist Aesthetic in Early Anti-Lynching Protest Literature. In: CAROLINE GEBHARD and BARBARA MCCASKILL, eds., African-American Literature in Transition, 1880-1900 Cambridge University Press. (In Press.)
  • ZOE TRODD, 2017. The Abolitionist and the Camera: Frederick Douglass’ Half-Century of Photographs. In: CELESTE-MARIE BERNIER and BILL E. LAWSON, eds., Imaging Frederick Douglass Liverpool University Press. (In Press.)
  • ZOE TRODD, 2017. A Renaissance-Self: Frederick Douglass and the Art of Remaking. In: CHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS, ed., The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of the American Renaissance Cambridge University Press. (In Press.)
  • ZOE TRODD, 2016. The After-Image: Frederick Douglass in Visual Culture. In: CELESTE-MARIE BERNIER and HANNAH DURKIN, eds., Visualising Slavery: Art Across the Black Diaspora Liverpool University Press. 129-152
  • ZOE TRODD, 2016. Towards a Free Europe: Contemporary Slavery and the New Slave Trade. In: Interdisciplinary Studies on Culture and Society, Vol. 10: The ‘In-Between’ Society Nomos. 161-170
  • ZOE TRODD, 2016. Antislaveries Old and New. In: LAURA BRACE and JULIA O’CONNELL DAVIDSON, eds., Slaveries Old and New: The Meaning of Freedom (Proceedings of the British Academy) Oxford University Press / British Academy. (In Press.)
  • ZOE TRODD, 2015. “The Civil Rights Movement and the Literature of Social Protest”. In: JULIE BUCKNER ARMSTRONG, ed., The Cambridge Companion to American Civil Rights Literature Cambridge University Press. 17-34
  • JOHN STAUFFER, ZOE TRODD and CELESTE-MARIE BERNIER, 2015. Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated Biography of the Nineteenth Century's Most Photographed American W.W. Norton.
  • ZOE TRODD, STEFAN GOLD and ALEXANDER TRAUTRIMS, 2015. Modern slavery challenges to supply chain management Supply Chain Management. 20(5), 484-495
  • ZOE TRODD, 2013. “Slavery” and “Human Trafficking". In: VICKI SMITH, ed., Sociology of Work: An Encyclopedia Sage. 399-402, 782-786.
  • KEVIN BALES and ZOE TRODD, 2013. “Addressing Contemporary Forms of Slavery in EU External Policy” European Union. (978-92-823-5154-3)
  • ZOE TRODD, 2013. Star Signals: John Steinbeck in the American Protest Literature Tradition. In: SIMON STOW and CYRUS ERNESTO ZIRAKZADEH, eds., Ambivalent American: A Political Companion to John Steinbeck Kentucky University Press. 49-76
  • ZOE TRODD, 2013. Hannah Bond. In: HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR and EVELYN BROOKS HIGGINBOTHAM, eds., African American National Biography Oxford University Press.
  • ZOE TRODD, 2013. Assessing Characters of Blood; or, What Is Black Heroism in the Transatlantic Imagination? African American Review. 45(4), 495-526
  • ZOE TRODD and CELESTE-MARIE BERNIER, 2013. Introduction: Slavery and Memory in Black Visual Culture Slavery & Abolition. 34(2), 197-201
  • ZOE TRODD, 2013. Introduction to edited roundtable on Celeste-Marie Bernier, Characters of Blood: Black Heroism in the Transatlantic Imagination African American Review. 45(4), 495-96
  • MAGGI M. MOREHOUSE and ZOE TRODD, eds., 2012. Civil War America: A Social and Cultural History Routledge.
  • JOHN STAUFFER and ZOE TRODD, eds., 2012. The Tribunal: Responses to John Brown and the Harpers Ferry Raid Harvard University Press.
  • ZOE TRODD, 2012. “The Legacy of the Abolition Movement". In: HEATHER L. KAUFMAN and JOHN R. MCKIVIGAN, eds., Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements Facts on File.
  • ZOE TRODD, 2012. Review of Leigh Raiford, Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare: Photography and the African American Freedom Struggle Journal for the Study of Radicalism. 6(2), 149-151
  • KEVIN BALES, ZOE TRODD and ALEX KENT WILLIAMSON, 2011. Modern Slavery: A Beginner's Guide Oneworld.
  • ZOE TRODD, 2011. “The Black Press and the Black Chicago Renaissance". In: STEVEN C. TRACY, ed., Writers of the Black Chicago Renaissance University of Illinois Press. 448-464
  • ZOE TRODD, 2011. “American Blueprints: Alternative Declarations and Constitutions in the Protest Tradition". In: AUSTIN SARAT, CATHRINE FRANK and MATTHEW ANDERSON, eds., Teaching Law and Literature Modern Language Association of America Options for Teaching. 436-446
  • NATHANIEL NADDAFF-HAFREY and ZOE TRODD, 2011. “George, They Were Only Movies: The Vietnam Syndrome in Iraq War Culture”. In: CYNTHIA FUCHS and JOE LOCKARD, eds., Iraq War Cultures Peter Lang. 141-159
  • ZOE TRODD, 2011. Review of Marcus Wood, The Horrible Gift of Freedom: Atlantic Slavery and the Representation of Emancipation Journal of American Studies. 45(2), 180-183
  • BRIAN L. JOHNSON and ZOE TRODD, eds., 2010. Conflicts in American History: Volume 7: The Postwar and Civil Rights Era, 1945-1973; Volume 8: Toward the 21st-Century, 1974-Present Facts On File.
  • ZOE TRODD, 2010. "In Possession of Space: Abolitionist Memory and Spatial Transformation in Civil Rights Literature and Photography". In: BRIAN NORMAN and PIPER KENDRIX WILLIAMS, eds., Representing Segregation: The Aesthetics of Living Jim Crow SUNY Press. 223-243
  • ZOE TRODD, 2010. “A Hole Story: The Space of Historical Memory in the Abolitionist Imagination". In: ANNE STOCKDELL-GIESLER, ed., Agency in the Margins: Stories of Outsider Rhetoric Fairleigh Dickinson University Press. 68-90
  • ZOE TRODD, 2010. “Social Reform". In: PHILIP GOFF, ed., The Blackwell Companion to Religion in America Blackwell. 338-352
  • ZOE TRODD, 2010. “Violent Abolitionism: John Brown and the Raid on Harpers Ferry". In: EDWARD J. BLUM and BRIAN L. JOHNSON, eds., Conflicts in American History: The Civil War Era Facts on File. 192-223
  • ZOE TRODD, 2010. “A Different Story: The Chronologies, Creeds, and Conflicts of the Long Civil Rights Movement". In: BRIAN L. JOHNSON and ZOE TRODD, eds., Conflicts in American History: The Postwar and Civil Rights Era Facts on File. xiii-xix
  • ZOE TRODD, 2010. “Black Power and the Black Panther Party". In: BRIAN L. JOHNSON and ZOE TRODD, eds., Conflicts in American History: The Postwar and Civil Rights Era Facts on File. 315-344
  • ZOE TRODD, 2010. “Philip Freneau,” “Seneca Falls Convention,” “Women’s Rights Movement,” “Photography”. In: CHRISTOPHER BATES, ed., Encyclopedia of the Early Republic and Antebellum America M.E. Sharpe. 399-400, 803-805, 909-911, 1109-1110
  • ZOE TRODD, 2010. “Anti-Lynching Campaign,” “Amiri Baraka,” “Black Arts Movement,” “Black Nationalism,” “Slave Resistance,” “Strange Fruit,” “Nat Turner,” “Voting Rights”. In: LESLIE ALEXANDER and WALTER RUCKER, eds., Encyclopedia of African American History ABC-CLIO.
  • KEVIN BALES, ZOE TRODD and ALEX KENT WILLIAMSON, 2009. Modern Slavery: The Secret World of 27 Million People Oneworld.
  • CHRISTOPHER LE CONEY and ZOE TRODD, 2009. “Reagan’s Rainbow Rodeos: Queer Challenges to the Cowboy Dreams of Eighties America” Canadian Review of American Studies. 39(2), 163-183
  • TRODD, Z., 2009. A less costly ink: John Brown’s prison letters and the traditions of American protest literature. In: GAUL, T.S. and HARRIS, S.M., eds., Letters and cultural transformations in the United States, 1760-1860 Ashgate. 197-219
  • ZOE TRODD, 2009. “Vanished Past and Vanishing Point: Charles W. Chesnutt’s Short Stories and the Problem of American Historical Memory". In: DAVID GARRETT IZZO and MARIA ORBAN, eds., Charles Chesnutt Reappraised: Essays on the First Major African American Fiction Writer McFarland. 120-130.
  • ZOE TRODD, 2009. “Passionate Protest: Lynching Photography and Appropriative Counter-Performances". In: MARLENE KADAR, JEANNE PERREAULT and LINDA WARLEY, eds., Photographs, Histories and Meanings Palgrave Macmillan. 185-200
  • ZOE TRODD, 2009. “Justify Me: Walt Whitman in the American Protest Literature Tradition". In: KANWAR DINESH SINGH, ed., The Poetry of Walt Whitman: New Critical Perspectives Atlantic. 32-43
  • ZOE TRODD, 2009. Review of Brian Norman, The American Protest Essay and National Belonging: Addressing Division Journal for the Study of Radicalism. 2(2), 147-149
  • ZOE TRODD, 2009. Review of Robert W. Trogdon, The Lousy Racket: Hemingway, Scribners, and the Business of Literature Studies in the Novel. 41(4), 526-528
  • ZOE TRODD and TIMOTHY PATRICK MCCARTHY, 2009. "Introduction" Journal for the Study of Radicalism. 3(1), vii-x
  • ZOE TRODD, 2009. Hemingway’s Camera-Eye: The Problem of Language and an Interwar Politics of Form. In: HAROLD BLOOM, ed., Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms Infobase. 209-222
  • KEVIN BALES and ZOE TRODD, eds., 2008. To Plead Our Own Cause: Personal Stories by Today's Slaves Cornell University Press.
  • TRODD, Z., 2008. A hid event, twice lived: the post-war narrative sub-versions of Douglass and Melville Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies. 10(2), 51-68
  • ZOE TRODD, 2008. “The Space Between: Ralph Ellison’s Politics of Space and the Reusable Past of Abolitionist Literature". In: ELIZABETH BOYLE and ANNE-MARIE EVANS, eds., Reading America: New Perspectives on the American Novel Cambridge Scholars Press. 63-81
  • ZOE TRODD, 2008. “The Spaces Left: Resistance and Erasure in Frederick Douglass’s Palimpsestic Narratives". In: DARBY LEWES, ed., Double Vision: 18th and 19th-Century Literary Palimpsests Rowman & Littlefield. 239-247
  • ZOE TRODD, 2008. “The Cracks Between: Cinematic and Proto-Cinematic Counter-Memories of the American Civil War". In: CHRISTINA LEE, ed., Violating Time: History, Memory and Nostalgia in Cinema Continuum. 12-25
  • ZOE TRODD, 2008. “A Painful Progress: Queer Fiction and the American Protest Literature Tradition". In: JAY PROSSER, ed., American Fiction of the 1990s: Reflections of History and Culture Routledge. 153-166
  • ZOE TRODD, 2008. “The Calling of Two Creatures: Depression-Era Collaboration and a Theory of Camera and Pen”. In: HOLLY CRAWFORD and LILLIAN FELLMAN, eds., Artistic Bedfellows: Histories, Theories and Conversations in Collaborative Art Practices University Press of America. 14-26
  • ZOE TRODD, 2008. “The Dream of a Common Language: Thoughts on Collaboration and Protest". In: LILLIAN FELLMAN and HOLLY CRAWFORD, eds., Artistic Bedfellows: Histories, Theories and Conversations in Collaborative Art Practices University Press of America. 287-288
  • ZOE TRODD, 2008. “Hannah Crafts,” “Lewis Sheridan Leary,” “Shields Green,” “Madison Washington”. In: HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR. and EVELYN BROOKS HIGGINBOTHAM, eds., African American National Biography Oxford University Press. II.462-464, III.613-614, VIII.141-142
  • ZOE TRODD, 2008. “Amiri Baraka”. In: PATRICIA GANTT, ed., Encyclopedia of Great American Writers Facts on File. 18-29
  • ZOE TRODD, 2008. "Response to John R. Miller: Call It Slavery" The Wilson Quarterly. Autumn, 9-10
  • ZOE TRODD, 2007. "Writ In Blood: John Brown’s Charter of Humanity, The Tribunal of History, and the Thick Link of American Political Protest" Journal for the Study of Radicalism. 1(1), 1-29
  • ZOE TRODD, 2007. "Hemingway’s Camera-Eye: The Problem of Language and an Interwar Politics of Form" Hemingway Review. 26(2), 7-21
  • ZOE TRODD, 2007. "The Body in the Garden: Death, Illness and Inevitability in Literary and Photographic Representations of the Civil War" Interfaces. 135-148
  • ZOE TRODD, 2007. “Guess Who’s Not Coming to Dinner? Cannibalism, Miscegenation and the Greatest Taboo". In: KYLO-PATRICK HART, ed., Mediated Deviance and Social Otherness: Interrogating Influential Representations Cambridge Scholars Press. 217-225
  • ZOE TRODD, 2007. “Cabinets of the Curious: Women-Readers in the 19th Century American Archive and the Search for a Story-Like Life". In: ROBIN HAMMERMAN, ed., Womanhood in Anglophone Literary Culture: 19th and 20th Century Perspectives Cambridge Scholars Press. 2-31
  • ZOE TRODD, 2007. “Keep Rolling: The Irreversible Lines and Reversible Cycles of Depression-Era Image-Texts”. In: BENJAMIN SCHREIER, ed., Studies in Irreversibility Cambridge Scholars Press. 208-229
  • KEVIN BALES and ZOE TRODD, 2007. “All of it is Now”. In: CASSANDRA PYBUS, EMMA CHRISTOPHER and MARCUS REDIKER, eds., Many Middle Passages: Forced Migration and the Making of the Modern World University of California Press. 222-234
  • CHRISTOPHER LE CONEY and ZOE TRODD, 2007. “Sonnet Subtexts and Palatable Stories: Gay Cowboys and the Heterotopian Frontier of Modern-Classic Westerns”. In: PAUL VARNER, ed., Westerns: Paperback Novels and Movies from Hollywood Cambridge Scholars Press. 136-155
  • CHRISTOPHER LE CONEY and ZOE TRODD, 2007. “Straight Shooters, Stainless-Steel Stories and Cowboy Codes: The Queer Frontier and American Identity in a Post-Western World”. In: THOMAS PEELE, ed., Queer Pop Culture: Literature, Media, Film, and Television Palgrave Macmillan. 151-167
  • ZOE TRODD, 2007. Review of Evan Carton, Patriotic Treason: John Brown and the Soul of America New England Quarterly. 80(1), 340-343
  • ZOE TRODD and JOHN STAUFFER, eds., 2006. Meteor of War: The John Brown Story Wiley-Blackwell.
  • ZOE TRODD, ed., 2006. American Protest Literature Harvard University Press.
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. "The Protest Literature of Military Dissent" Peace Review. 18(3), 395-402
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. "Dialogic Man: Ralph Ellison’s Ideal Citizen and the Process of Democratic Conversation" Journal of Contemporary Thought. 23, 19-47
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. "Why Don’t You Get Acquainted With Your Race? ‘The Bookshelf’ and the Making of Black Middlebrow Culture in the 1920s" International Journal of the Humanities. 3(9), 253-261
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. “Interior Designs: Representations of the Creative Process in Nineteenth-Century American Protest Literature". In: DARBY LEWES, ed., Auto-poetica: Fictional Representations of the Creative Process in Nineteenth-Century British and American Fiction Rowman & Littlefield. 203-214
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. “A Theatrical Manager: John Brown and the Radical Politics of the Makeover Mythos". In: DANA HELLER, ed., The Great American Makeover: Television, History, Nation Palgrave MacMillan. 11-31
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. “Hybrid Constructions: Native Autobiography & the Open Curves of Cultural Hybridity”. In: JOPI NYMAN and JOEL KUORTTI, eds., Reconstructing Hybridity: Post-Colonial Studies in Transition Rodopi. 139-162
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. “Vivas to Those Who Have Fail’d: The Politics of Historical Memory in the American Protest Tradition”. In: COLIN DICKEY, ed., Failure: Experiments in Aesthetic and Social Practices Journal of Aesthetics and Protest Press. 163-173
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. “Reading eBay: Hidden Stores, Subjective Stories, and a People’s History of the Archive”. In: KEN HILLIS, MICHAEL PETIT and NATHAN EPLEY, eds., Everyday eBay: Culture, Collecting and Desire Routledge. 77-90
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. “Mosaics and Mirrors: Wiesel, American Autobiographies, and the Shaping of a Storied Subject”. In: ROSEMARY HOROWITZ, ed., Elie Wiesel and the Art of Storytelling McFarland. 15-37
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. “An Open Loop: Cultural Encounter and the Dialogics of Native Autobiography”. In: SURA RATH, K. NIRUPA RANI and V.C. SUDHEER, eds., Dialogics of Cultural Encounters: Nations and Nationalities in Periods of Conflict Pencraft. 243-265
  • NATHANIEL NADDAFF-HAFREY and ZOE TRODD, 2006. “The Turnaround Point: Vietnam Movies, Protest Literature and the Feedback Loop of Contemporary American Identity”. In: LESLIE WILSON, ed., Americana: Readings in Popular Culture Press Americana. 264-278
  • CHRISTOPHER LE CONEY and ZOE TRODD, 2006. “John Wayne and the Queer Frontier: Deconstructions of the Classic Cowboy Narrative during the Vietnam War” Americana: the Journal of American Popular Culture. 5(1), 1-18
  • ZOE TRODD, 2006. “The Scarlet Letter,” “Looking Backward,” “Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man,” “Ragtime,” “Juneteenth”. In: ABBY WERLOCK, ed., The Companion to the American Novel Facts on File. 89-91, 701-702, 786-788, 1092-1093, 1143-1144
  • ZOE TRODD, 2005. "A Fully Collaborative Project: Literary-Photographic Interactions and Narrative Continuity during the Great Depression" Interactions. 14(2), 171-199
  • ZOE TRODD, 2005. “Three Fatal Questions: Ralph Ellison’s Democratic Conversation”. In: CHRISTA BUSCHENDORF, ed., Artists, Intellectuals and the Challenge of Political Commitment Center for North American Studies. 128-144
  • ZOE TRODD and JOHN STAUFFER, 2005. “The John Brown Cycle: Meteor of War”. In: ELDRID HERRINGTON and ANDREW TAYLOR, eds., The Afterlife of John Brown Palgrave Macmillan. 121-144
  • ZOE TRODD, 2005. “Hannah Crafts” and “Harriet Jacobs”. In: EMMANUEL S. NELSON, ed., Encyclopedia of Multiethnic American Literature Greenwood. 510-511, 1113-1115
  • ZOE TRODD, 2005. “Ottie B. Graham”. In: J. DAVID MACEY and HANS OSTROM, eds., Encyclopedia of African American Literature Greenwood. 96-97
  • ZOE TRODD, 2004. “Don’t Speak Dearest It Will Make You Worse: The Bondwoman’s Narrative, the Afro-American Literary Tradition and the Trope of the Lying Book”. In: HENRY LOUIS GATES JR. and HOLLIS ROBBINS, eds., In Search of Hannah Crafts Basic Books. 295-312

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