School of English
   
   
  

External Funding

research-projects
The School of English embraces a wide spectrum of specialisms and interdisciplinary areas
 

The School has been successful in securing the following externally funded research projects:

Prof. Judith Jesch

The Saga of the Earls of Orkney

The British Academy/ The Leverhulme Small Research Grant

01.09.2019-31.08.2019

£5105

Professor Judith Jesch (Centre for the Study of the Viking Age)

The award is for research expenses relating to my new project, a new and fully annotated translation of Orkneyinga saga. The award will enable me to visit manuscript archives in Copenhagen and Reykjavík, as well as doing fieldwork and making museum and site visits in Caithness, Orkney and Shetland.
JaiMackenzie

Marginalised Families Online: Exploring the role of digital media for parents in diverse family groups

The British Academy

03/03/2018-02/03/2021
£240,232.33

The Marginalised Families Online project will explore the role that digital (online and mobile) media such as messaging apps, discussion forums, social networks and blogs, play in the lives of marginalised family groups in the UK. It focuses on parents who are LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender), adoptive, and/or solo (raising children on their own).

The project aims to give a voice to families who tend to be under-represented in both an academic and broader social context, and to highlight some of the challenges they face. It uses innovative methods (drawing on sociological, linguistic and digital approaches and tools) to forge new understanding of the way parents navigate their roles, relationships and experiences in relation to social norms around gender, sexuality and the family. By focusing on the intersections between the experiences of LGBT, solo and adoptive parents, the project seeks to understand and address issues that relate to a range of diverse families.

Lucy Jones

Language and LGBT identity: Exploring the marginalisation of young people

British Academy/Leverhulme Small Research Grant

01/10/2018-30/09/2020
£7,173

Dr Lucy Jones ( Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics)

A major focus of my research is on formulaic language. For example, English speakers say that things go together like “bread and butter” not like “butter and bread”. While linguistic patterns such as these account for up to half of spoken discourse, they are a relatively under-researched phenomenon. I investigate how input in a second language relates to adults’ acquisition and processing of formulaic sequences. Research at the Language Development Department (LaDD) at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics focuses on how children’s learning mechanisms exploit language input to develop linguistic knowledge. I have been awarded a ten month Leverhulme International Fellowship to work to bring insights from first and second language acquisition together, which will enable new and broader explanations of input driven language development, while also demonstrating the value of addressing fundamental questions about acquisition by bringing together experts who normally work apart – those on child and adult language development. 

ChristinaLee19b

Nettles & Networks: New Ways to tackle Wound Infection

Royal Society / British Academy Apex Award

01/11/2018-31/08/2020
£92,405.23

Dr Christina Lee  (Centre for the Study of the Viking Age)

This project focuses on remedies for wound infections that include nettles (Urtica spp.) in their ingredients. These remedies are concentrated in surgical texts and hunting manuals (in reference to infected bites from dogs), as well as in medical texts for physicians. The project examines exactly how medieval texts use nettles: how specific are the medical contexts in which they are used, and are they repeatedly combined with particular partner ingredients? Further, do usage patterns correlate to evidence-based usage of nettles in ways that produce effective treatments against the bacteria that commonly infect wounds? Our objective is to develop a new direction of collaborative research in which modern data science and arts-science collaboration enhances our understanding of past medical practice, and through which knowledge of the past will be made relevant in a contemporary setting.

JoGuy2

Oscar Wilde's Development as a Successful West End Dramatist

Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship

01/09/2018-31/08/2020
£110,467

Professor Josephine Guy (Centre for Regional Literature and Culture)

Oscar Wilde’s four society comedies, Lady Windermere’s Fan, A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband and The Importance of Being Earnest, are among the most performed plays in the English language. Yet key questions about their genesis, staging and politics remain unresolved; and with the exception of Earnest, little is known either about their original performance texts which in each case were different from the published texts by which they are encountered today.

Of these questions, the most important centre on how Wilde developed the hybrid formula – known as the ‘society comedy’ – which led to this string of West End hits, given that his previous dramatic experiments – Vera; or, the Nihilists, The Duchess of Padua, A Wife’s Tragedy and Salomé – were in different genres and much less successful.

Related questions concern Wilde’s working relationships with other theatrical professionals, and the extent to which these were collaborative or coercive; as well as how Wilde learned to handle political material on the stage.

My project aims to bring a wealth of new evidence to bear on these questions, providing new insights into how Wilde developed his craft as a playwright.

I will focus on a re-examination of Wilde’s first West End hit, Lady Windermere’s Fan, and its relationship with Vera – Wilde’s only previous play (with the partial exception of Lawrence Barrett’s 1891 production of a heavily reworked Duchess of Padua) to have received a commercial staging. No substantial new textual scholarship has been undertaken into either Lady Windermere’s Fan or Vera since the 1980s. My project will be the first attempt since then to undertake a systematic re-examination of the extensive archival evidence relating to the composition and staging of both plays.

KathyConklin2

Linguistic Patterns in First and Second Language Acquisition: does input matter?

Leverhulme Trust

01/09/2018-30/06/2019
£37,460

Dr Kathy Conklin ( Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics)

A major focus of my research is on formulaic language. For example, English speakers say that things go together like “bread and butter” not like “butter and bread”. While linguistic patterns such as these account for up to half of spoken discourse, they are a relatively under-researched phenomenon. I investigate how input in a second language relates to adults’ acquisition and processing of formulaic sequences. Research at the Language Development Department (LaDD) at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics focuses on how children’s learning mechanisms exploit language input to develop linguistic knowledge. I have been awarded a ten month Leverhulme International Fellowship to work to bring insights from first and second language acquisition together, which will enable new and broader explanations of input driven language development, while also demonstrating the value of addressing fundamental questions about acquisition by bringing together experts who normally work apart – those on child and adult language development. 

Louise Mullany 150x120

The Language, Gender and Leadership Network

AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council)

1/10/2017-1/04/2019
£26,160

Professor Louise Mullany ( Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics) ( Linguistic Profiling for Professionals

The Language, Gender and Leadership Network will enhance economic development and the welfare of women in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) by analysing the key communicative challenges facing women and girls for them to become a successful generation of leaders in businesses and politics in Africa and beyond. The Network's creation will provide an innovative opportunity for academics, policy makers, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), charities and other stakeholders to focus on the core communicative skills required to succeed as leaders in businesses and politics in LMICs, through a focus on the sociolinguistics of narrative.

Laura Murphy india 120x150

21st Century Slave Revolts and Underground Railroads

The British Academy

15/08/2019-15/01/2019
£32,975

I am collaborating with University of Nottingham’s transdisciplinary Rights Lab on Modern Slavery and the School of English, as I prepare a public-facing manuscript on 21st century “underground railroads” and contribute to the development of an archive of modern slave narratives. The monograph will analyze the strategies of grassroots resistance to modern slavery and the conceptions of freedom that emerge from that resistance. My collaboration with the world’s leading research institute on modern slavery has four main goals:

1) begin writing a manuscript on slave resistance, informed by the expertise of leading scholars in the field of modern slavery studies,

2) exchange and employ research methods for big data digital analysis of slave narratives,

3) collect narratives and build relationships with international partners for the book and the Voices for Freedom dataset

4) collaborate to develop a “Voices for Freedom” public online archive

IMG_3944 150x120

Research Society for Victorian Periodicals

Curran Fellowship

01/09/2018-31/12/2018
£2,597

Dr Máire Ní Fhlathúin (Centre for Regional Literature and Culture)

This project aims to illuminate an under-explored area of research: the poetry published in the periodical press of British India during the nineteenth century. What kinds of poetry did readers of Indian newspapers and periodicals encounter? How did the humorous, interrogative, antagonistic nature of this work contribute to the evolution of an India-wide colonial public sphere? My research will explore these issues in a substantial body of original poetry published in small-circulation newspapers across India. Most of these lost poems remain unpublished since their first appearance, and some survive only as fragile paper texts in Indian archives. As a largely untapped research resource, they cast significant new light on literary and political relationships between the metropolis and the provinces of British India. Among their main characteristics are a concern with political and social commentary, and a hybrid form in which works are composed in relation to both indigenous and British metropolitan literary traditions.

joannarobinson

Integrated Immersive Inclusiveness: trialling immersive technologies

AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council)

01/02/2018-31/12/2019
£31,742

Dr Joanna Robinson (Centre for Regional Literature and Culture)

This project is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). It brings together Red Earth Theatre, a small-scale touring theatre company with an established track record and commitment to research in inclusive integrated communication for young audiences (with a focus on deaf audiences) and an interdisciplinary team of researchers across arts and computer sciences at the University of Nottingham to explore solutions for those audiences for whom, up until now, immersion in performance has been hindered by modes of accessibility that divide and distract attention.

Red Earth’s ‘total communication’ approach to making theatre aims to integrate modes of communication – including metaphor, symbol, costume, set, lighting, auditory, signed, oral, written – immersively within the theatrical aesthetics of the performance, but the work required to achieve this is expensive and demanding for small- and medium-scale theatre companies. Working together through a series of workshops and events with key stakeholders from the deaf community, locally and nationally, this project explores the development and use of cheap or freely available immersive technologies to support further development of integrated inclusiveness for deaf audiences in small scale touring productions.

Norbert 150x120

Developing an Empirically-based Rank List of Vocabulary Knowledge

British Council (Manchester)

01/10/2016 - 30/09/2018
£26,160

Professor Norbert Schmitt ( Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics)

Problem: It is widely acknowledged that vocabulary is a key component of language proficiency, and frequency has been used to decide the most important words to teach. But frequency is a rather crude measure of a word's value, and often does not map onto the ways L2 learners acquire their vocabulary.  Examples are the words pencil and eraser.  These are absolutely critical for the classroom, and all students learn these words early on. But in terms of frequency, they occur all the way down at the 4,000th and 5,000th frequency levels. 

Solution: The solution is to develop a rank list of English vocabulary which is not based frequency data, but on the actual likelihood of L2 learners knowing the words. Of course, all learners are different, and will learn some words before others. Nevertheless, there is very good reason to believe that some form of hierarchy does exist, and even if only probabilistic, it will almost certainly provide a better basis for informing vocabulary pedagogy than the current frequency lists. The goal of the LORKOV project is to develop such a list, by testing large numbers of L2 learners to see how well they know a range of words. 

Bearded Henry James by Granger 120x150

The Cambridge Edition of the Complete Fiction of Henry James: Volume 28: 'The Lesson of the Master' and Other Tales

British Academy / Leverhulme Small Travel Grant

01/07/2017 - 01/09/2018
£3,000

Dr Rebekah Scott ( Centre for Regional Literature and Culture)

During the late nineteenth century the novelist Henry James was a prolific writer of short stories, many of which were first published in periodicals before undergoing extensive revision for book publication. Today, most of these 120 or so tales are available only in early (often corrupted) magazine edition, with minimal commentary. Commissioned by Cambridge University Press as part of its monumental and ongoing Complete Fiction of Henry James, I am aiming to produce a scholarly edition of a group of tales, written between 1888 and 1892, which reproduce the first revised, book edition, alongside annotations, a table of variants spanning revisions over a twenty-year period, and a 20,000 word scholarly introduction that places each tale in the Anglo-American publishing culture (magazine and book) of this period, rather than in broad biographical or thematic contexts, which is how "selected editions" have operated in the past. Archival material (unpublished letters between James and his editors; manuscripts; book contracts and copyright agreements) found in the Houghton Library (Harvard), the Beinecke (Yale), the Firestone (Princeton), the Butler (Columbia), the Berg Collection (New York Public Library), the Pierpont Morgan, the University of Reading (Special Collections), and the British Library, is central to my account of the composition, publication, revision and reception histories of these tales, which include such characteristic and classic titles as 'The Lesson of the Master', 'The Pupil' and 'Brooksmith'. 

joannarobinson

Citizen Scholarship in Nottingham: understanding the value of engaging users with heritage and culture

AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council)

01/09/2017 - 31/08/2018
£60,668

Dr Joanna Robinson ( Centre for Regional Literature and Culture)

This follow on AHRC funding project, developed in collaboration with the Theatre Royal and  Nottingham UNESCO City of Literature, represents an important opportunity to work with partners across the city of Nottingham to establish frameworks both for enabling participation in cultural and heritage activities at a local level and for understanding the value of such participation in terms of the experience of the organisation and the individual.

AbigailWard2

In dialogue with the past: Legacies of the transatlantic slave trade in Canada’s modern-day slavery

Leverhulme International Academic Fellowship

01/09/2017 - 30/06/2018
£39,700

Dr Abigail Ward ( Centre for Regional Literature and Culture)

My Leverhulme International Academic Fellowship enables me to develop an innovative multidisciplinary approach and network concerning the relationship between 21st-century forms of enslavement and the transatlantic slave trade within Canada. The purpose of my Fellowship at the University of Calgary is twofold; firstly, to create an interdisciplinary framework for my project (and future teaching and research) within Canada, where I will be able to meet with, and learn from, key figures (both academics and those within organisations devoted to ending human trafficking). Secondly, I will cultivate these contacts into a dynamic network, with a view to facilitating future collaborations between universities, academics, and anti-slavery charities.

ResearchProj-BringingVikings 150x120

Bringing Vikings Back to the East Midlands

AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council)

01/02/2017 - 31/03/2018
£145,811

Professor Judith Jesch (Centre for the Study of the Viking Age)

This follow-on AHRC funding project has been developed in collaboration with the University Museum and Lakeside Arts to support the British Museum/York Museums Trust exhibition Viking: Rediscover the Legend, examining how the Viking diaspora in the East Midlands shaped the development of the area. The project aims to encourage creative engagement with the East Midlands’ Viking heritage through a programme of knowledge exchange workshops, public lectures, seminars and activities, an East Midlands-themed exhibition about Vikings and their legacy, and a website featuring information about the Vikings in the East Midlands.

Read more about the project.
jamesmoran

The Sherwood Foresters of the Easter Rising: Memories, Monuments, and Fictions

AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council) (Centre for Hidden Histories)

01/01/2017 - 07/10/2017
£15,980

Professor Jim Moran

This collaborative research project seeks to uncover the voices of the Sherwood Foresters who fought during the Easter Rising of 1916.  This group of men has been consistently under-represented in narratives of the First World War and of Anglo-Irish history. This project seeks to uncover the lives and words of the Sherwood Foresters, and to have those hidden lives represented in public performance. 

It has been the primary aim of this project to recover the unfamiliar archival material associated with the Sherwood Foresters of 1916 in order to recount their experience of the Easter Rising, and to recover the fascinating and largely unknown story of what happened to the Sherwood Foresters both in Dublin and afterwards on the Western Front. The project also aims to show how, in visual monuments and in fictional depictions, those Sherwood Foresters have subsequently been remembered, and misremembered, in British and Irish culture.

The project has had both an academic and a popular output. The first is a scholarly journal publication that has been co-written by James Moran and Fintan Cullen, which has been accepted for publication in Irish Studies Review and is entitled ‘The Sherwood Foresters of 1916: Memories and Memorials’. The latter is a public performance, given at the Lakeside Theatre on 7 October 2017, the details of which can be found here.

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The Collected Letters of Robert Southey. Part 7: 1821-27

MHRA (Modern Humanities Research Association)

01/10/2016 - 01/09/2017
£23,000

Professor Lynda Pratt ( Centre for Regional Literature and Culture)

This Modern Humanities Research Association award funded a Research Associate, Dr Sara Slinn, to work with Professor Lynda Pratt on editing Part 7 of the first-ever scholarly edition of The Collected Letters of Robert Southey. Robert Southey (1774-1843) was a multi-disciplinary, multi-lingual, one-man literary industry. His vast correspondence is key to understanding his life, work and relationship to his times, but is now dispersed between over 200 archives spread across the globe. Identifying, collecting, transcribing, editing and annotating his letters therefore presents some formidable challenges, which Lynda and the rest of the team are tackling head on. 

The Collected Letters is based in the School of English, Nottingham, and draws on the expertise of a team of interdisciplinary and international researchers. The edition is being published online and free of access by Romantic Circles, the leading international experts in digital Romanticism. When complete, it will make available texts of Southey’s 7500 surviving letters edited to the highest scholarly standards. Part 7 will be published in 2018. Please do follow the link to see Parts 1-6 of the Collected Letters, published in 2009-16:  www.rc.umd.edu/editions/southey_letters

 

Flood and Flow: Place-Names and River System Hydrography Past, Present, Future

Leverhulme Trust
01/08/2016 - 31/07/2018
£44,330
Dr Jayne Carroll

Travel and communication in Anglo-Saxon England

Leverhulme Trust
01/11/2014 - 31/10/2017
£122,593
Dr Jayne Carroll

L2 reading and reading-while-listening in multi-modal learning conditions: An eye-tracking study

British Council (Manchester)
01/10/2015 - 30/09/2017
£9,748
Dr Kathryn Conklin

Past projects

Philip Leverhulme Prize - Performing and Visual Arts

Leverhulme Trust
01/11/2014 - 31/10/2016
£70,000
Professor James Moran

Sarah Atkins FRL - Simulated assessments of General Practitioners' consultations in a multicultural society: a linguistic analysis

ESRC
21/10/2013 - 20/04/2016
£116,749
Professor Julie Sanders

British Academy Fellowship - The Drama of DH Lawrence: Regional Identity and Space

British Academy
16.12.13 to 15.12.14
£83,600
Dr Jim Moran

CLiC Dickens - Characterisation in the Representation of Speech and Body Language from a Corpus Stylistic Perspective

AHRC
01.10.13 - 30.09.15
£200,437
Professor Michaela Mahlberg
Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics

Provincial Shakespeare Performance

AHRC
01.10.13 - 30.09.16
£55,128
Dr Jo Robinson

Leverhulme Research Fellowship

Leverhulme
01.09.13 to 31.08.15
£34,901
Dr Nicola Royan 

The Place-Names of Shropshire

AHRC
01/01/13 - 31/12/16
£714,720
Dr Jayne Carroll
Institute for Name-Studies

Fellowship - The Viking Diaspora

AHRC
27/01/13 - 26/09/13
£61,175
Professor Judith Jesch
Centre for the Study of the Viking Age

Maitland Quarto Manuscript

AHRC early career fellowship (2012)
22/01/12 - 21/10/12
Dr Joanna Martin 

Digital Exposure of English Place-names (DEEP)

JISC
01/11/11 to 31/07/13
£181,307
Dr Jayne Carroll
(in collaboration with the Centre for e-Research - King's College London, EDINA and Language Technology Group (LTG) - University of Edinburgh, Centre for Data Digitization and Analysis (CDDA) - Queen's University Belfast
Institute for Name-Studies

A Newly Discovered Account of Ben Jonson's Walk to Scotland: an Annotated Edition, Contextual Essays and Resources for Heritage Interpretation

AHRC
01/05/11 to 31/10/13
£45,774
Professor Julie Sanders
(in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh)
Centre for Regional Literature and Cultures
Landscape, Place, Space Research Group

The Impact of Diaspora in the Making of Britain: evidence, memory and invention

Leverhulme
01/01/11 to 31/12/15
£78,584
Dr Jayne Carroll
(in collaboration with the University of Leicester)
Institute for Name-Studies

Landscapes of Governance: Assembly Sites in England, 5th-11th Centuries

Leverhulme
19/10/09 to 18/10/12
£119,021
Dr Jayne Carroll
(in collaboration with University College London)
Institute for Name-Studies

Exploiting Corpus Research for English Language Teaching

ESRC
01/01/2011 to 31/12/11
£86,801
Professor Ronald Carter and Professor Svenja Adolphs
Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics

From Corpus to Classroom - EPSRC Knowledge Transfer Secondment to Industry Partner

EPSRC
01/07/2010 to 31/10/11
£38,736
Professor Ronald Carter and Professor Svenja Adolphs
Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics

Health Communication and the Internet: An Analysis of Adolescent Language Use on the Teenage Health Freak Website

ESRC
£75,839
01/07/09 to 30/06/10
Professor Svenja Adolphs and Dr Louise Mullany
Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics

The Wollaton Medieval Manuscripts: texts, owners and readers

AHRC
01/11/08 to 31/07/10
£243,162
Professor Thorlac Turville-Petre

Genes of Gallgoidil: Migration of Irish, Hiberno-Norse and other Gaelic-speaking populations in the Viking Age

AHRC
01/11/08 to 31/10/10
£15,731
Dr Christina Lee
(in collaboration with the University of Limerick)
Centre for the Study of the Viking Age

Major Research Fellowship

Leverhulme
01/09/08 to 31/08/10
£79,398
Professor Janette Dillon

Letters of Robert Southey (Part 1-4: 1791 to 1815)

AHRC
01/04/07 to 31/03/10
£363,394
Professor Lynda Pratt
Centre for Regional Literature and Culture

English place-name study and regional variety

AHRC
01/09/05 to 31/08/10
£330,518
Dr David Parsons
Institute for Name-Studies

Mapping Nottingham Performance Culture

AHRC
01/06/06 to 31/07/09
£289,045
(in collaboration with the School of Geography)
( Video available for 'Mapping the Moment')
Dr Joanna Robinson
Centre for Regional Literature and Culture

Leverhulme Visiting Professorship

This professorship is attached to the Humanities and Social Sciences Research Centre-funded interdisciplinary
Landscape, Space, Place research group 
Conferences and symposia organised by the project have attracted additional funding and support from the AHRC's Landscape and Environment programme and the Landscape, Space, Place Research Group
2005 to 2008
(in collaboration with the School of Geography)
Professor Julie Sanders
Centre for Regional Literature and Culture

New form of digital record for e-Social Science 3

ESRC
01/04/05 to 31/03/08
£95,157
(in collaboration with other schools)
Professor Ronald Carter
Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics

Second language speech fluency

EPSRC
01/09/05 to 31/08/08
£71,037
(in collaboration with other schools)
Dr Svenja Adolphs
Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics

Anglo Saxon Civil Defence in the Viking Age

Leverhulme Trust
1/10/05 to 30/09/08
£90,119
Dr David Parsons
Institute for Name-Studies 

Viking Identities Network

AHRC
01/04/06 to 31/03/09
£19,905
Professor Judith Jesch
Centre for the Study of the Viking Age

Gender Processing in monolinguals and bilinguals

British Academy
01/05/06 to 30/04/08
£72,036
(in collaboration with the School of Psychology)
Dr Kathy Conklin
Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics

Electronic edition of Piers Plowman

AHRC
01/09/06 to 31/08/08
£95,987
Professor Thorlac Turville-Petre

 

Related Research Body Links

Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Leverhulme Trust British Academy Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)

School of English

Trent Building
The University of Nottingham
University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 5900
fax: +44 (0) 115 951 5924
email: english-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk