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Angeliki Roumpou

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Biography

I graduated from the University of Athens with a BA in Classical and Modern Greek Philology and an MPhil in Classics, specialised in Latin language and literature. In 2014 I moved to the UK and began my doctoral thesis on the 1st century AD epic. For my PhD thesis I wrote a literary commentary on Silius Italicus' Punica 17.341-654. I have been working as a Teaching Affiliate in the University of Nottingham since 2015, teaching modules on Roman Epic and Roman drama, as well as on Ancient Greek and Latin language (grammar, syntax, translation process).

Teaching Summary

I have been working as a Teaching Affiliate since 2015 for a number of undergraduate modules on Latin language at different levels, including "Intermediate Latin (grammar/syntax)", "Advanced Latin… read more

Research Summary

For my research, I am writing a literary commentary on Silius Italicus' Punica 17. This commentary, the first detailed commentary on book 17 in any language explores the way Silius places himself… read more

I have been working as a Teaching Affiliate since 2015 for a number of undergraduate modules on Latin language at different levels, including "Intermediate Latin (grammar/syntax)", "Advanced Latin (grammar/syntax)", "Roman Epic" and "Roman Elegy".

Current Research

For my research, I am writing a literary commentary on Silius Italicus' Punica 17. This commentary, the first detailed commentary on book 17 in any language explores the way Silius places himself within the extensive and established epic tradition and the closural methods he uses as he brings his epic to an end. It includes a comprehensive introduction to the poem's literary and historical context, along with the Latin text, English translation, and a line-by-line commentary that illuminates historiographical, textual, linguistic and literary issues arising from the narrative.

Regarding the commentary, I decided to focus on Silius' relationship with his preceding Latin epic authors, mainly Virgil and Ovid, and also his contemporaries, Statius and Valerius with whom he shares the same cultural, political and literary background. Special emphasis is given to Lucan whose epic continuously discourses with Silius' one. Silius' intertextuality with Latin epic will shed light and promote an interpretation of a better understanding of Domitianic Rome and Flavian epic in general.

Department of Classics and Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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