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People in Rehabilitation, Ageing and Well-being

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Rebecca Fisher

Principal Research Fellow, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

Dr Rebecca Fisher is a Principal Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham. Rebecca has a PhD in Neurophysiology and expertise is in the implementation and evaluation of complex interventions in real world settings. Rebecca's current research includes investigation of Early Supported Discharge and Community Stroke services across the UK and organisation of hospital-based stroke rehabilitation services.

Rebecca previously held a Stroke Association Senior Lectureship award, and currently manages a team of five research fellows and five PhD students, with research funding from NIHR, Stroke Association, THIS.Institute, and Health Education England.

Rebecca Fisher is the Rehabilitation and Life After Stroke Workstream lead working with NHS England and NHS Improvement Clinical Policy Unit. Rebecca is also an Associate Director with the Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (SSNAP) leading on the development and delivery of the post-acute elements of SSNAP.

Rebecca has a First class Neuroscience BSc degree and completed PhD and post doctoral research in Neurophysiology at the Institute of Neurology, University College London. Rebecca then spent three years working in Industry developing interests in the translation of scientific principles and understanding into real-world applications.

Expertise Summary

Keywords:

stroke rehabilitation, early supported discharge, service development, implementation, health services research

Research Summary

Dr Rebecca Fisher has nationally recognised expertise in the field of community stroke rehabilitation and on the topic of Early Supported Discharge. She has been leading change across the boundary… read more

Recent Publications

Implementation of Early Supported Discharge and Community Stroke Rehabilitation

Aim: To explore and evaluate what makes effective, evidence based community stroke rehabilitation services and facilitate sustained use of this knowledge in practice.

Research Outputs

Our research has provided clarity on the core components of evidence-based services, and has highlighted challenges faced in delivering rehabilitation in practice.

Knowledge Creation: International Early Supported Discharge (ESD) consensus document that defined core components of an evidence based ESD service and national consensus document on implementation of evidence based community stroke services.

Knowledge Use: Explored contextual factors associated with implementation of ESD based on perspectives of patients, carers, service provider and commissioners.

Implementation interventions: Designed and delivered interactive workshops focused on 'Eligibility for ESD' and 'Effective Data handling' to facilitate evidence based practice.

Evaluate outcomes: Demonstrated the effectiveness of evidence based ESD services in practice.

Impacts

By informing NHS England policy and guidelines, influencing national performance monitoring, developing service specifications, and training NHS staff, we have facilitated improvements in stroke care delivery.

Evidence based service specifications

In collaboration with NHS England an Integrated Community Stroke Service Specification has been developed to facilitate implementation of evidence based community stroke services.

https://www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/clinical-policy/stroke/rehabilitation-pilot-sites/

Regional activities have included developing service specifications for the East Midlands

East Midlands Stroke Early Supported Discharge Service specification

East Midlands Community Stroke Rehabilitation Service specification

Quality Improvement

East Midlands Academic Health Science Network stroke programme (2014-2016) was conducted to drive and sustain evidence based improvements in community stroke care

For more information refer to publications list or email rebecca.fisher@nottingham.ac.uk

Current Research

Dr Rebecca Fisher has nationally recognised expertise in the field of community stroke rehabilitation and on the topic of Early Supported Discharge. She has been leading change across the boundary between research and practice, and is now Rehabilitation and Life after Stroke workstream lead, seconded to the NHS England and NHS Improvement Clinical Policy Unit.

At the University of Nottingham, Rebecca and team lead Stroke Implementation research designed to find ways to ensure the evidence base informs the procurement, content and delivery of stroke care.

Rebecca's expertise is in the implementation and evaluation of complex interventions in real world settings. Research studies include collaborations with the Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme, for which Rebecca is Associate Director, to investigate the effectiveness and sustainability of community stroke services. It's vital that inequality in community based stroke service provision is addressed and that all stroke survivors receive the best evidence based care.

Rebecca was previously a Stroke Association Senior Lecturer and before that led the Stroke Rehabilitation Programme within the East Midlands Academic Health Science Network (EMAHSN) - a partnership focusing on adoption and spread of innovation and best practice within the NHS. Rebecca works in close collaboration with Integrated Stroke Delivery Networks and clinical and local authority partners to promote the development and sustainability of evidence based community stroke services.

Rebecca currently supervises five PhD students and research investigating: provision of stroke care in rural settings, rehabilitation for severe stroke survivors, young carers of stroke survivors, commissioning of stroke services and unmet needs of the Malaysian stroke population.

Rebecca is also co-chair of the Nottingham Stroke Research Partnership group, a stroke survivor group that provides guidance and input to research studies at Nottingham.

Research funding

Measuring performance of an Integrated Community Stroke Service model (ICSS study). NIHR Applied Research Collaboration: £199,450. (2020-2023). R Fisher, A Byrne, J Matthew, S Lewis, P Langhorne, T Robinson, M James, M Walker, D Hargroves, D Lowe.

A home-based rehabilitation intervention for survivors of stroke with severe disability (HORSS study). NIHR Applied Research Collaboration: £199,823 (2020-2023). R Fisher, C Lee, E Russell, F Riley-Bennett, A Byrne, M Walker.

The National Audit Programme: An improvement tool for community stroke care? Health Foundation PhD fellowship: £219,403 (2021-2024). R Fisher, S Lewis.

Creation of a co-designed interdisciplinary team development programme to facilitate evidence based rehabilitation of stroke survivors in hospital (Concord study). CLAHRC East Midlands: £28,074 (2019). RJ Fisher, N Chouliara, M Walker, H Pöstges, A Forster, D Clarke, M Blake, F Jones.

Improving the implementation of supported stroke self-management: what does it look like and what makes it 'work' in different contexts? Stroke Association SA PG 18\100067: £118,688 (2018-2020). L Kidd, T Quinn, K Gallacher, R Fisher, F Jones, H Mason, K Brennan, M Barber, T Lebedis, M Smith.

What is the impact of large scale implementation of stroke Early Supported Discharge? NIHR HS & DR: £618,548.90 (2017-2020). RJ Fisher, M Walker, P Langhorne, T Robinson, S Lewis, J Waring, C Geue, A Hoffman, A Rudd

Stroke Association HRH The Princess Margaret Senior Lectureship Award. Stroke Association: £221,943 (2016-2021). RJ Fisher.

Links

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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