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Featured Publications

A Carrot and Stick Approach to Agenda-Setting A carrot and stick approach to agenda-setting

In this publication in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Matthias Dahm and Amihai Glazer model a legislature and investigate the power of promises and threats that the agenda setter can use when he persistently controls proposals.
 

Bond Spreads as Predictors of Economic Activity in Eight European Economies Bond spreads as predictors of economic activity in eight European economies

In this publication in the Economic Journal, Michael Bleaney, Paul Mizen and Veronica Veleanu provide new insights into the relationship between financial market tightness and real activity using a new database of corporate bonds issued in eight European countries.
 

With a Little Help from My Friends? Quality of Social Networks, Job Finding and Job Match Quality With a little help from my friends? Quality of social networks, job finding and job match quality

In this publication in the European Economic Review, Lorenzo Cappellari and Konstantinos Tatsiramos present new evidence on the effect of network quality, measured by the employment status of friendship ties, on job finding and job match quality.
 

Public debt and growth: Heterogeneity and non-linearity Public debt and growth: Heterogeneity and non-linearity

In this publication in the Journal of International Economics, Markus Eberhardt and Andrea F. Presbitero show that higher debt is detrimental to growth, but there is no evidence for common thresholds in the debt-growth nexus across countries.
 

Bargaining in Standing Committees with an Endogenous Default B argaining in standing committees with an endogenous default

In this publication in the Review of Economic Studies, Vincent Anesi and Daniel J. Seidmann consider how bargaining proceeds if today’s agreement is tomorrow's default.
 

One Swallow Doesn't Make a Summer: New Evidence on Anchoring Effects One swallow doesn't make a summer: New evidence on anchoring effects

In this publication in The American Economic Review, Zacharias Maniadis, Fabio Tufano and John A. List present new evidence exploring the robustness of certain anchoring effects in economic valuations. They then proceed by providing theoretical arguments about why scholars should be generally cautious of initial empirical findings.
 

Participatory Accountability and Collective Action: Experimental evidence from Albania Participatory accountability and collective action: Experimental evidence from Albania

In this publication in The European Economic Review, Abigail Barr, Truman Packard, and Danila Serra explore the relationship between Albanian citizens' behaviour in a very simple version of a game widely used in economic experiments and their inclination to turn out to vote in national elections and in the election of parent representatives to school-related committees.
 

Estimating direct and indirect effects of foreign direct investment on firm productivity in the presence of interactions between firms Estimating direct and indirect effects of foreign direct investment on firm productivity in the presence of interactions between firms

In this publication in the Journal of International Economics, Sourafel Girma, Yundan Gong, Holger Görg and Sandra Lancheros offer a causal analysis of the direct effects of foreign-ownership on foreign firms' productivity and the indirect effects (or spillovers) from the presence of foreign-owned firms on other foreign and domestic firms' productivity in a unifying framework, taking interactions between firms into account.
 

Self-Control, Financial Literacy and the Co-Holding Puzzle Self-control, financial literacy and the co-holding puzzle

In this publication in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organisation, John Gathergood and Jorg Weber examine why some consumers hold large expensive debts while also holding low-interest liquid savings at the same time and do not save money by using their savings to pay off their debts.
 

The Meta Taylor Rule The Meta Taylor Rule

In this publication in the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Kevin Lee, James Morley and Kalvinder Shields describe a new modelling technique which delivers a simple but compelling description of how monetary policy in the US has changed over the last forty years.
 

Migration and imperfect labour markets: Theory and cross-country evidence from Denmark, Germany and the UK Migration and imperfect labour markets: Theory and cross-country evidence from Denmark, Germany and the UK

In this publication in the European Economic Review, Herbert Brücker, Andreas Hauptmann, Elke J. Jahn and Richard Upward investigate the labour market effects of immigration in Denmark, Germany and the UK, three countries which are characterized by differences in their labour market institutions and welfare states.
 

Preferences, rent destruction and multilateral liberalisation: the building block effect of CUSFTA Preferences, rent destruction and multilateral liberalisation: the building block effect of CUSFTA

In this publication in the Journal of International Economics, Tobias D. Ketterer, Daniel Bernhofen and Chris Milner report on research showing that the Canadian-US Free Trade Agreement was a "building block" for multilateral tariff cuts during the subsequent Uruguay Round of trade negotiations, with preferential exchange of market access reducing rents and resistance to multilateral tariff cuts.
 

Credit Constraints and Spillovers from Foreign Firms in China Credit constraints and spillovers from foreign firms in China

In this publication in the Journal of Banking and Finance, Natasha Agarwal, Chris Milner and Alejandro Riaño find that credit constraints constitute a considerable barrier to the absorption of productivity spillovers originating from the activity of foreign-owned firms for Chinese manufacturing firms.
 

Risky Choice in the Limelight Risky choice in the limelight

In this publication in the Review of Economics and Statistics, Guido Baltussen, Martijn J. van den Assem, and Dennie van Dolder examine how risk behaviour in the limelight differs from that in anonymity. In two experiments they find that subjects are substantially more risk averse in the limelight, but that the qualitative patterns in risk behaviour are the same under both conditions.
 

Confidence sets for the date of a break in level and trend when the order of integration is unknown Confidence sets for the date of a break in level and trend when the order of integration is unknown

In this publication in the Journal of Econometrics, David I. Harvey and Stephen J. Leybourne propose methods for constructing confidence sets for the timing of a break in level and/or trend that have asymptotically correct coverage for both I(0) and I(1) processes.
 

 

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