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Caterina Moruzzi

Postdoctoral researcher,

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Teaching Summary

Autumn 2018-2019

Department of Music

Seminar leader for the module Research Techniques (W34039)

Autumn - Spring 2017-2018

Department of Philosophy

Module convenor of the module Appearance and Reality (V71LAR)

Seminar leader for the modules Self, Mind, and Body (V71SMB) and History of Western Philosophy (V71HWP)

Autumn 2016-2017

Department of Philosophy

Seminar leader for the modules Self, Mind, and Body (V71SMB) and Introduction to Ethics (V71ITE)

Guest Lecturer for the module Reasoning and Argument (V71RPM)

Department of Music

Seminar leader for the module Dissertation or Editorial/Analytical Project (W33P40)

Spring 2016

Department of Philosophy

Seminar leader for the module Appearance & Reality (V71LAR)

Guest lecturer in the module Mind and Consciousness (V72MN)

Autumn 2015-2016​

Department of Philosophy

Seminar leader for the module Self, Mind, and Body (V71SMB)

Department of Music

Seminar leader for the modules Research Techniques (W34039) and Introduction of the Philosophy and Aesthetics of Music (W32H37/W33H37)

Guest lecturer for the module Introduction of the Philosophy and Aesthetics of Music (W32H37/W33H37)

Research Summary

In my current research I investigate the impact of revolutionary development of AI technology on ontological, aesthetic, and evaluative considerations on music. In particular, I aim to answer two… read more

Moruzzi, Caterina (forthcoming). 'An Ontological Justification for Contextual Authenticity', The British Journal of Aesthetics.

Moruzzi, Caterina. (forthcoming). 'Can a Computer Create a Musical Work?: Creativity and Autonomy of AI Software for Music Composition', in Gouveia, Steven S. (ed.), Artificial Intelligence and Information: a Multidisciplinary Perspective, Vernon Press.

Moruzzi, Caterina. (2018). 'Every Performance is a Stage: Musical Stage Theory as a Novel Account for the Ontology of Musical Works', Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 76 (3): 341-351.

Moruzzi, Caterina. (2018). 'Creative AI: Music Composition Programs as an Extension of the Composer's Mind', in Müller, Vincent C. (ed.), Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence 2017, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-96448-5_8 (SAPERE; Berlin: Springer, 2018).

Moruzzi, Caterina. 2016. 'An Alternative Account of the Ontology of Musical Works: Defending Musical Stage Theory', Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics, vol. 8.

Moruzzi, Caterina. 2016. Review of Musical Concerns: Essays in Philosophy of Music by Jerrold Levinson, ASAGE, vol. 8, n. 1.

Moruzzi, Caterina. 2015. Review of Disunified Aesthetics: Situated Textuality, Performativity, Collaboration, by Lynette Hunter, Liminalities, vol. 11, n. 2.

Current Research

In my current research I investigate the impact of revolutionary development of AI technology on ontological, aesthetic, and evaluative considerations on music. In particular, I aim to answer two research questions: 'How does the development of computer-generated music affect the ontology of musical works?' and 'Do we deem computer-generated music as creative as human-generated music? If not, why?'. The scope of this research is to fill the existing gap in the literature in regard to the impact that cutting-edge developments in AI have on aesthetic and ontological debates on music and art. Given its interdisciplinary approach, it will build a bridge between research on computer-generated music, aesthetics, and behavioural analysis of attitudes of reception. This will be decisive to shed light on the controversial issue of creativity and, consequently, on pressing questions over matters of intellectual property and AI. It will also contribute to explain the role that intuitions play in our relation with artefacts produced by AI systems.

Past Research

In my PhD project I defend and develop a new account for the ontology of musical works: Musical Stage Theory, the view hat a musical work is a performance. I propose this account as an alternative to mainstream and well accepted views on the nature of musical works with a specific intent, that of suggesting a way to analyse the identity of musical works which gives due relevance to musical practices and, at the same time, is grounded on a solid ontological basis. As a corollary to the main ontological thesis, Musical Stage Theory also allows for contextually dependent senses of authenticity of musical performances.

Department of Music

The University of Nottingham
Lakeside Arts Centre
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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