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Featured Publications

Is poor financial literacy a barrier to home ownership?Is poor financial literacy a barrier to home ownership?

In this publication, published in the Journal of Urban Economics, John Gathergood and Joerg Weber use survey data from British households to measure financial literacy. They found that financial literacy with respect to understanding mortgages is generally low in the population, and lower still among renters. Financial literacy predicts home ownership for young homeowners, and young people with poor financial literacy are more likely to take on larger debts and use alternative mortgage products.
 

From mine to coast From mine to coast: Transport infrastructure and the direction of trade in developing countries

In this publication in the Journal of Development Economics, Roberto Bonfatti and Steven Poelhekke find that the infrastructure developed to connect mines to the coast also lowers the cost of trading other goods with overseas countries compared to trading overland with neighbouring countries. Their findings have important implications for optimal investment in Africa's transport infrastructure, particularly at a time in which Chinese investments seem to be re-inforcing Africa's interior-to-coast networks.
 

Is Chinese trade policy motivated by environmental concerns?Is Chinese trade policy motivated by environmental concerns?

In this publication in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Sabrina Eisenbarth – formerly a Nottingham Economics PhD student and now postdoctoral fellow at the University of Oxford - analyses whether China's export VAT rebates and export taxes are driven by environmental concerns, given its struggles to enforce environmental regulation.
 

Credence Goods, Costly Diagnosis, and Subjective Evaluation Credence goods, costly diagnosis, and subjective evaluation

In this publication in the Economic Journal, Helmut Bester and Matthias Dahm analyse optimal contracts between a consumer and an expert in a credence good model when the expert's diagnostic effort is subject to moral hazard and payments depend on the consumer’s subjective evaluation for the good.
 

Trade, firm selection, and innovation: the competition channel Trade, firm selection, and innovation: the competition channel

In this publication in the Economic Journal, Giammario Impullitti and Omar Licandro present an analysis of the welfare gains originating from pro-competitive effects of trade liberalization in an economy with heterogeneous firms, variable markups and endogenous growth.
 

Information rigidities and the news-adjusted output gapInformation rigidities and the news-adjusted output gap

In this publication in the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Kevin Lee, Tony Garratt and Kalvinder Shields describe a method for isolating the ‘news content’ of published output data and of surveys on expected future output. This is then used to construct an output ‘gap’ measure showing output relative to trend but purged of fluctuations that are known to be very short-lived.
 

Protecting buyers from fine printProtecting buyers from fine print

In this publication in the European Economic Review, Elena D'Agostino and Daniel J. Seidmann examine a model in which buyers do not read the fine print in contracts and trade is inefficient. More interestingly, regulations which prohibit the least efficient terms may reduce welfare.
 

Religion, discrimination and trust across three culturesReligion, discrimination and trust across three cultures

In this paper published in the special issue on Social Identity in the European Economic Review, Swee Hoon Chuah, Simon Gächter, Robert Hoffmann, and Jonathan Tan establish the willingness of people to discriminate across a wide variety of cultural and demographic markers, and opens up a discussion of group effects from the interplay of various cultural markers.
 

Motivation, resources and the organization of the school systemMotivation, resources and the organisation of the school system

In this publication in the Journal of the European Economic Association, Facundo Albornoz, Sami Berlinski and Antonio Cabrales develop a model of education where student effort and talent interact with parental and teachers' investments, as well as with school system resources. They show how further understanding and awareness of the behavioural responses to changes in education policy is essential for an accurate evaluation of their effects.
 

Public spending and growth: The role of government accountabilityPublic spending and growth: The role of government accountability

In this publication in the European Economic Review, Atsuyoshi Morozumi and Francisco José Veiga examine the role of institutions in the nexus between public spending and economic growth.
 

Survival in Export MarketsSurvival in export markets

In this publication in the Journal of International Economics, Facundo Albornoz, Sebastian Fanelli and Juan Carlos Hallak develop a model of exporter dynamics to study theoretically and quantitatively the probability of survival upon entry in new export markets. They show the relevance of distinguishing between fixed and sunk costs, highlight the role of distance and previous export experience and discuss how these results should impose discipline to the plethora of recent quantitative estimates of export costs appearing in the literature.
 

How Firms ExportHow firms export: Processing vs. ordinary trade with financial frictions

In this publication in the Journal of International Economics, Kalina Manova and Zhihong Yu study how financial frictions affect companies' choice between performing only intermediate stages of production by processing imported inputs for re-exporting versus making and exporting final goods and how this decision affects performance.
 

Dynamic Bargaining and Stability with Veto PlayersDynamic bargaining and stability with veto players

This paper by Vincent Anesi and John Duggan on dynamic bargaining has been selected by the Editors of Games and Economic Behavior for inclusion in the John Nash Memorial Special Issue.
 

Moral consequences of becoming unemployedMoral consequences of becoming unemployed

In this publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Abigail Barr, Luis Miller and Paloma Ubeda present evidence that when people become unemployed they cease to acknowledge earned entitlement.
 

Intrinsic Honesty and the Prevalence of Rule Violations across SocietiesIntrinsic honesty and the prevalence of rule violations across societies

In this publication in Nature, Simon Gaechter and Jonathan Schulz present cross-societal experiments from 23 countries around the world and find that people from more corrupt societies were likely to be more dishonest in an anonymous experimental task than those from societies where rule-breaking is frowned upon.
 

 

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