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Featured Publications

Tests of the co-integration rank in VAR models in the presence of a possible break in trend at an unknown pointTests of the co-integration rank in VAR models in the presence of a possible break in trend at an unknown point

In this publication in the Journal of Econometrics, David Harris, Stephen Leybourne and Robert Taylor consider the problem of testing for the co-integration rank of a vector autoregressive process in the case where a trend break may potentially be present in the data and develop a number of procedures which deliver asymptotically correctly sized and consistent tests of the co-integration rank.
 

A Theoretical Analysis of Public Funding for ResearchA theoretical analysis of public funding for research

In this publication in the RAND Journal of Economics, Gianni De Fraja studies the best way to allocate taxpayers' money to scientific research. The analysis is theoretical, and it builds a number of normative consequences which the allocation, which in practice amounts to around 1% of GDP in OECD countries, should satisfy in order to conform to the economic principle of efficiency.
 

Tax Policy and the Financing of InnovationsTax policy and the financing of innovations

In this publication in the Journal of Public Economics, Luis Bryce, Roberto Bonfatti and Luigi Pisano argue that, if innovators face credit constraints in the financing of innovation, a tax policy that aims to increase the overall level of innovation should focus not so much on reducing profit taxes, but on reducing labor taxes. Substituting labor income and profit taxes for consumption taxes, ie. fundamental tax reform, more decidedly boosts technological research.
 

Social motives in intergroup conflict: Group identity and perceived target of threatSocial motives in intergroup conflict: Group identity and perceived target of threat

In this publication in the European Economic Review, Ori Weisel and Ro'i Zultan study the determinants of costly individual contributions towards intergroup conflict by experimentally studying behaviour in a novel intergroup conflict game, the Asymmetric Intergroup Prisoner's Dilemma.
 

The Longevity of Famous People from Hammurabi to Einstein

The longevity of famous people from Hammurabi to Einstein

In this publication in the Journal of Economic Growth, David de la Croix and Omar Licandro build a new sample of 300,000 famous people born between Hammurabi's epoch and Einstein's cohort, including their vital dates. The authors show that there was no trend in mortality during most of human history, and date the beginning of the steady improvements in longevity to the cohort born in 1640-9, clearly preceding the Industrial Revolution.
 

Imported Inputs and Invoicing Currency Choice Imported inputs and invoicing currency choice: Theory and evidence from UK transaction data

In this publication in the Journal of International Economics, Wanyu Chung investigates theoretically and empirically how exporters' dependence on imported inputs affects their choice of invoicing currency.
 

Investment liberalisation, technology take-off and export markets entry Investment liberalisation, technology take-off and export markets entry: Does foreign ownership structure matter?

In this publication in the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Sourafel Girma, Yundan Gong, Holger Görg and Sandra Lancheros exploit episodes of investment liberalisation in China to identify the causal effects of foreign acquisitions on export markets entry and technology take-off, and to evaluate whether the level of foreign ownership plays a role in stimulating these changes.
 

Majoritarian Blotto Contests with Asymmetric Battlefields Majoritarian blotto contests with asymmetric battlefields: An experiment on Apex games

In this publication in Economic Theory, Maria Montero, Alex Possajennikov, Martin Sefton and Ted Turocy study contests where two players simultaneously allocate resources across battlefields, battlefields may have different values and a player wins by capturing battlefields of greater total value than the opponent.
 

Estimating the effects of the container revolution on world trade Estimating the effects of the container revolution on world trade

In this publication in the Journal of International Economics, Richard Kneller, Daniel Bernhofen and Zouheir El-Sahli investigate the effects of the container revolution on world trade.
 

Tariffs, Trade and Productivity Tariffs, trade and productivity: A quantitative evaluation of heterogeneous firm models

In this publication in the Economic Journal, Holger Breinlich and Alejandro Cunat evaluate whether the current generation of heterogeneous firm trade models can be used for forecasting the effects of trade agreements, and what modifications are needed to improve their performance.
 

The Collaborative Roots of Corruption The collaborative roots of corruption

In this publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Ori Weisel and Shaul Shalvi study "corrupt collaboration" and show that collaboration, particularly on equal terms, can be extremely prone to corruption, suggesting that human cooperative tendencies, and not merely greed, take part in shaping corruption.
 

The Costs and Benefits of Coordinating with a Different Group The costs and benefits of coordinating with a different group

In this publication in the Journal of Economic Theory, Paul Grout, Sebastien Mitraille and Silvia Sonderegger study a model of social interactions and show that diversity (ie. randomly mixing people of different groups) generates costs but may also (surprisingly) generate benefits in the form of enhanced coordination.
 

Globalization and Wage Polarization Globalization and wage polarization

In this publication in the Review of Economics and Statistics, Guido Cozzi and Giammario Impullitti analyse the effects of globalization on functional and personal income inequality in a Schumpeterian model of endogenous technological progress with two asymmetric countries, heterogeneous workers, endogenous skill formation and occupational choice.
 

Economic status and acknowledgement of earned entitlement Economic status and acknowledgement of earned entitlement

In this publication in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Abigail Barr, Justine Burns, Luis Miller, and Ingrid Shaw report on a series of experiments aiming to improve our understanding of the relationship between economic status and acknowledgement of earned entitlement.
 

Trust, Trustworthiness and the Consensus Effect: An Evolutionary Approach Trust, trustworthiness and the consensus effect: An evolutionary approach

In this publication in the European Economic Review, Silvia Sonderegger and her co-author Fabrizio Adriani present a theoretical model in which people use introspection to form beliefs about others and show that a polymorphic equilibrium where both trustworthy and opportunists coexist may be evolutionary stable.
 

 

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