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Samantha Harrison

PhD Student & Research Assistant,

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Biography

Samantha achieved a first class BSc (hons) degree in Psychology from the University of Lincoln in 2016. She then stayed in Lincoln to complete her MSc Psychological Research Methods with a distinction. Throughout these degrees Samantha developed a passion for neuroscience and neuropsychological testing which is what drove her towards her current position as a clinical neuroscience PhD student.

Expertise Summary

Samantha has expertise in research methods and analysis within a psychological and neurological setting. She has trained on the functional neuroimaging methods of functional Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (fTCD) and functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS); the latter of which is being used throughout her PhD research.

Her PhD research is exploring whether neuronal factors, such as cross-modal plasticity, can predict successful outcomes in infant cochlear implant recipients. If so, this will allow for pre-surgical testing to be conducted which may help manage patients/parents expectations accordingly. This may also allow for specialised allocation of rehabilitative support, hopefully leading to increasingly successful CI outcomes.

Samantha's other research interests include fNIRS hyperscanning, to assess interbrain synchrony during communication and turn taking.

Research Summary

Samantha's PhD research is exploring whether neuronal factors, such as cross-modal plasticity, can predict successful outcomes in infant cochlear implant recipients. If so, this will allow for… read more

Current Research

Samantha's PhD research is exploring whether neuronal factors, such as cross-modal plasticity, can predict successful outcomes in infant cochlear implant recipients. If so, this will allow for pre-surgical testing to be conducted which may help manage patients/parents expectations accordingly. This may also allow for specialised allocation of rehabilitative support, hopefully leading to increasingly successful CI outcomes.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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