School of Economics
  

New Staff

The School of Economics is delighted to welcome the following new colleagues this year.

Professors

Martin Jensen

Martin Jensen

Martin is a macroeconomic theorist but also works on game theory (mostly on aggregative games) and a variety of other theoretical topics. Current research interests include behavioural growth models, distributional comparative statics and functional diversity.

 
Adrien Vigier

Adrien Vigier

Adrien is a microeconomist, mostly in the field of information economics. Current research mainly focuses on the workings of financial markets.

 

Associate Professors

Toomas Hinnosaar

Toomas Hinnosaar

Tommas’ research interests include Microeconomic theory, mechanism design and applied microeconomics.

 
Rahul Mukherjee

Rahul Mukherjee

Rahul’s areas of expertise include foreign direct investment, dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models of international business cycles and portfolio allocation, the macroeconomics of labour markets, and emerging economies.

 
Gregory Thwaites

Gregory Thwaites

Gregory has broad theoretical and empirical research interests in the macroeconomics of demographic and structural change, macroeconomic policy, financial stability, and inequality and distribution.  

 

Assistant Professors

Alejandro Graziano

Alejandro Graziano

Alejandro works on international trade, with a focus on trade policy and the role of market structures.

 
Marit Hinnosaar

Marit Hinnosaar

Marit’s research is in empirical industrial organization and digital economics, studying consumer behaviour in the grocery market, including topics related to the demand for healthy and unhealthy foods, the demand for alcohol, and the health consequences of public policies. Research in digital economics uses experiments to measure contributions to online public goods and the real-world impact of online information repositories such as Wikipedia.

 
Michael Poyker

Michael Poyker

Michael’s research interests focus primarily on cultural norms and social justice.
Research areas include applied microeconomics, political economy, and development.

 
Devesh Rustagi

Devesh Rustagi

Devesh’s research falls largely at the intersection of development economics and political economy - studying the origins and stability of civic values and institutions, how these forces interact, and the effect this interaction has on economic outcomes. He then builds on these insights to design and evaluate public policies, achieved by combining quasi-experimental approaches and randomized field experiments with behavioural experiments. Current projects are based in Ethiopia, India, Nepal, and Switzerland.

 
Yuan Tian

Yuan Tian

Yuan joins us following a postdoctoral fellowship at Carnegie Mellon University. Her research interests are applied micro, trade and development.

 
Dario Tortarolo

Dario Tortarolo

Dario’s fields of interest are Public Finance and Labour Economics. His research mainly focuses on behavioural responses of workers and businesses to tax and transfer policies, with a special interest in developing countries. He currently studies intertemporal labour supply responses of high-wage earners to income taxation; the wage effects of means-tested transfers that are disbursed by employers. In another set of projects, he explores tax evasion of firms and self-employed workers and assesses the role of tax preparers in mediating those responses.    

 
Juan Ignacio Vizcaino

Juan Ignacio Vizcaino

Nacho studies growth and development issues from a macro perspective, using micro and aggregate data. Primary areas of interest are structural transformation, growth, development, and human capital.

 

Research Fellows

Anwar Adem

Anwar Adem

Anwar joins us as a post-doc on an ESRC research grant, working with Richard Kneller and Chi Li (NUBS) on the project: Productivity Outcomes of workplace Practice, Engagement and Learning.

 
Ingo Outes

Ingo Outes

Ingo’s research is focused on poverty, nutrition, and child development, and spans the fields of economics, education and psychology. During the Fellowship, he will continue his research into the potential of psychosocial interventions in education and other psychological activation tools as scalable cost-effective policies capable of reducing educational inequalities in the Global South.

 

 

School of Economics

Sir Clive Granger Building
University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

Contact us