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Georgie Lucas

Teaching Associate in Early Modern Literature, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

I joined the University of Nottingham in 2017, having worked previously at Bath Spa University and Swansea University. I took my BA in English and French at the University of Warwick, before moving to The Shakespeare Institute (University of Birmingham) to read for an MA in Shakespeare Studies. I stayed at the Institute for my PhD, which explored the meaning and representation of massacres on the early modern stage.

Expertise Summary

I specialise in early modern drama and performance. I am primarily interested in the relationship between early modern drama and violence, particularly mass and sexual violence.

My article on the intersection between rape and massacre in the anonymous Elizabethan play Alarum for London will be published by Early Theatre in December 2017. This will be followed in 2018 by a book chapter in English Renaissance Drama and the Politics of Domesticity (Manchester University Press, eds. Sheeha and Price) that explores ideas of the domestic in Christopher Marlowe's The Massacre at Paris.

Beyond this, I am writing a monograph, provisionally entitled Massacre in Early Modern Drama. The book will provide the first full-length study to examine the conceptualisation and embodiment of massacre on the early modern stage, overturning orthodoxies about the supposed 'senselessness' of this kind of violence. This interdisciplinary study covers a 100-year period, spanning plays from the late Medieval to Restoration periods.

My other main field of research lies in performance studies. I have published reviews in Shakespeare Bulletin, Cahiers Élisabéthains, and A Year of Shakespeare: Re-Living the World Shakespeare Festival (London: Bloomsbury, 2012). I worked as Research Assistant on The Year of Shakespeare project and served as Text Assistant to Gregory Doran, Artistic Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company while he developed his 2016 production of King Lear. In 2016, I co-led a seminar on 'Shakespeare and Television' with Dr Sarah Olive (York) for the World Shakespeare Congress.

Teaching Summary

I teach on the following undergraduate modules: Q33398 Reformation and Revolution (convenor); Q3109S Shakespeare's Histories; Q32330 Shakespeare and Contemporaries on the Page; Q31314 Studying… read more

Research Summary

My main research explores the complex web of meanings constructed by and around the language and action of massacre on the early modern stage. I am currently developing this research into a book:… read more

Recent Publications

  • GEORGIE LUCAS, 2018. ‘Domestic Politics in The Massacre at Paris’. In: EOIN PRICE and IMAN SHEEHA, eds., English Renaissance Drama and the Politics of Domesticity Manchester University Press. (In Press.)
  • 2017. Rape, Massacre, The Lucrece Tradition, and Alarum for London Early Theatre. (In Press.)

I teach on the following undergraduate modules: Q33398 Reformation and Revolution (convenor); Q3109S Shakespeare's Histories; Q32330 Shakespeare and Contemporaries on the Page; Q31314 Studying Literature; Q3102S English Literature History (Convenor); Q33604 Songs and Sonnets; Q33391 The Self and the World: Writing in the Long Eighteenth Century; Q32502 Shakespeare and Contemporaries on the Stage; and Q3108S Regional Writers.

My MA teaching spans Q34542 Literary Histories; Q34547 Early Performance Cultures; and Q34541 Speculative Fictions.

Current Research

My main research explores the complex web of meanings constructed by and around the language and action of massacre on the early modern stage. I am currently developing this research into a book: Massacres in Early Modern Drama. Informed by current theories from massacre studies, a field recently emerged from the adjacent school of genocide studies, the book argues that massacres result from, and provoke, a range of intensely meaningful strategies and actions. They may be functionally messy, psychologically confounding, and morally abhorrent, but they are rarely senseless. Rather, the monograph maintains that part of what makes massacres so tricky to determine and interpret is that the meanings they indicate, or to which they are ascribed, are often ambivalent. The project attests to this instability by exploring the ways in which massacres expose the contingency of three different concepts: humanness, statehood, and the ethics and formations of military encounter. In doing so, the monograph argues that early modern drama formed part of a continual cultural process of trying to piece together this prismatic and contentious phenomenon.

Future Research

My plans for future research in this area include a study on war in plays by John Fletcher, and a re-evaluation of the representation of women in warfare on the early modern stage.

  • GEORGIE LUCAS, 2018. ‘Domestic Politics in The Massacre at Paris’. In: EOIN PRICE and IMAN SHEEHA, eds., English Renaissance Drama and the Politics of Domesticity Manchester University Press. (In Press.)
  • 2017. Rape, Massacre, The Lucrece Tradition, and Alarum for London Early Theatre. (In Press.)

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