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Julia Clark

Assistant Professor in Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

I joined the Midwifery team in January 2021 after undertaking a funded PhD at the University of Leicester's Department of Health Sciences. The ethnographic study on which my PhD is based was a collaborative project between SAPPHIRE and TIMMS, with qualitative methods and sociological theory shaping my exploration of care following altered fetal movement, a widely recognised risk factor for stillbirth.

My academic career started with a Modern and Medieval languages BA at the University of Cambridge, with honorary MA (Cantab). After several years as a youth worker, I turned to a career in midwifery, graduating from King's College London in 2014 with a BSc in Midwifery with Registration. I have a long-standing interest in improving the care of women who are at risk of, or experience, stillbirth, with my introduction to maternity care a voluntary placement at SANDS, the Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Charity.

Alongside my PhD, I work as an antenatal teacher and member of the Sheffield Maternity Co-operative, which provides information, support and advocacy for pregnant people and their families in and around Sheffield.

Expertise Summary

Over the course of my doctoral studies, I have developed expertise in qualitative research methods, as well as deep knowledge of stillbirth prevention work, the care, monitoring and treatment of women with altered fetal movement, and the experiences and perspectives of maternity clinicians as they work to reduce risk and save babies' lives. I have a particular interest in how safety and risk-reduction work can impact on mothers' mental health and experiences of pregnancy and birth. Other research interests include induction of labour, informed choice, maternal responsibility and 'anxious reproduction', and inequalities, rights and advocacy in maternity care.

As a registered midwife, I have worked across maternity settings to develop the clinical and interpersonal skills required to practise and teach midwifery safely and effectively. I have extensive experience of facilitating antenatal learning within the NHS, as an independent antenatal educator, and - most recently - within a novel co-operative model.

School of Health Sciences

B236, Medical School
Queen's Medical Centre
Nottingham, NG7 2HA

telephone: +44 (0)115 95 15559
email: mhssupport@nottingham.ac.uk