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Cisco Gooding

Research Fellow, Faculty of Science

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Expertise Summary

Canadian theoretical physicist with primary research interest in developing a quantum theory of gravity, and deriving observational consequences that can be tested experimentally. Other research interests include quantum foundations, information theory, analogue gravity, optomechanics, and cosmology. Fluent in Python and Matlab, and skilled in many forms of analytic problem solving, mathematical modeling, and data visualization.

Research Summary

Working at the Black Hole Laboratory at the University of Nottingham, supervised by Silke Weinfurtner. Developing ideas for analogue quantum gravity and the next generation of superradiance… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Working at the Black Hole Laboratory at the University of Nottingham, supervised by Silke Weinfurtner. Developing ideas for analogue quantum gravity and the next generation of superradiance experiments. Building an experiment to observe superradiant amplification of orbital angular momentum beams using acoustic vortices and a rotating sound absorber.

Past Research

PhD Work at UBC (Canada): Constructed a general-relativistic model of a self-gravitating interferometer, under the supervision of William G. Unruh. Examined the resulting interference pattern for evidence of fundamental coherence limitations, which could result from quantum superpositions of sufficiently "different" spacetime geometries. Used a generalized version of this model to demonstrate a new form of intrinsic decoherence due to self-gravitation.

Undergraduate Work at SFU (Canada): Worked with the SFU Cosmology group, analyzing higher-dimensional spacetime geometries. Under the supervision of Andrei Frolov, I worked within the framework of classical general relativity to analytically study the existence and stability of closed orbits around large compact objects in an arbitrary number of spacetime dimensions. We then studied higher-dimensional black holes, and derived expressions that closely approximate the capture cross sections of five-dimensional doubly-rotating black holes. The robustness of the derived expressions was verified through numerical calculations.

School of Mathematical Sciences

The University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

For all enquiries please visit:
www.nottingham.ac.uk/enquire