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Jacqueline Cordell

Research Fellow in Corpus Linguistics, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

I am a corpus linguist and stylistician working on the intersection of corpus stylistics and historical text studies. Prior to my current position, I worked at DeMonfort University from October 2015 as a part-time lecturer in the Department of English Language. During that time, while finishing my PhD, I worked as a Teaching Affiliate in the School of English at Nottingham from October 2015 to May 2017.

I hold a PhD in Applied Linguistics (University of Nottingham), an MA in Literary Linguistics (University of Nottingham), and a BA in Linguistics & English Literature (University of New Hampshire, USA).

Teaching Summary

Part-Time Lecturer, De Montfort University, 2015-2019, workshops in Evolving Language: an introduction to histories of language, Language and Power, and Sociolinguistics

Teaching Affiliate, University of Nottingham, 2015-2017, seminars in Language & Context

I have also supervised undergraduate dissertations on topics in language and gender studies, characterization, (historical) dialectology, and social media discourses.

Research Summary

My current role on the EPSRC-funded STEMM-CHANGE project utilises corpus methods to reveal language patterns of exclusion that, even if unintentional, can encode discrimination and bias. This… read more

Current Research

My current role on the EPSRC-funded STEMM-CHANGE project utilises corpus methods to reveal language patterns of exclusion that, even if unintentional, can encode discrimination and bias. This research is anticipated to generate empirical evidence pinpointing examples of language-driven bias in the STEMM career cycle by designing and analysing corpora of language generated - and encountered - during the recruitment, retention, and career progression of STEMM academics.

Past Research

My doctoral research examines the relationship between linguistic form and literary function in the lexical patterns contained in the Middle English narrative poem Piers Plowman. This approach draws on quantitatively-established text features and patterns in corpus linguistics that, when placed within theoretical frameworks in literary linguistics, offer a point of departure for analysing aspects of the text's literary style. Of particular interest has been exploring how orthographic annotation is able to reduce noise in the generated corpus data, to what extent has it been effective, and how these approaches could be integrated into efforts geared towards historical literary corpus creation in future research.

School of English

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