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Christopher Booth

PhD Candidate (M3C Funded), Faculty of Arts

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Biography

My archaeological background includes my BA and MA at the University of Sheffield, where I focused on the material culture of distillation and monastic chemistry, as well as a stint working in commercial archaeology with Albion Archaeology in Bedford. Consequently I have extensive experience of excavation, research, and museum work related to archaeology. I am interested in the archaeology of medieval and post-medieval science, technology, and medicine; colonial archaeology in the Atlantic region; and the presentation of archaeology to the public by researchers, commercial units, community groups, and museums.

Research Summary

My project presents a new approach to the archaeology of medicine and pharmacy in the early modern period and will make a significant contribution to medical humanities scholarship by producing a… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

My project presents a new approach to the archaeology of medicine and pharmacy in the early modern period and will make a significant contribution to medical humanities scholarship by producing a synthesis of the archaeological and historical evidence to provide new insights into the medical practice, social role, and cultural importance of apothecaries in the British Colonial Atlantic region from c.1500 until 1815. Although so far under-studied, my project aims to assess the archaeological and material culture evidence for apothecaries in Britain, Ireland, and the British Colonial Atlantic. Analysing the material culture evidence alongside documentary sources related to both specific sites and the profession of the apothecary in general, my thesis will explore how the work and status of apothecaries was affected by being at the centre of new global networks of exchange, as well as being intimately involved in the rapid commercialisation of health-care in the later seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. I will also use these data to examine how apothecaries used material culture to engender trust in their patients as medicine became more and more removed from home-produced traditional herbal remedies.

Past Research

I have previously researched the development of the material culture used for distillation from the early medieval period to the early modern, as well as the material culture of alchemy and chymistry in medieval British monasteries.

Department of Classics and Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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