Triangle

Course overview

Taking an advanced nursing course is a real investment in your career. We have excellent links with local NHS trusts and many of our graduates find they achieve promotion during or soon after their course.

Our programme has been carefully designed to advance nursing practice and improve patient care. In clinical practice, applicants for senior and advanced nursing posts are increasingly expected to be working towards, masters-level qualifications.

You will join students from diverse clinical backgrounds, including acute and community care settings. Many come from the UK, but also further afield: all share a common commitment to advancing the nursing profession. Learning from each other, as much as from experienced teachers, you will develop new friendships and share practice.

One of our graduates was named post-registration 'Student of the Year' at the 2020 Student Nursing Times Awards, recognising their achievements in both academic work and service development.

Why choose this course?

Award-winning nurses

in the Student Nursing Times Awards 2020

86%

of research activity is rated as world-leading and internationally excellent with significant impact on people's health and well-being

School of Health Sciences, REF 2014

Diverse backgrounds

Join students from diverse clinical backgrounds, including acute and community care settings.

Course content

You will explore and evaluate the status of (and potential for) advanced nursing in national and international contexts; consolidate and extend theoretical knowledge and practical skills in the delivery of nursing care; achieve mastery in the critical analysis of research, policy and scholarship relevant to advancing nursing; prepare for leadership roles in health care practice, education and research; engage in a research or scholarly project aimed at advancing nursing within the student's specialist field.

We recognise that each student has their own starting point and we guide you through the course according to your individual needs.

MSc Advanced Nursing comprises 180 credits worth of core and optional modules. This includes the dissertation project. 

PGDip Advanced Nursing comprises 120 credits worth of core and optional modules but does not include the dissertation project.

Modules

Core modules

The Principles and Methods of Evidence Based Practice in Health and Social Care 20 credits

This module will commence with a critical review of the forms of evidence that underpin professional practice in health and social care. The ideology of evidence-based practice will be analysed and its impact on practice evaluated, including an examination of the barriers to using evidence in practice. The module will then move on to examine the following areas:

  • the principles of critical and systematic literature review;
  • issues in the application of clinical guidelines and protocols;
  • techniques for auditing/evaluating services and policies;
  • critical analysis of the clinical decision-making process;
  • the process of generating evidence through empirical research;
  • qualitative and quantitative research paradigms and methods.
Dimensions of Advanced Nursing 20 credits

This module will consolidate your understanding of the historical and contemporary context for advanced nursing. It aims to equip you with a critical understanding of the application of personal and professional frameworks for advancing nursing. It will introduce the theoretical and practical concepts central to advanced nursing within national and international contexts.

Leadership and Governance in Health and Social Care 20 credits

This module considers the following:

  • Defining and evaluating approaches to healthcare governance
  • Theories of leadership and followership, and their relation to governance processes
  • The benefits and challenges of improving healthcare governance
  • The importance of environmental context and culture in the process of understanding and improving healthcare governance
  • The practical skills of governance required to implement improvement
Dissertation Project 60 credits

This module will require you to work on a project designed to advance nursing within your specialist area.

This will enable you to demonstrate advanced academic skills through the completion of a substantial research or practice improvement project.

Optional modules

The remaining 60 credits are accrued by selecting 20 credit optional modules from the School of Health Sciences. Example modules include:

High Dependency and Critical Care for Neonate, Infant or Child 1 20 credits

This module explores issues of a politico-social nature, biological science (cardiac, respiratory and renal) and clinical practice to enhance decision-making in practice for this group of neonates, infants and children and their families within a high technological environment.

There is a focus on the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, cardiac and renal systems will lead into the pathophysiology of these identified systems.

This module is available during the autumn semester.

Advanced Clinical Decision-Making 20 credits

This module will explore the types of clinical decisions nurses are making in practice today. The generic principles of clinical decision-making and the processes and skills required for safe practice will be examined. The wider influences on professionals working in clinical areas will be reviewed and the impact of these factors will be discussed.

You will consider legal professional and ethical concerns, as well as political and economic constraints. You will be encouraged to reflect on your assessment tools and care planning approaches with a view to improving your practice. Problem solving scenarios will be used to stimulate discussion and best practice highlighted.

You will be able to critique your own situations and the tools you use and work toward improving your service provision. There will be a constant focus on the development of advanced nursing practice.

This module is available during the autumn semester.

Contemporary Care of the Critically Ill Adult 20 credits

On this module you will appraise and evaluate the evidence base of the physiological and psychosocial needs of the critically ill adult.

Topics you'll cover include:

  • assessment and monitoring the critically ill adult Altered physiology in critical illness
  • psychosocial effects of critical illness on the patient and their significant others
  • role of the multi-disciplinary team in care of the critically ill adult
  • contemporary therapies and interventions utilised in management of critically ill adults

This module is available during the autumn semester.

Contemporary Cancer Therapies and Care 20 credits

This module will advance your knowledge and expertise and develop specialist clinical decision-making skills related to the diagnosis and treatment of a range of cancers.

Topics you'll cover include:

  • the principles and biological effects of cancer treatment modalities: surgery, cytotoxic drugs, radiation therapy, hormones therapy, biological/targeted therapy, clinical trials and complementary therapies
  • the assessment and management of adverse effects of these cancer therapies
  • ethical, legal and moral aspects of treatment, decision making, information provision and informed consent
  • psychological, social and economic impact of cancer therapy and strategies to support individual and families
  • the management of acute oncological events
  • the importance of user involvement in planning services and care

This module is delivered during the spring semester.

Contemporary Theory and Practice in Palliative and End of Life Care 20 credits

Retrieve and critically evaluate a range of evidence relevant to palliative and end of life care delivery across health and social care practice including managing complex symptoms and make recommendations based on the best evidence identified for the benefit of patients and clients.

This module is delivered during the spring semester.

High Dependency and Critical Care for Neonate, Infant or Child 2 20 credits

This module explores issues of a socio-political nature, biological science (neurological, gastro-intestinal and thermoregulation) and clinical practice to enhance decision-making in practice for this group of neonates, infants and children and their families within a high technological environment.

A focus on the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, cardiac and renal systems will lead into the pathophysiology of these identified systems.

Face-to-face sessions cater for the specialities of neonates, children’s high dependency care and children’s intensive care. Management topics will include neonatal surgical issues, trauma care of children, nutrition, advocacy, consent, family issues, palliative care and bereavement.

This module is available during the spring semester.

Learning and Assessment in Healthcare Education 20 credits

This module will consolidate and extend your knowledge of the theories and principles underpinning teaching, learning and assessment. Specifically, this is done in relation to health care subjects, and considers education in both academic and practice settings.

The contextual factors that influence the role of health care teachers will be explored and the implications of these for your learning in modern health care settings will be debated. The tensions that exist between theory and practice will be examined in the context of contemporary policy issues and research.

This module is available during the spring semester.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on Thursday 01 July 2021.

Core modules

The Principles and Methods of Evidence Based Practice in Health and Social Care 20 credits

This module will commence with a critical review of the forms of evidence that underpin professional practice in health and social care. The ideology of evidence-based practice will be analysed and its impact on practice evaluated, including an examination of the barriers to using evidence in practice. The module will then move on to examine the following areas:

  • the principles of critical and systematic literature review;
  • issues in the application of clinical guidelines and protocols;
  • techniques for auditing/evaluating services and policies;
  • critical analysis of the clinical decision-making process;
  • the process of generating evidence through empirical research;
  • qualitative and quantitative research paradigms and methods.
Dimensions of Advanced Nursing 20 credits

This module will consolidate your understanding of the historical and contemporary context for advanced nursing. It aims to equip you with a critical understanding of the application of personal and professional frameworks for advancing nursing. It will introduce the theoretical and practical concepts central to advanced nursing within national and international contexts.

Leadership and Governance in Health and Social Care 20 credits

This module considers the following:

  • Defining and evaluating approaches to healthcare governance
  • Theories of leadership and followership, and their relation to governance processes
  • The benefits and challenges of improving healthcare governance
  • The importance of environmental context and culture in the process of understanding and improving healthcare governance
  • The practical skills of governance required to implement improvement

Optional modules

The remaining 60 credits are accrued by selecting 20 credit optional modules from the School of Health Sciences. Example modules include:

High Dependency and Critical Care for Neonate, Infant or Child 1 20 credits

This module explores issues of a politico-social nature, biological science (cardiac, respiratory and renal) and clinical practice to enhance decision-making in practice for this group of neonates, infants and children and their families within a high technological environment.

There is a focus on the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, cardiac and renal systems will lead into the pathophysiology of these identified systems.

This module is available during the autumn semester.

Advanced Clinical Decision-Making 20 credits

This module will explore the types of clinical decisions nurses are making in practice today. The generic principles of clinical decision-making and the processes and skills required for safe practice will be examined. The wider influences on professionals working in clinical areas will be reviewed and the impact of these factors will be discussed.

You will consider legal professional and ethical concerns, as well as political and economic constraints. You will be encouraged to reflect on your assessment tools and care planning approaches with a view to improving your practice. Problem solving scenarios will be used to stimulate discussion and best practice highlighted.

You will be able to critique your own situations and the tools you use and work toward improving your service provision. There will be a constant focus on the development of advanced nursing practice.

This module is available during the autumn semester.

Contemporary Care of the Critically Ill Adult 20 credits

On this module you will appraise and evaluate the evidence base of the physiological and psychosocial needs of the critically ill adult.

Topics you'll cover include:

  • assessment and monitoring the critically ill adult Altered physiology in critical illness
  • psychosocial effects of critical illness on the patient and their significant others
  • role of the multi-disciplinary team in care of the critically ill adult
  • contemporary therapies and interventions utilised in management of critically ill adults

This module is available during the autumn semester.

Contemporary Cancer Therapies and Care 20 credits

This module will advance your knowledge and expertise and develop specialist clinical decision-making skills related to the diagnosis and treatment of a range of cancers.

Topics you'll cover include:

  • the principles and biological effects of cancer treatment modalities: surgery, cytotoxic drugs, radiation therapy, hormones therapy, biological/targeted therapy, clinical trials and complementary therapies
  • the assessment and management of adverse effects of these cancer therapies
  • ethical, legal and moral aspects of treatment, decision making, information provision and informed consent
  • psychological, social and economic impact of cancer therapy and strategies to support individual and families
  • the management of acute oncological events
  • the importance of user involvement in planning services and care

This module is delivered during the spring semester.

Contemporary Theory and Practice in Palliative and End of Life Care 20 credits

Retrieve and critically evaluate a range of evidence relevant to palliative and end of life care delivery across health and social care practice including managing complex symptoms and make recommendations based on the best evidence identified for the benefit of patients and clients.

This module is delivered during the spring semester.

High Dependency and Critical Care for Neonate, Infant or Child 2 20 credits

This module explores issues of a socio-political nature, biological science (neurological, gastro-intestinal and thermoregulation) and clinical practice to enhance decision-making in practice for this group of neonates, infants and children and their families within a high technological environment.

A focus on the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, cardiac and renal systems will lead into the pathophysiology of these identified systems.

Face-to-face sessions cater for the specialities of neonates, children’s high dependency care and children’s intensive care. Management topics will include neonatal surgical issues, trauma care of children, nutrition, advocacy, consent, family issues, palliative care and bereavement.

This module is available during the spring semester.

Learning and Assessment in Healthcare Education 20 credits

This module will consolidate and extend your knowledge of the theories and principles underpinning teaching, learning and assessment. Specifically, this is done in relation to health care subjects, and considers education in both academic and practice settings.

The contextual factors that influence the role of health care teachers will be explored and the implications of these for your learning in modern health care settings will be debated. The tensions that exist between theory and practice will be examined in the context of contemporary policy issues and research.

This module is available during the spring semester.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on Thursday 01 July 2021.

Learning and assessment

How you will learn

  • Practical classes
  • Seminars
  • Self-study
  • eLearning
  • Presentation

How you will be assessed

  • Assignments
  • Critical analysis and reflection
  • Dissertation
  • Presentation

Your assessments will be firmly grounded in the realities you face in the workplace, developing skills and knowledge that will lead to practical benefits for you and your team.

 

Contact time and study hours

A full time student can expect to have 1 day per week of timetabled teaching contact time. You will have approximately 60 hours of timetabled teaching contact for each 20 credit module over 8 weeks.

The rest of your study time for each module will be for self-directed independent study.

Entry requirements

All candidates are considered on an individual basis and we accept a broad range of qualifications. The entrance requirements below apply to 2022 entry.

Undergraduate degreeApplicants for the full-time programme must hold a first or second class honours degree (2:2 or above) in nursing or other relevant topic. Applicants for the part-time programme will usually hold a Bachelors degree, or qualifications and experience deemed to be equivalent.
Professional qualification

All applicants must be qualified nurses usually with a minimum of two years experience in nursing practice.

Applying

Because of the intensity of study, particularly the research component, applicants for the full-time programme must hold a first or second class honours degree in nursing or other relevant topic. Applicants for the part-time programme will usually hold a Bachelors degree, or qualifications and experience deemed to be equivalent.

Our step-by-step guide covers everything you need to know about applying.

How to apply

Fees

UK fees are set in line with the national UKRI maximum fee limit. We expect fees for 2022 entry to be confirmed in August 2021.

Additional information for international students

If you are a student from the EU, EEA or Switzerland, you will pay international tuition fees in most cases. If you are resident in the UK and have 'settled' or 'pre-settled' status under the EU Settlement Scheme, you will be entitled to 'home' fee status.

Irish students will be charged tuition fees at the same rate as UK students. UK nationals living in the EU, EEA and Switzerland will also continue to be eligible for ‘home’ fee status at UK universities until 31 December 2027.

For further guidance, check our information for applicants from the EU.

These fees are for full-time study. If you are studying part-time, you will be charged a proportion of this fee each year (subject to inflation).

Additional costs

As a student on this course, you should factor some additional costs into your budget, such as printing, alongside your tuition fees and living expenses. You should be able to access most of the books you’ll need through our libraries, though you may wish to purchase your own copies or more specific titles. If you require any additional vaccinations, these will be at your own expense.

Funding

There are many ways to fund your postgraduate course, from scholarships to government loans.

We also offer a range of international masters scholarships for high-achieving international scholars who can put their Nottingham degree to great use in their careers.

Check our guide to find out more about funding your postgraduate degree.

Postgraduate funding

Careers

We offer individual careers support for all postgraduate students.

Expert staff can help you research career options and job vacancies, build your CV or résumé, develop your interview skills and meet employers.

Each year 1,100 employers advertise graduate jobs and internships through our online vacancy service. We host regular careers fairs, including specialist fairs for different sectors.

International students who complete an eligible degree programme in the UK on a student visa can apply to stay and work in the UK after their course under the Graduate immigration route. Eligible courses at the University of Nottingham include bachelors, masters and research degrees, and PGCE courses.

Graduate destinations

This vocationally-orientated course aims to put you at the cutting-edge of teaching, research and thinking in terms of contemporary nursing practice. You'll gain the skills and experience needed to develop your career and to act as a leader and innovator in the field of nursing.

Recent graduates have gone on to work as clinical nurse specialists, advanced nurse practitioners and modern matrons. Our graduates also work in higher education as lecturers and senior academics, lecturer practitioners, researchers and in private practice.

Career progression

96.9% of postgraduates from the School of Health Sciences secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual salary for these graduates was £29,708.*

*HESA Graduate Outcomes 2020. The Graduate Outcomes % is derived using The Guardian University Guide methodology. The average annual salary is based on graduates working full-time within the UK.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for NHS trusts (such as clinical specialists, advanced practitioners, modern matrons), universities (such as lecturers and senior academics, lecturer practitioners, researchers) and in private practice.

Two masters graduates proudly holding their certificates
" Your support for international students is enormous and UoN will continue to be the destination of choice for international students. Thank you "
Joseph Suglo, MSc Advanced Nursing student 2018, Learning Committee Forum Representative

Related courses

This content was last updated on Thursday 01 July 2021. Every effort has been made to ensure that this information is accurate, but changes are likely to occur given the interval between the date of publishing and course start date. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply.