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Course overview

MA Translation Studies is designed both for professional translators and interpreters wishing to obtain a formal qualification, and for language graduates wishing to become translators or undertake further research studies.

The course combines theoretical and practical training and makes use of our state-of-the-art translation and interpreting facilities.

This course offers two pathways:

  • Translation Studies
  • Translation Studies (with Interpreting)

Both pathways consists of core modules which provide training in translation theory, technological tools, audio-visual and literary translation, between English and up to three of the following languages (though it should be noted that not all pathways or modules are available for all languages):

  • Arabic
  • French
  • German
  • Portuguese
  • Russian
  • Spanish

On the Translation Studies (with Interpreting) pathway you will also have the opportunity to attend a module providing an introduction to interpreting.

Why choose this course?

Specialist skills

Develop your skills as a translator

Excellent facilities

Hone your skills and gain hands-on experience in our state-of-the-art Translation and Interpreting suite.

Meet translators

Opportunities to meet professional translators

Course content

The MA is structured around a series of taught modules and a practical project.

Students may also elect to consolidate one of their languages or start a language as a beginner.

The Targeted Translation Project may take the form of a practical exercise undertaken during a placement with a public body or charity.

There is flexibility to take other modules from outside the ones offered here where they are relevant to the MA or they enhance your language portfolio.

Modules

All students

Audiovisual Translation: Accessibility

This module will allow you to discover accessibility practices. It focuses on the theory and practice(s) of different aspects of audiovisual translation, with the main focus being on subtitling for the deaf and hard-of-hearing and audio description. You will also examine linguistic, technical, and cultural specificities of audiovisual translation in detail. The module will be delivered in a series of weekly two-hour seminars.

Translator's Toolbox

This module introduces the basic concepts of computer-assisted translation tools. Key terms and components such as term base, translation memory and translation editor will be covered in detail in practice-based workshops.

Introduction to Translation Theory

This module explores the different theoretical approaches to translation that have been prominent in the Western world. The module will examine the history of translation, potentially including Comparative Literature, and different translation and transfer models across a range of genres.

For each theory of translation, a number of case studies will be examined, in a variety of different languages, although proficiency in these languages is not a prerequisite, as we will focus on translation dynamics.

Through this module, you are encouraged to develop a critical and reflective approach to translation practice.

Translating Texts

You will be introduced to text types and the different translation approaches to them before applying these ideas in your own translations. This part of the module will be co-taught by specialists in the relevant languages.

Interpretation pathway

You will be expected to take this module:

Introduction to Interpreting

This module introduces you to different forms, modes and models of interpreting as well as the issues that are often encountered by professional interpreters. You will explore the different techniques and skills required for both simultaneous and consecutive interpretation. A weekly skill-based class and a practical class in the interpreter's booth in addition to a lecture allows us to maximise your opportunities to practise the skills you are learning. You will improve your listening, concentration and memory skills, acquire note-taking skills and broaden your understanding of the different communication contexts in which interpreting takes place.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on Friday 30 April 2021.
Targeted Translation Project

This module requires you to demonstrate practical translation skills through translation of a text or series of texts (from English into Chinese (or Chinese into English for home students) .

The commentary, which is 12-15,000 words,  should demonstrate how and why the translator uses the theories s/he has learnt to guide the translation and illustrate in detail the skills and techniques s/he has applied in solving the problems occurred during translation. You will work under the guidance of a supervisor. Options for the project include translation, localisation or subtitling.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on Friday 30 April 2021.

Native English speakers

You will study a language of your choice from a wide selection of European and south-east Asian languages offered at a range of levels.

You will take two 10-credit modules in the same language, one in each semester.

Non-native English speakers

You will usually be expected to take the following module:

English for Language Professionals

This module will help you develop your English language skills with particular reference to:

  • lexis, structure and functions
  • receptive and productive skills
  • textual aspects
  • situational constraints, pragmatics and register
  • relevant cultural background
  • sources of information and guidance for the solution of difficulties related to applied concerns.
The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on Friday 30 April 2021.

Learning and assessment

How you will learn

We are preparing your tutorials, laboratory classes, workshops and seminars so that you can study and discuss your subjects with your tutors and fellow students in stimulating and enjoyable ways. While we will keep some elements of online course delivery, particularly while Covid-19 restrictions remain in place or where this enhances course delivery, teaching is being planned to take place in-person wherever possible. This will be subject to government guidance remaining unchanged.

We will use the best of digital technologies to support both your in-person and online teaching. We will provide live, interactive online sessions, alongside pre-recorded teaching materials so that you can work through them at your own pace. While the mix of in-person and digital teaching will vary by course, we aim to increase the proportion of in-person teaching in the spring term.

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Workshops
  • Tutorials
  • Supervision

Depending on modules, students are taught in a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops. Where relevant, students will use professional tools, translation software, and will work in our dedicated Translation and Interpreting suites.

How you will be assessed

All assessments in the 2021/22 academic year will be delivered online unless there is a professional accreditation requirement or a specific need for on-campus delivery and in-person invigilation.

  • Essay
  • In-class test
  • Dissertation
  • Presentation

Modules are normally assessed by coursework (Translating Texts, Audiovisual Translation, Introduction to Translation Theory), or by in-class exams (for Introduction to Interpreting and Translator’s Toolbox).

Students also have to complete a dissertation or a Targeted Translation Project.

Contact time and study hours

Students will have 6 to 8 contact hours every week during term time, and are expected to undertake independent study (in the form of reading, preparing for classes, writing assignments) for 25-30 hours/week.

Entry requirements

All candidates are considered on an individual basis and we accept a broad range of qualifications. The entrance requirements below apply to 2021 entry.

Undergraduate degree2:1 (or international equivalent) in an arts, humanities or social science subject

Applying

Our step-by-step guide covers everything you need to know about applying.

How to apply

Fees

Qualification MA
Home / UK £8,500
International £20,000

If you are a student from the EU, EEA or Switzerland starting your course in the 2021/22 academic year, you will pay international tuition fees.

This does not apply to Irish students, who will be charged tuition fees at the same rate as UK students. UK nationals living in the EU, EEA and Switzerland will also continue to be eligible for ‘home’ fee status at UK universities until 31 December 2027.

For further guidance, check our Brexit information for future students.

Additional costs

As a student on this course, we do not anticipate any extra significant costs, alongside your tuition fees and living expenses.

You should be able to access most of the books you’ll need through our libraries, though you may wish to purchase your own copies, which you would need to factor into your budget.

Funding

There are many ways to fund your postgraduate course, from scholarships to government loans.

We also offer a range of international masters scholarships for high-achieving international scholars who can put their Nottingham degree to great use in their careers.

Check our guide to find out more about funding your postgraduate degree.

Postgraduate funding

Careers

We offer individual careers support for all postgraduate students.

Expert staff can help you research career options and job vacancies, build your CV or résumé, develop your interview skills and meet employers.

More than 1,500 employers advertise graduate jobs and internships through our online vacancy service. We host regular careers fairs, including specialist fairs for different sectors.

Graduate destinations

Many of our postgraduates have taken up academic posts in higher education institutions in the UK and abroad. Others have embarked upon careers in curriculum design, interpreting and translation, publishing and research.

Career progression

78.4 % of postgraduates from the Faculty of Arts secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual salary was £23,045*

*HESA Graduate Outcomes 2020. The Graduate Outcomes % is derived using The Guardian University Guide methodology. The average annual salary is based on graduates working full-time within the UK.

Two masters graduates proudly holding their certificates
" Across the MA in Translation Studies, at the crossroads of languages and cultures, you will experiment with different genres, apply theory to your practice, reflect on the texts you are translating, whether these are literary or audiovisual, and grow as a translator and as a linguist. You will use professional tools in our state-of-the-art facilities to hone your skills and work alongside our staff who will share with you their experience as translators and help you create a network with industry professionals. "
Dr Pierre-Alexis Mével, Associate Professor in Translation Studies

Related courses

The University has been awarded Gold for outstanding teaching and learning (2017/18). Our teaching is of the highest quality found in the UK.

The Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) is a national grading system, introduced by the government in England. It assesses the quality of teaching at universities and how well they ensure excellent outcomes for their students in terms of graduate-level employment or further study.

This content was last updated on Friday 30 April 2021. Every effort has been made to ensure that this information is accurate, but changes are likely to occur given the interval between the date of publishing and course start date. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply.