School of Economics
 

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Anna Hochleitner

PhD Student,

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Biography

During my undergraduate I studied International Cultural and Business Studies as well as Business Administration and Economics at the University of Passau. As I found the economics modules particularly interesting, I then decided to apply for a double degree Master in Economics offered jointly by the Universities of Nottingham and Konstanz with a focus on Development and Behavioural Economics. The experiences during the MSc and in particular writing my dissertation furthered my interest in academic research, which ultimately led me to return to Nottingham and start my PhD in 2018. I am planning to submit my thesis in spring 2023.

Teaching Summary

So far my teaching has mainly focused on mathematics and econometrics for undergraduate students. I have been teaching "Quantitative Economics/ Methods", "Mathematical Economics & Econometrics"… read more

Research Summary

My main research interest is Behavioural Economics, including both lab and field environments. In particular I am interested in the emergence and persistence of inequality and its impact on… read more

So far my teaching has mainly focused on mathematics and econometrics for undergraduate students. I have been teaching "Quantitative Economics/ Methods", "Mathematical Economics & Econometrics" as well as "Applied Econometrics". Besides econometric courses, I have been teaching "Politics of Economics & Economics of Politicians".

In the upcoming year I am going to give Qualtrics and computer classes for the Economics Dissertation module. I am also interested in teaching microeconomic or behavioural courses in the future.

Current Research

My main research interest is Behavioural Economics, including both lab and field environments. In particular I am interested in the emergence and persistence of inequality and its impact on preferences and individual decision making. In addition to Behavioural Economics, I am interested in Development Economics and Microeconomic Theory.

In my job market paper, I explore how income inequality, and the experience of negative income shocks, affect an individual's fairness views and preferences for redistribution. To do so, I manipulate shocks and income differences experimentally and test their effect on allocation decisions. I find that reactions to shocks depend on participants' relative income. Participants who are relatively poorer exhibit little reaction to shocks and distribute resources in line with an egalitarian fairness view. Participants who are relatively richer, by contrast, distribute resources proportionate to individual contributions and are quite responsive to shocks. They allocate more to themselves if they suffered a shock, but less if the other faced a shock. In a follow-up study, I capitalise on the recent Covid-19 crisis and investigate the behaviour of subjects hit by real world income shocks. The results confirm that negative shocks affect redistributive preferences with participants allocating more to individuals who suffered the Covid-19 shock.

In another project, my co-authors and I explore how unequal conventions can emerge between two groups in a lab stetting and how their stability is affected by changes in inequality. We find that overall inequality has a destabilising effect, with deviations from the convention being initialised by the disadvantaged group.

In addition to my focus on status differences and inequality, I am also very interested in how norms shape individual behaviour. When analysing norms, previous research has often focused on average behaviour. I am working with a group of co-authors on how incorporating the variance of a descriptive norm (its "tight- or looseness") as well as its shape ("polarised or single-peaked") can help to develop a better understanding of when and how norms impact our behaviour. In a strategic setting, we find that individuals indeed strongly respond to differences in the variance and shape of the descriptive norm they are facing: loose norms generate greater behavioural variance and polarisation generates polarised responses. Moreover, we find an interaction between environment and the impact of personal traits on behaviour. They matter more in polarised and loose environments.

School of Economics

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University of Nottingham
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Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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