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Martin Mahony

British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow and Nottingham Research Fellow, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

Martin's background is in human geography and science & technology studies (STS). He completed his first degree in Geography at the University of Oxford in 2008, before taking a Masters degree in Environmental Social Science and a PhD in Human Geography at the University of East Anglia. He has since spent time as a researcher in the Department of Geography, King's College London, and has held visiting fellowships at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the Institute for Advanced Studies in Media Cultures of Computer Simulation (MECS) at Leuphana University, Germany.

Expertise Summary

Science and technology studies, historical geography, history of science, climate change, climate politics

Research Summary

Martin's research concerns the intersections of environment, science and society. His current interests are in the entwined histories of atmospheric science and atmospheric politics, with a… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

Martin's research concerns the intersections of environment, science and society. His current interests are in the entwined histories of atmospheric science and atmospheric politics, with a particular focus on the historical geographies of science, empire and climate in the British colonial world.

Martin is currently a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow and Nottingham Research Fellow, working on a project entitled 'Imperial weather: meteorology and the making of twentieth century colonialism'. The project examines the history of meteorology and climatology in the contexts of British colonial expansion, administration and decolonisation, making use of tools from historical geography and science & technology studies (STS) to investigate the spatialities of atmospheric knowledges and their intersections with forms of governmental practice and power. Engaging with current historiographic debates, the research addresses the relationship between metropole and colony in the production and circulation of scientific knowledges, the role of ideas of climatic otherness, tropicality and change in the shaping of scientific practices, and the interaction of diverse 'local' knowledges in the construction of new understandings of a global atmosphere.

The project makes use of a number of archival sources in the UK and overseas, with a geographic focus on former British colonies in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia.

More information on the project can be found at www.imperialweather.com

Past Research

Martin's previous research has focused on the cultural politics of climate change and the science-policy interface, particularly on the roles of scientific simulation, visualisation and assessment in the co-production of scientific, political and cultural imaginations of climate change.

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