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David Appleby

Lecturer in Early Modern British History, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

Dr David Appleby graduated with a BA (Hons) in the History of Art and Design from Leicester Polytechnic (now De Montfort University) in 1981. Following a career in industry (during which time he wrote the first full-length biography of the royalist general Sir Charles Lucas), he resumed his academic studies as a mature student. He gained an MA with distinction in Comparative History at the University of Essex in 1997, with a dissertation supervised by Professor John Walter. After further years in industry, working as a graphic artist, David secured a position as a Graduate Teaching Assistant at the University of Keele. David's PhD thesis, 'The farewell sermons of ministers ejected from the Church of England in 1662' (supervised by Professor Ann Hughes and Dr Roger Pooley) was accepted in 2005. David moved to the University of Nottingham in 2006. In 2008 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. His first major monograph, Black Bartholomew's Day: Preaching, Polemic and Restoration Nonconformity (Manchester, 2007), was awarded the Richard L. Greaves Prize by the International John Bunyan Society in 2010. He received a Lord Dearing Award in July 2011, for contributions to the development of teaching and student learning at Nottingham. David is a historical adviser to the National Civil War Centre in Newark, and has served on the steering committee of the East Midlands Early Modern Colloquium. He is a co-investigator in an AHRC Standard Grant project entitled 'Welfare, Conflict and Memory during and after the English Civil Wars 1642-1700', due to commence in June 2017 (see http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/newsroom/2017/02/10/human-cost-war/). He has recently co-edited Battle-Scarred: Mortality, Medical Care and Military Welfare in the British Civil Wars, with Professor Andrew Hopper, and is writing a general history entitled A Short History of the English Revolution. A longer-term project is an academic monograph on the disbanded Cromwellian army in Restoration Britain. Apart from history and painting, a particular passion remains his hometown football club, Colchester United. David contributed to My Layer Road, a compendium of fans' memories of the U's former football ground, in 2009.

Office hours for 2018-2019: Tuesdays 11-12, Thursdays 4-5

Expertise Summary

I am able to supervise student research in several areas of early modern British history, such as:

  • The British Civil Wars 1639-1652

  • The Commonwealth and Protectorate 1649-1660

  • The Restoration 1660-1685

  • Crime and punishment in early modern England 1500-1750

  • Early modern preaching

  • Early modern Essex and its hinterlands

  • Early modern Staffordshire and its hinterlands

I am currently on the supervisory team of three Midlands3Cities PhD theses.

Teaching Summary

First-year UG modules taught: V11108 Learning History (seminar tutor, lecturer); V11213 Reformation to Revolution (lecturer).

Second-year UG modules taught: V12211 Communities, Crime and Punishment in England 1500-1800 (module convenor, lecturer, seminar tutor); V12GEN Doing History.

Third-year UG modules taught: V13136 British Civil Wars, Special Subject (module convenor, seminar tutor); V13241 Dissertation (dissertation supervisor)

Postgraduate modules taught to date: V144474 Exploring English Identity (seminar tutor), V14551 War and Society: Concepts and Comparisons (seminar tutor) and V1D532 Theory and Evidence, core module (seminar tutor).

Research Summary

My main interests lie in social, cultural, religious and military aspects of later seventeenth-century Britain. My interest in the British Civil Wars - particularly in the experiences of war widows… read more

Recent Publications

  • APPLEBY, DAVID J., 2018. Sermons and Preaching. In: JOHN COFFEY, ed., The Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions: Volume 1: Beginnings to the Toleration Act 1. Oxford University Press. (In Press.)
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J., 2018. The third army: wandering soldiers and the negotiation of Parliamentary authority 1642-1651. In: DAVID J. APPLEBY and ANDREW HOPPER, eds., Battle-Scarred: Mortality, Medical Care and Military Welfare in the British Civil Wars Manchester University Press.
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J. and HOPPER, ANDREW J., eds., 2018. Battle-Scarred: Mortality, Medical Care and Military Welfare in the British Civil Wars Manchester University Press.
  • APPLEBY, D.J., 2013. Veteran politics in Restoration England 1660-1670 Seventeenth Century. 28(3), 323-342

Current Research

My main interests lie in social, cultural, religious and military aspects of later seventeenth-century Britain. My interest in the British Civil Wars - particularly in the experiences of war widows and maimed soldiers - has been reflected in various publications over the years. Most recently I have become interested in the continuing importance of religion (especially that of the Presbyterian variety) in political affairs after the Restoration. This research has resulted in a number of conference papers in Britain and the USA, several articles, and an academic monograph, Black Bartholomew's Day, which explores the issues surrounding the mass ejection of Puritan ministers from the Church of England in 1662.

Black Bartholomew's Day

I have completed a British Academy-funded research project to analyse the reintegration of military veterans into civilian communities after the British Civil Wars (and in particular the disbandment of Cromwell's army after the Restoration of 1660). The first output has been an article 'Veteran politics in Restoration England 1660-1670', which is available on Open Access: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0268117X.2013.823101

Black Bartholomew's Day received the Richard L. Greaves Award in 2010 (an award presented triennially by the International John Bunyan Society in memory of R. L. Greaves, an outstanding scholar of nonconformity who was President of the IJBS 1992-95).

Supervision

I am able to supervise student projects in several areas of early modern British history, including:

  • The British Civil Wars 1639-1652
  • The Commonwealth and Protectorate 1649-1660
  • The Restoration
  • Crime and punishment in early modern England
  • Early modern preaching
  • Early modern Essex and its hinterlands
  • Early modern Staffordshire and its hinterlands

I am currently involved in the supervision of three Midlands3Cities PhDs and one Nottingham PhD:

* 'Social Networking in the Hudson's Bay Company 1670-1870' (UoN)

* 'The experience of war widows and orphans in the Midlands during the mid-seventeenth century' (M3C)

* 'Refugees from Ireland during the 1640s' (M3C)

* "Shiten sheperde and a clene sheep"? Clergy-lay relationships in seventeenth-century Herefordshire (M3C)

Conferences

Conference papers:

'The long and winding road: the problem of the wandering soldier in seventeenth-century England', Mortality, Care and Military Welfare during the British Civil Wars international conference, National Civil War Centre, Newark, August 2015.

'"All things to all men": interpreting the Farewell Sermons of 1662', 1662 Revisited Conference, Dr Williams's Centre for Dissenting Studies/Queen Mary, London, May 2012.

'Preaching at the Restoration: the political application of scripture', King James Bible Anniversary Conference, University of York, July 2011.

'The Restoration county community: a post-conflict culture', Centre for Local Studies, University of Leicester, February 2011.

'King David and the Restoration 1660-1685', Centre for Research in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Colloquium, University of Reading, November 2010.

'The experience of despair: Restoration politics and the court martial of Colonel Guy Molesworth, 1663', University of Keele, October 2008.

"Heaven is inherited by the violent": the presentation of the military in early modern sermons', Centre for Research in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Colloquium, University of Reading, November, 2007.

'Who forgot the New Model Army? A missing postscript of the Civil War', Popularity, Creativity and History: The Legacy of the English Revolution, University of Liverpool, April 2007

'Issues of audience and reception in Restoration preaching', Readers, Audiences and Coteries in Early Modern England Conference, University of Keele, April 2005

'The "trial of obedience" and the "trial of faith": perceptions of political and religious loyalty in Restoration England, Bangor Conference on the Restoration, University of Wales, Bangor, July 2005

'"Those very screws and engines": anti-popish rhetoric in the feud between John Berkenhead and Roger L'Estrange', The British Society for Eighteenth Century Studies Annual Conference, St Hugh's College, University of Oxford, January 2005

'The image of king and kingship in Restoration sermons', North American Conference on British Studies, Oregon, USA, October 2003

'Membership of the public sphere in Restoration England', Religion and the Early Modern Public Sphere, University of Keele, June 2003

'For God or Caesar?: the dilemmas of Restoration nonconformists', Conscience and the Early Modern World 1500-1800, University of Sheffield, July 2002

'Sir Charles Lucas and the siege of Colchester', Our Fall Our Fame: Royalism in East Anglia, Anglia Ruskin University, October 1998

Public lectures:

'The Restoration of the monarchy and the Great Ejection of 1662', Lent Lecture, Lichfield Cathedral, March 2012.

'Killing the New Model Army: the demilitarisation of Restoration Britain', Historical Association, Bedford Branch April 2011.

"The impact of the mid-seventeenth-century wars on Staffordshire", Staffordshire Historians' Guild, University of Keele, April, 2005

'Combination and control: cultural management of nineteenth-century friendly societies', Jack Leighton Memorial Lecture, University of Keele, November, 2002

'The artist at the Stuart court', National Maritime Museum, London, August 2000

Future Research

I am a co-Investigator in a four-year AHRC project, which commenced in June 2017: 'Welfare, Conflict and Memory during and after the English Civil Wars 1642-1700', together with Dr Andrew Hopper (Leicester, PI), Professor Mark Stoyle (Southampton) and Dr Lloyd Bowen (Cardiff). For more details, see https://www.civilwarpetitions.ac.uk/.

  • APPLEBY, DAVID J., 2018. Sermons and Preaching. In: JOHN COFFEY, ed., The Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions: Volume 1: Beginnings to the Toleration Act 1. Oxford University Press. (In Press.)
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J., 2018. The third army: wandering soldiers and the negotiation of Parliamentary authority 1642-1651. In: DAVID J. APPLEBY and ANDREW HOPPER, eds., Battle-Scarred: Mortality, Medical Care and Military Welfare in the British Civil Wars Manchester University Press.
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J. and HOPPER, ANDREW J., eds., 2018. Battle-Scarred: Mortality, Medical Care and Military Welfare in the British Civil Wars Manchester University Press.
  • APPLEBY, D.J., 2013. Veteran politics in Restoration England 1660-1670 Seventeenth Century. 28(3), 323-342
  • APPLEBY, D.J., 2012. The Restoration county community: a post-conflict culture. In: EALES, J. and HOPPER, A., eds., The county community in seventeenth-century England and Wales University of Hertfordshire Press. 100-124
  • APPLEBY, D.J., 2012. From ejectment to toleration in England, 1662-1689. In: SELL, A.P.F., ed., The great ejectment of 1662: its antecedents, aftermath and ecumenical significance Pickwick Publications. 67-124
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J., 2007. Black Bartholomew's Day: preaching, polemic and Restoration nonconformity Manchester: Manchester University Press.
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J., 2006. 'Issues of audience and reception in Restoration sermons'. In: BAKER, G. and MCGRUER, A., eds., Readers, audiences and coteries in early modern England Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars' Press.
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J. and TRINGHAM, NIGEL J., 2004. 'Touching for the King's Evil: James II at Lichfield in 1687' Staffordshire Archaeological and Historical Society Transactions. 40, 123-127
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J., 2002. Combination and control: cultural politics in the management of friendly societies in nineteenth-century Essex and Suffolk Essex Archaeology and History. 33 (3rd series), 323-332
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J., 2001. Unnecessary persons?: maimed soldiers and war widows in Essex 1642-1662 Essex Archaeology and History. 32 (3rd series), 209-221
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J., GILBERT, ALLAN C. and SAMUEL, S. PAUL, 2001. Canal tunnels of England & Wales: David Appleby, Allan Gilbert, Paul Samuel Birmingham: Aylestone.
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J., 1996. Our fall our fame : the life and times of Sir Charles Lucas (1613-1648): by David Appleby Newtown : Jacobus Publications, 1996.
  • APPLEBY, DAVID J. AND APPLEBY, JOHN S, 1992. The Magic Boxes: Professional Photographers and their Studios in Northeast Essex 1845-1937 Essex Record Office, Chelmsford.

Department of History

University of Nottingham
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Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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