China Policy Institute
   
   
  

Non-Resident Fellows

Daria Berg

Daria Berg

Daria Berg is the Chair Professor of Chinese Culture and Society at the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of St.Gallen, Switzerland. She studied Sinology with English Literature at Munich, Shanghai, Taipei, Oxford, Tokyo and Kyoto and received her doctorate in Chinese Studies from Oxford University in 1995.

Daria Berg has published extensively on contemporary, early modern, traditional, and classical Chinese literature, popular culture, and cultural history. Recent and current projects include Chinese media and cultural studies, literature, art, print culture, Internet literature, popular culture and cyber-culture in contemporary China, and also Ming/Qing vernacular fiction, utopianism, women poets, perceptions of gentility and the cult of emotions in late imperial China. Her most recent book-length project examines women writers and the literary world in early modern China.

Daria Berg has acted as the principal investigator of major research grants and participated in the establishment of the Confucius Institute at The University of Nottingham in partnership with Fudan University, Shanghai. She has designed, developed and taught courses on contemporary, traditional and classical Chinese literature, and contemporary Chinese cultural studies in undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes. She welcomes applications for PhD supervision in Chinese literature, cultural studies and Internet culture.

 

Anne-Marie Brady

Anne-Marie Brady

Dr Anne-Marie Brady is Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, and a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Centre in Washington DC. In 2014 she was appointed to a two-year term on the World Economic Forum’s Global Action Council on the Arctic. A highly regarded specialist on Chinese politics as well as polar politics, she is editor-in-chief of The Polar Journal, and has written four monographs, six edited books, and more than forty scholarly papers on a range of issues including China's Arctic and Antarctic interests, China's modernised propaganda system, New Zealand-China relations, NZ foreign policy and competing foreign policy interests in Antarctica. Her most recent book is China as a Polar Great Power (New York: Cambridge University Press and Wilson Press, 2016).

 

Kerry Brown

Kerry Brown

Kerry Brown is Head of the Asia Programme at Chatham House in London, where he leads the Europe China Research and Advice Network (www.euecran.eu). He was educated at Cambridge, London and Leeds, and worked for the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office from 1998 to 2005, in London and Beijing. He is an associate scholar of the Mongolian and Inner Asian Studies Unit, Cambridge University, and an associate of the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy at SOAS, and author of six books on China.

 

Jean-Pierre Cabestan

Jean-Pierre Cabestan

Jean-Pierre Cabestan is a Professor of Political Science and the Head of the Department of Government and International Studies at Hong Kong Baptist University where he teaches about Government and Politics of China and Japan. He received his Masters at Jussieu University in 1979 and his PhD from Sorbonne University in 1982. He is an Associate Research fellow at the French Centre for Research on Contemporary China which he was previously the director of from 2003 to 2007.

Jean Pierre is a prolific writer and has written numerous books on Chinese foreign and security policy including "China's foreign and security policies: between integration and will to power" (2015) and "China and the Global Financial Crisis: A Comparison with Europe" (2012). He has also written peer reviewed articles on relations across the Taiwan Strait for the International Institute for Security Studies (IISS) with his most recent being "Relations Across the Taiwan Strait: Still a Major Political and Security Problem" (2016).

 

Yongshun Cai

Yongshun Cai

Yongshun Cai is a Professor of Social Sciences at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology where he teaches on courses on Government, Law and Society in China. His primary areas of research are on social movements, collective action within China and Chinese domestic politics more broadly. He received his PhD from Stanford University in 2001 and in 2006 his paper "Disaggregating the State: Networks and Collective Action in Shanghai" won the Gordon White Prize for the most original article published in China Quarterly. In 2010, Cai published the book Collective Resistance in China Why Popular Protests Succeed or Fail which is available from Stanford University Press.

 

Allen Carlson

Allen Carlson

Allen Carlson is the Michael J. Zak Chair of History for U.S.-China Relations and an Associate Professor in Cornell University's Department of Government. He was granted his PhD from Yale University's Political Science Department. His undergraduate degree is from Colby College. In 2005, his book Unifying China, Integrating with the World: Securing Chinese Sovereignty in the Reform Era was published by Stanford University Press. He has also written articles that appeared in the Journal of Contemporary China, Pacific Affairs, Asia Policy, Nations and Nationalism, and The China Quarterly.

Carlson is currently working on a project that examines transnational patterns within contemporary Chinese politics. In addition, he is engaged in research on new developments within Sino-Tibetan relations. Professor Carlson is also the director of the China and Asia Pacific Studies (CAPS) program at Cornell.

 

Adam Cathcart

Adam Cathcart

Dr Adam Cathcart is Lecturer in Chinese history at the University of Leeds, where his research focuses on Sino-North Korean relations and frontiers, the construction of anti-Japanese nationalism in China in the late 1940s, and cultural interactions in Northeast Asia during the Cold War. He is the founder and editor of SinoNK.com, a website which investigates Chinese-Korean relations and histories. He is currently cooperating with Shanghai Jiaotong University research students on the early history of CCP consolidation of Sichuan, and reading the Mao Zedong Nianpu while trying to understand how the "Three Anti" Movement impacted Chinese participants in the Korean War.

 

Simon Chadwick

Professor Simon Chadwick

Simon is professor of Sports Enterprise at Salford University Manchester, where he is also Director of the University's Industry Collaboration Zone in Sport. His interests lay in the commercial development and management of sport, in particular in the areas of business strategy and marketing in sport. More specifically, Chadwick is currently engaged in research focused on brands, sponsors, fans and social media.

A significant part of his work is undertaken in an Asian context, with a strong but not exclusive focus on China. Most notably, he has researched and written extensively on China and Chinese football, including on fan (consumer) behaviour, perceptions of sponsorship among Chinese people, and the activities of online brand communities in football. In addition, Chadwick writes, comments and consults extensively on the significant changes taking place in Chinese football.

Among the organisations he has worked with on research and other projects relating to China, are FC Barcelona, Tottenham Hotspur, Nielsen Research, the Deutsche Fussball Bund, the Chinese Football Association, Octagon Marketing, China Everbright, Sina, Tencent, the BBC and the British Council. He has also written columns on Chinese football for Newsweek, Reuters, China Daily, and Asia and the Pacific Policy Society.

 

Julie Yu-Wen Chen

Julie Yu-Wen Chen

Julie Yu-Wen Chen, Professor of Chinese Studies and Finnish Director of Confucius Institute at the University of Helsinki in Finland. She is concurrently "Hosting Professor" (Hosťujúci profesor) at the Department of Asian Studies at Palacky University in Czech Republic. Prof Chen edits Asian Ethnicity (Routledge) and is assistant editor of the Journal of Chinese Political Science (Springer). Prof Chen is the academic liaison for the University of Helsinki at the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based in Denmark as well as the Nordic Center in Fudan University, China.

She formerly held academic positions at Nazarbayev University (Kazakhstan), University College Cork (Ireland) and Academia Sinica (Taiwan). She was also visiting scholar at La Trobe University, University of Virginia, University of Tokyo, University of Tübingen, University of Nottingham, and University of Macau. In 2011, Prof Chen provided testimony in the public hearing of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission on "China's Foreign Policy: Challenges and Players" in Washington D.C.

 

J Michael Cole

J. Michael Cole

China-U.S.-Taiwan relations; Taiwan Straits military issues; People's Liberation Army; Civil Society-building in Taiwan; U.S. arms sales in Taiwan; Espionage; East China Sea; Asymmetrical Warfare; couter-Proliferation; Terrorism.

 

John Delury

John Delury

John Delury is associate professor of Chinese Studies at Yonsei University Graduate School of International Studies in Seoul, South Korea. A historian of modern China, his first book, Wealth and Power: China's Long March to the Twenty-First Century, co-authored with Orville Schell, was published by Random House in 2013, and his writings appear in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Global Asia, Journal of Asian Studies and 38 North. He is now working on a book on US-China relations in the early Cold War, and also follows Korean Peninsula affairs closely.

He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, National Committee on US-China Relations, National Committee on North Korea, and senior fellow at the Asia Society and Pacific Century Institute. He taught briefly at Brown, Columbia, and Peking Universities, and served as associate director of Asia Society's Center on US-China Relations. He received his BA, MA and PhD in history from Yale University, and has lived in Seoul with his wife and their three children since 2010.

 

Christopher Dent

Christopher M. Dent

Christopher M. Dent is Professor of East Asia's International Political Economy, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Leeds, UK. His research interests centre on the international political economy of East Asia and the Asia-Pacific, particularly issues relating to energy, trade, development, climate change strategy and regional economic co-operation and integration. He is the author of 14 books and over 90 academic articles and other papers. His latest book, East Asian Regionalism, 2nd Edition (Routledge 2016) was awarded the Masayoshi Ohira Memorial Foundation 'Special Prize'.

He has acted as a consultant advisor to the British, Australian, Chilean, German, Lao PDR and United States governments, as well as the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, ASEAN Secretariat, APEC Secretariat, Secretariat for Central American Economic Integration and Nike Inc. He has been an invited speaker at conferences and other events in Asia, Europe, North America, Latin America, Africa, Middle East and Oceania. Professor Christopher Dent is also an Expert (Brains Trust) member of the Evian Group.

 

Dafydd Fell

Dafydd J. Fell

Dafydd J. Fell is the Reader in Comparative Politics with special reference to Taiwan at the Department of Political and International Studies of the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. He is also the Director of the SOAS Centre of Taiwan Studies. In 2004 he helped establish the European Association of Taiwan Studies.

He has published numerous articles on political parties and electioneering in Taiwan. His first book was Party Politics in Taiwan (Routledge, 2005), which analysed party change in the first 15 years of multi-party competition. In 2006 he co-edited What has Changed? Taiwan's KMT and DPP Eras in Comparative Perspective (Harrassowitz), a volume examining the impact of the first change in ruling parties in Taiwan. In 2008 he edited a four volume reference collection of articles titled Politics of Modern Taiwan (Routledge). His latest book is Government and Politics in Taiwan (Rouledge, 2011). He recently co-edited Migration to and from Taiwan (Routledge, 2013). He is also the book series editor for the Routledge Research on Taiwan Series.

 

Isaac Stone-Fish

Isaac Stone Fish

Isaac Stone Fish is a journalist and a senior fellow at the Asia Society's Center on U.S.-China Relations in New York City; he is also a visiting fellow at the German Marshall Fund, an on-air contributor to CBSN, and an international affairs analyst for PRI's The World. Previously he served as Foreign Policy Magazine's Asia Editor: he managed coverage of the region, and wrote about the politics, economics, and international affairs of China, Japan, and North Korea. A fluent Mandarin speaker and formerly a Beijing correspondent for Newsweek, Stone Fish spent seven years living in China prior to joining Foreign Policy. He has traveled widely in the region and in the country, visiting every Chinese province, autonomous region, and municipality.

His views on international affairs have been widely quoted, including in MSNBC, ABC, NPR, CBS, CNN, the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, Slate, The Guardian, the BBC, the Sydney Morning Herald, Talking Points Memo, and Al-Jazeera, among others; and in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese, and Vietnamese media. Besides publishing in Foreign Policy, Stone Fish’s articles have also appeared in The New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Slate, The New Republic, Politico Magazine, The Daily Beast, Time, and the Los Angeles Times. While in Beijing, he served on the board of the Foreign Correspondent’s Club of China, and, when the sky wasn't the color of glue, was an avid runner.

Stone Fish is a graduate of Columbia University, where he studied Chinese literature. He is also a Truman National Security Project fellow and an alumni of the World Economic Forum Global Shaper's program.

 

Reza Hasmath

Reza Hasmath

Reza Hasmath (PhD, Cambridge) is a Professor in Political Science at the University of Alberta. He has previously held faculty positions in management, sociology and political science at the Universities of Toronto, Melbourne and Oxford, and has worked for think-tanks, consultancies, development agencies, and NGOs in USA, Canada, UK, Australia and China. His award-winning research can be summarized in fourfold: (1) examining the education and labour market experiences of ethnic minorities in the North American, Australian and Chinese contexts; (2) analysing state-society relationships in China, with an emphasis on NGO activities; (3) investigating how the behaviour of emerging state and non-state actors potentially affect salient theories, practices and assumptions in international development and international affairs; and, (4) assessing the evolving behaviour of policy actors and the citizenry, and their subsequent impact, in advanced authoritarian institutional environments. View his research website.

 

Ho-Ming Sho

Ming-sho Ho

Ming-sho Ho is Professor in the Department of Sociology at National Taiwan University. His major research interests lie in social movements, labour and environmental issues. He recently published Working Class Formation in Taiwan (2014, Palgrave Macmillan) and has published dozens of academic articles on these issues, primarily in the Taiwan context. He is working on a monograph comparing Hong Kong's Umbrella Movement and Taiwan's Sunflower Movement.

 

Jennifer Hsu

Jennifer Hsu

Jennifer Hsu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Alberta, Canada. Her research interests broadly covers state-society and state-NGO relations, and the internationalisation of Chinese NGOs. She has recently commenced a new research project looking at Chinese development assistance in Myanmar and Vietnam. She has published in various high-ranking journals including Journal of Contemporary China, Progress in Development Studies, The China Quarterly, Third World Quarterly and Urban Studies.

Her recent publications include a co-authored book HIV/AIDS in China - The Economic and Social Determinants and a co-edited volume NGO Governance and Management in China. Her monograph: State of Exchange: NGOs and the Chinese Government with the University of British of Columbia Press will be released in early 2017.

 

Chris Hughes

Christopher R Hughes

Christopher R Hughes is a Professor of International Relations and the Head of the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics. He received his PhD from the Department of International Relations at the LSE in 1995, for which he was awarded the British International Studies Association annual thesis prize and served as Director of the LSE’s Asia Research Centre from 2002 to 2005.

Christopher speaks Mandarin and his primary areas of expertise are on the Asia-Pacific with a focus on Chinese foreign and security policy and Taiwan and as well as publications on nationalism in both states. He has written extensively on Japan, the Korean peninsula and Southeast Asia. His most recent peer reviewed articles include When big powers pivot, the little states roll: Southeast Asia between China and Japan (2014) and Confucius Institutes and the university: distinguishing the political mission from the cultural (2013).

 

Johan Lagerkvist

Johan Lagerkvist

Johan Lagerkvist is a professor of Chinese language and culture at the Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies at Stockholm University. He is also a Senior Research Fellow on the East Asia Program of the Swedish Institute of International Affairs. His primary research areas are on Chinese state-society relations, modern Chinese history, political culture and China's media system and politics.

He has published multiple articles and book chapters on the implications of China’s rise for Sweden and the international system more broadly. His most recent peer reviewed articles include "As China returns: perceptions of land grabbing and spatial power relations in Mozambique" (2014) and "Loyal Dissent in the Chinese Blogosphere: Sina Weibo discourse on the Chinese Communist Party" (2013).

 

Daniel Large

Daniel Large

Daniel Large is an Assistant Professor at the School of Public Policy, Central European University, Budapest. He is also a research associate of the South African Institute of International Affairs, a fellow of the Rift Valley Institute and director of its digital Sudan Open Archive (www.sudanarchive.net).

His publications include China Returns to Africa: A Rising Power and a Continent Embrace (London Hurst 2008), co-edited with Chris Alden and Ricardo Soares de Oliveira; Sudan Looks East: China, India and the Politics of Asian Alternatives (Oxford: James Currey, 2011), co-edited with Luke Patey, and the forthcoming New Directions in China-Africa Studies (Routledge), which he is co-editing with Chris Alden.

 

James Leibold

James Leibold

James Leibold is an Associate Professor in Politics and Asian studies at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia. He's the author of over 20 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on ethnicity, race and nationalism in modern China, and a frequent contributor to the international media on these topics. His books include Minority Education in China, co-edited with Chen Yangbin (Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2014); Ethnic Policy in China (Honolulu: East-West Centre, 2013); Critical Han Studies, co-edited with Thomas Mullaney, Stéphane Gros, and Eric Vanden Bussche (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012); Reconfiguring Chinese nationalism (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). He can be found on Twitter at @jleibold.

 

Mikael Mattlin

Dr Mikael Mattlin

Mikael Mattlin is acting Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Helsinki, from where he received his doctoral degree in political science. He also holds a Collegium Researcher position at the Turku Institute for Advanced Studies (TIAS) and a lectureship at the University of Turku. He runs the Helsinki-based Foundation for Foreign Policy Research, and occasionally acts as high-level Chinese interpreter.

His most recent book Politicized Society: Taiwan’s Struggle with its One-Party Past was published in April 2018 by NIAS Press (Copenhagen University). The book is a revised and expanded second edition of his acclaimed 2011 book. His peer-reviewed journal articles have appeared eg in The China Quarterly, Cooperation and Conflict, Journal of Contemporary China, Issues and Studies, Asia-Europe Journal and East Asia.

 

W John Morgan

W. John Morgan

Professor Morgan is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Education, University of Nottingham, where he was also UNESCO Chair of the Political Economy of Education; Senior Fellow, the China Policy Institute; and Acting-Director of the Institute of Asian Pacific Studies; He has also worked in adult and further education as a Workers' Educational Association tutor-organiser and as a college lecturer. His current research interests are in: Comparative political economy of education: especially Russia and China; civil society and the anthropology of knowledge; ethics and social research; and peace education. He is now at the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research and Data (WISERD).

 

Gary Rawnsley

Gary Rawnsley

Professor Rawnsley joined the Department of International Politics in 2013. He was previously Professor of International Communications at the University of Leeds and Director of the Institute of Communications Studies. He was also the founding Dean and Head of International Studies at the University of Nottingham, Ningbo China (UNNC, 2005-7). Professor Rawnsley has held visiting positions in Australia, Hong Kong and Taiwan and is a member of the AHRC Peer Review College. He is book reviews editor of the Journal of International Communication and serves on the editorial boards of the Asian Journal of Communication, the American Journal of Chinese Studies and Media and Communication. Professor Rawnsley is also a member of the Soft Power Advocacy and Research Centre at Macquarie University and an External Fellow of the China Policy Institute at The University of Nottingham.

 

Ming-Yeh Rawnsley

Ming-Yeh Rawnsley

Media and Democratisation in Taiwan and China; East Asian Cinema; Taiwan Cinema; Chinese-language Cinema; Trans-disciplinary science communications in Taiwan and in the UK; Literature, Media and Culture of Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau.

 

Michael Reilly

Michael Reilly

Michael Reilly spent over 30 years working for the FCO, more than half of it dealing with UK policy towards East and South East Asia. He has a diploma in Korean from Yonsei University in Seoul as well as a doctorate in Economic history from the University of Liverpool. He has served in British embassies in Korea and the Philippines as well as in the UK Delegation to the OECD. His final FCO appointment was as Director of the British Trade and Cultural office in Taipei. He joined the private sector on leaving the FCO in 2009 and from 2011 to 2014 was BAE Systems' Chief Representative in China, based in Beijing.

 

Shelley Rigger

Shelley Rigger

Shelley Rigger is the Brown Professor of East Asian Politics, Chair of Political Science, and Chair of Chinese Studies at Davidosn College. She has a PhD in Government from Havard University and a BA in Public and International Affairs from Princetown University. She has been a visitng researcher at National Chengchi University in Taiwan (2005) and a visiting professor at Fudan University (2006) and Shanghai Jiaotong University (2013).

Rigger is the author of two books on Taiwan's domestic politics, Politics in Taiwan: Voting for Democracy (Routledge 1999) and From Opposition to Power: Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party (Lynne Rienner Publishers 2001). In 2011 she published Why Taiwan Matters: Small Island, Global Powerhouse, a book for general readers. She has published articles on Taiwan's domestic politics, the national identity issue in Taiwan-China relations and related topics. Her monograph, "Taiwan's Rising Rationalism: Generations, Politics and Taiwan Nationalism" was published by East West Center in Washington in November 2006, Cureently she is working on a study of Taiwan's contributions to the PRC's economic take-off.

 

Barry Sautman

Barry Sautman

Barry Sautman is a Visiting Professor at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology where he teaches primarily on Sino-American relations, Chinese politics, international law and nationalism and ethnicity within China with a focus on the issue of Xinjiang and Tibet. Sautman received his PhD in Political Science from Columbia University in 1990 and prior to his current role was a Visiting Assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing Centre for Chinese and American Studies.

Sautman has authored numerous articles including East Mountain Tiger, West Mountain Tiger: China, Africa, the West and "Colonialism" (2007) and China's Vulnerability to Ethnic Minority Separatism in Tibet (2005) as well as writing for the Guardian, South China Morning Post and ChinaFile.

 

Gunter Schubert

Gunter Schubert

Gunter Schubert is Professor of Greater China Studies at the Institute of Asian and Oriental Studies' Department of Chinese and Korean Studies, Tübingen University, Germany. He is also the founder and current director of the European Research Center on Contemporary Taiwan (ERCCT) at that university and a professor at Tübingen University's Department of Political Science. He has a PhD from the University of Hamburg (Political Science). Schubert has been a visiting professor and visiting scholar to numerous universities in the PRC, Taiwan and Hong Kong since 2003, including Taiwan's renowned Academia Sinica.

He has published extensively in Western languages and Chinese. His most recent books are: The Taiwan Handbook of Contemporary Taiwan (editor; Routledge 2016); The China Impact on Taiwan (editor, Routledge 2016); 主动的地方政治 – 作为战略群体的县乡干部 (Proactive Local Politics: County and Township Cadres as Strategic Group), Beijing: Central Compilation and Translation Press, 2013 (co-edited by Thomas Heberer and Yang Xuedong). Currently, he is working on a monograph on the development of private entrepreneurship in the PRC.

 

Dorothy Solinger

Dorothy J. Solinger

Dorothy J. Solinger is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Irvine. Her current work is on urban poverty and the welfare program that addresses this in China. Her most recent book is States' Gains, Labor's Losses (Cornell University Press, 2009), selected as an Outstanding Academic Title by Choice magazine. She is the author of six single-authored books and editor or co-editor of five other books in addition to nearly 100 book chapters and articles. Her book Contesting Citizenship in Urban China (University of California Press, 1999) won the Joseph R. Levenson Prize of the Association for Asian Studies as the best book on 20th-century China published in 1999.

She is also co-editor off Socialism Vanquished, Socialism Challenged: Eastern Europe and China, 1989-2009 (Oxford University Press, 2012). She was twice elected to serve as the Chair of the China and Inner Asian Council of the Association for Asian Studies (1988-89; 2013-14) and has held fellowships from The Hoover Institution, The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the American Council on Learned Societies, the Ford Foundation, and The Smith Richardson Foundation, among other institutions.

 

Alex Tan

Alex Tan

Alex Tan is Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of Canterbury (New Zealand), University Chair Professor of Political Science (adjunct) at National Chengchi University (Taiwan), and Honorary Professor of the New Zealand Defence Force Command and Staff College. He received his AB in Economics from the Ateneo de Manila University, MA in Economics from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and PhD in Political Science from Texas A&M University.

Professor Tan has published numerous books and academic articles in the areas of comparative political parties and elections, comparative political economy, Taiwan politics and East Asian international relations. His most recent books include Taiwan's Political Economy: Meeting Challenges, Pursuing Progress (co-authored with Cal Clark) published by Lynne Rienner Publishers and Mixed-Member Electoral System in Constitutional Context: Taiwan, Japan and Beyond (co-edited with Nathan Batto, Chi Huang, and Gary Cox) published by the University of Michigan Press.

 

May Tan-Mullins

May Tan-Mullins

May Tan-Mullins is Professor in International Relations at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China. She is the Dean of Graduate School, Director of Institute of Asia and Pacific Studies and also the series editor of Palgrave Series in Asia and Pacific Studies. Her research interests are political ecology of rising China, environmental and energy justice, poverty alleviation and building resilience for the poorest and most vulnerable. Based on her expertise in various development and human security issues, she is also a consultant for the UNDP, National Bureau of Asian Research (US), the Revenue Watch Institute (US) and the Chinese government. 

Professor May Tan-Mullins has also been awarded the Rockefeller Bellagio writing residency working on 'Social resilience in Chinese Eco-cities'. Some of her most current research project is together with colleagues from King’s College London UK, TU-Delft, Freiburg University Germany and University of Toulouse I Capitole where they were awarded €1,284,319 by European and Chinese funders for 'Smart eco-cities for a green economy: a comparative study of Europe and China' (2015-2018). Another project is with the School of Oriental and African Studies and Open University, funded by the ESRC UK, is to conduct research on Chinese hydropower dams and their impact on Africa and Asia (2012-2016).

 

Ian Taylor

Ian Taylor

Ian Taylor is Professor in International Relations and African Political Economy at St Andrews where he teaches on Africa's international relations, conflict and security within Africa and on the Rwandan genocide. He is the Chair Professor in the School of International Studies at Renmin University of China, a Professor Extraordinary in Political Science at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa and was the Lee Hysan Visiting Professor, Centre for China Studies, Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Since 1994 he has studied China's relations with Africa and has conducted extensive fieldwork on the subject authoring 10 academic books and 70 articles. Taylor's latest book "Global Governance and Transnationalising Capitalist Hegemony: The Myth of the Emerging Powers" is to be published in December 2016. Prior to entering academia, Ian Taylor worked for the UN Refugee Agency, based in Hong Kong and focused on alleviating the plight of Vietnam's 'Boat People'.

 

Jessica Teets

Jessica C. Teets

Jessica C. Teets is an Associate Professor in the Political Science Department at Middlebury College, and Associate Editor of the Journal of Chinese Political Science. Her research focuses on governance and policy innovation in authoritarian regimes, specifically the role played by civil society. She is the author of Civil Society Under Authoritarianism: The China Model (Cambridge University Press, 2014) and editor (with William Hurst) of Local Governance Innovation in China: Experimentation, Diffusion, and Defiance (Routledge Contemporary China Series, 2014), and is currently researching models of policy experimentation by local governments in China.

 

Jeffrey Wasserstrom

Jeffrey Wasserstrom

Jeffrey Wasserstrom is Chancellor's Professor of History at UC Irvine, where he edits the Journal of Asian Studies and holds courtesy affiliations with the Law School and the Literary Journalism Program. He has written five books, including Student Protests in Twentieth Century China (1991), China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know (2010 and 2013 editions), and Eight Juxtapositions: China through Imperfect Analogies from Mark Twain to Manchukuo (2016). He has edited or co-edited several others, including, most recently, The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China (2012).

In addition to writing for academic journals, he has contributed to many general interest venues, among them the New York Times, the TLS, Time, the Wall Street Journal, the FT, the Guardian, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, and New Left Review. He was a co-founder of the China Beat blog, which ran from 2008 until 2012, and served a term on the Board of Directors of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations. An Associate Fellow at the Asia Society, he is on Dissent Magazine, Urban History, and Social History's editorial boards, and is advising editor for China at the Los Angeles Review of Books. He tweets @jwassers.

 

Cara Willis

Cara Wallis

Cara Willis is an Associate Professor at Texas A&M University and a multidisciplinary scholar whose work has focused predominantly on mobile communication technology, gender and on China studies. Her most recent publication in 2015 was titled 'Gender and China's Online Censorship Protest Culture'. She has an MA from the University of California and attained her PhD from the University of Southern California.

Cara's book Technomobility in China: Young Migrant Women and Mobile Phones was published by New York University Press in 2013.

 

Andrew Wedeman

Andrew Wedeman

Andrew Wedeman is a professor of political science at Georgia State University where he heads up the China Studies Initiative. He has previously been a Visiting Associate Professor of Political Science at the Johns Hopkins Nanjing University Center for Sino-American Studies and a Fulbright Research Professor at Taiwan National University. He has written extensively on China on topics including Sino-American relations, corruption within China and cross strait ties with Taiwan. His most recent book is Double Paradox: Rapid Growth and Rising Corruption in China (2012) published by Cornell University Press and Wedeman is currently writing a book tentative entitled Slating Flies and Hunting Tigers: Xi Jinping's War on Corruption expected in 2017.

 

Dali Yang

Dali L. Yang

Dali L. Yang is the William Claude Reavis Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago and a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. Between 2010 and June 2016, he served as the founding Faculty Director of the University of Chicago Center in Beijing, a university-wide initiative to promote collaboration and exchange between UChicago scholars and students and their Chinese counterparts. Professor Yang's research is focused on the politics of China's development and governance. His current projects include studies of social regulation, environmental governance, social and political trust, and state-society relations. He also continues to examine the political economy of the Great Leap Famine (1959-1961), the worst in human history.

Among his books are Remaking the Chinese Leviathan: Market Transition and the Politics of Governance in China (Stanford University Press, 2004); Calamity and Reform in China: State, Rural Society and Institutional Change since the Great Leap Famine (Stanford University Press, 1996); and Beyond Beijing: Liberalization and the Regions in China (Routledge, 1997). Professor Yang has previously served in a number of other academic leadership roles and is a member of the Committee of 100, a member of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, and a member of the China Committee of the Chicago Sister Cities International Program. He is also on the Advisory Board of the Paulson Institute at the University of Chicago.

 

Guobin Yang

Guobin Yang

Guobin Yang is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of The Power of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online (Columbia University Press, 2009), The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (Columbia University Press, 2016), and Dragon-Carving and the Literary Mind (2 vols, Beijing, 2003). He is the editor of China's Contested Internet (2015), The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China (with Jacques deLisle and Avery Goldstein, 2016), and Re-Envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China (with Ching-Kwan Lee, 2007). He co-edits the new SAGE journal Communication and the Public. He tweets at @Yangguobin. View more information.

 

 

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