Taiwan Studies Programme
   
   
  

Innovation Workshop

Date(s)
Wednesday 13th November 2013 (12:30-15:30)
Contact
Chun-Yi Lee (chun-yi.lee@nottingham.ac.uk)
Description

Schedule: 

 

  • 12:30-13:30 - Sandwich buffet lunch 
  • 13:30-15:30 - Roundtable discussion

 

Prof. Joseph Wong 

Presentation Title:

Poverty, Invisibility and the Re-distributive Potential of Innovation

Abstract: 

While we have a pretty good sense of the productivity gains from innovation, the distributive effects of innovation are less well understood; even less well understood is the re-distributive potential of innovation. My talk will consider the political economy of poverty in the developing world, and emerging technological, business and organizational innovations aimed at mitigating the effects of such poverty. Drawing on real-world case studies, the key issues to be discussed include frugal innovation, end-user adoption, scaling-up, and the challenges of social impact measurement.

 

 

 

Dr. Christos Braziotis 

Presentation Title: 

Operations Management and Innovation

Abstract:

The presentation will briefly introduce the major operations-enabled structures that facilitate innovation within and outside the organisational boundaries. The inter-organisational perspective will be briefly explored by introducing the agile project management approach. The intra-organisational perspective will be explored by introducing the extended enterprise, a recent paradigm shift in the domain of supply chain management. 

 

 

 

Dr. Yutao Sun

Presentation Title: 

Are Mega-Engineering Programs Appropriate for Industrial Innovation? A Framework for Examining China's State-Led Innovation Model

Abstract:

The presentation will propose a framework for examining China's state-led innovation model by way of the mega-engineering programs under China's Medium and Long-Term Plan for the Development of Science and Technology. The framework involves two dimensions - industrial characteristics (end-user, market power and technical goal) and government intervention (direct, indirect and environment). Base on the present framework and analysis of ten selected cases, we will identify the preconditions for implementing the mega-engineering programs.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Cong Cao

Presentation Title: 

Trajectory of China’s High-Tech Development: The ‘Growing Pains/Premature Senility’ Thesis Revisited

Abstract:

In a 2004 paper, "Zhongguancun and China's High-Tech Parks in Transition: 'Growing Pains' or 'Premature Senility'?", I introduced the terms - "growing pains" and "premature senility" - to contrast the temporary challenges facing China in pursuing high-tech industrialization and the possibility that China suffers from a terminate "illness" that may deprive China of the momentum in its innovation push. Revisiting the thesis some eight years later, I report that many of the problems identified in the previous paper have persisted. In particular, the overwhelming role of government may derail the trajectory of China's high-tech development.

 

 

 

Dr. Chun-Yi Lee

Presentation title:

Made in Taiwan, produced in China: The Taiwan-China innovation connection

Abstract:

IT products nowadays traded in the global market mainly were produced by Taiwanese companies, but made by Chinese labour; these goods occupied a great percentage of the global market. China in fact could be seen either as Taiwan's manufacturer platform or a competitor. However, it is interesting to evaluate to what extent the 'Chi-wan' IT products climb up on the ladder of innovation.

 

 

 

 

All welcome!

Taiwan Studies Programme

Institute of Asia and Pacific Studies
University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD