Postgraduate study
This course focuses on environmental assessment, resource management, process engineering design and technology.
 
  
Qualification
MSc Environmental Engineering
Duration
1 year full-time
Entry requirements
2:1 (or international equivalent) in an engineering-related field
Other requirements
Applicants with a high 2:2 (or international equivalent) and substantial work experience may be considered
IELTS
6.0 (no less than 5.5 in any element)

If these grades are not met, English preparatory courses may be available
Start date
September
UK/EU fees
£7,785 - Terms apply
International fees
£22,815 - Terms apply
Accreditation
Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) and the IOM3 (Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining)
Campus
University Park Campus
 

 

Overview

MSc Environmental Engineering provides industries with highly employable graduates who will act as leaders and managers. The programme examines environmental problems like toxic waste, air pollution, waste disposal, energy efficiency, contaminated land and water and equips graduates with a high-level competency in process engineering design, environmental assessment, resource management and technological innovation.

The course offers to students with BEng, BSc or non-accredited engineering degrees the skills required to be eligible for Chartered Engineer status.

Course accreditation

IChemE accreditation logo    IOM3 accreditation logo

This course is accredited by the IChemE (Institution of Chemical engineers) and the IOM3 (Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining).

Key facts

  • Offering a unique combination of engineering skills, the department provides a strong and dynamic learning environment with close links between research and teaching
  • Relevance to industry is a strong feature of the department, with a high proportion of teaching staff being chartered engineers and/or having relevant industrial experience, as well as ongoing research links to industry
  • Your learning will be supported by academic staff with extensive experience, such as Professor Vince Pizzoni, who offers students advice and support on design projects
 

Full course details

The course follows a modular structure, with students completing 180 credits over a 12-month period. Students take 70 credits of core modules, 20 credits of optional modules, a 30-credit development project providing skills in advanced design practice, and a 60-credit summer project which develops skills in research.

You will develop:

  • important skills in harmonising the activities of industry and business with the protection and enhancement of the environment
  • the ability to evaluate the significance of environmental hazards, advise on treatment and containment, and develop the technologies and regulations that help prevent and contain accidents
  • a solid understanding of existing technologies, and an appreciation of the economic, legal, social and ethical aspects of the environmental challenges
  • skills in research, project management, problem solving and reporting, as well as exercising original thought
  • the ability to plan and undertake a research project

MSc Environmental Engineering is taught full-time over one year, commencing in September. Most applicants have an engineering first degree, and the most common include environmental and/or chemical engineering.

Academic English preparation and support

If you need additional support to take your language skills to the required level, you may be able to attend a presessional course at the Centre for English Language Education, which is accredited by the British Council for the teaching of English in the UK.

Students who successfully complete the presessional course to the required level can progress to postgraduate study without retaking IELTS or equivalent.

A specialist engineering course is available and you could be eligible for a joint offer, which means you will only need to apply for your visa once.

 
 

Modules

Module availability on non-compulsory modules is subject to timetabling, pre-requisite restrictions, and prior agreement with the respective Module Convenor.

Core modules

Individual Research Project (summer): 60 credits

Summary Of Content: This module is an individual research project conducted under the supervision of a member of the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering academic staff who is expert in the field. It enables a deeper study of a particular advanced aspect of chemical engineering covered earlier in the taught modules. It will develop the student's individual abilities to plan, analyse, criticise and report on a research study. The project may be a practically based laboratory or pilot plant study, a computer based study or a theoretical study.

 Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Tutorial   1 week 1 hour

Workload for the whole exercise will comprise a minimum of 12 hours of supervision (weekly meeting with supervisor) and 438 hours of study of literature on their topic, development and execution of research plan, and reporting on the work both orally and in a final thesis.

Method of Assessment: Dissertation 10-15,000 words - 100%.

The project area is flexible and will be supervised by an academic member of staff. MSc Students chose a theme from the following:

  • Energy Engineering 
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Sustainable Process Engineering
  • Biochemical Engineering

Projects are then allocated within these themes.

Previous research projects have included:

  • Heavy metals removal from drinking water
  • Microbial fuel cells
  • Carbon dioxide capture technologies
  • Removal of pharmaceuticals during wastewater treatment
  • Nanobots for contaminated land remediation
  • Design of a process for the clean-up and/or reclamation of contaminated sediment from the Birmingham Canal Navigation
 
Accelerated Design Training (year-long): 30 credits

Summary Of Content: Students undertaking this module will complete a group design project with a large individual component. The module is student-lead under the guidance of a group of academics.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Computing 20 weeks 1 week 1 hour
Workshop 20 weeks 1 week 3 hours
Workshop 20 weeks 1 week 3 hours

Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 40.00 A group conceptual design task consisting of: basis of design, a minimum of 3 PFDs for different process configurations and a 3 page report outlining the comparative performance of each configuration. Due in November.
Viva voce    
Coursework 2 60.00 Detailed group design task consisting of 10 separate components. Due in April.
 
Environmental Risk Assessment (autumn): 10 credits
Summary Of Content:
  • Risk assessment principles (source, pathway, receptor) including conceptual frameworks, Greenleaves III, risk based regulation and environmental protection.
  • Risk characterisation, hazard identification, consequences, significance, handling uncertainty.
  • Tools and techniques: Qualitative risk assessment; Quantitative risk assessment, ie hands-on risk assessment modelling.
  • Risk management .
  • Fate and transport of contaminants, speciation of contaminants, environmental partitioning (fugacity).
  • Health impact assessment: Public health, occupational health studies, toxicology, perception, exposure, causality, odds ratios, epidemiological studies, scientific evidence for landfill versus energy from waste (comparative assessment), odour. 

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Computing 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 1 hour

Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Report 70.00 Group Risk Assessment Report, 3000 words
Presentation 30.00 15 minute Individual Presentation
 
Water Treatment (autumn): 10 credits

Summary Of Content: This module introduces students to a range of knowledge and skills applicable to water and wastewater treatment. Students will gain an understanding in water availability, sources of pollution and the legislative framework for water quality from an EU perspective. Municipal water and wastewater treatment processes will be covered, focusing on key unit processes including sedimentation, filtration and disinfection. Example sheets and case studies on unit operations and processes will support the lecture delivery and provide an appreciation of the benefits of different plant specifications. The module will also be supported by 2 site visits.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Field 2 weeks 1 week 6 hours
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Tutorial 11 weeks 1 week 1 hour

The 2 site visits (fieldtrips) will replace 2 of the 2 hour lectures.

Method of Assessment: one 2-hour examination (100%).

 
Water Treatment Engineering (spring): 10 credits

Summary Of Content: This module will concentrate on water treatment technologies covering those applicable to both the treatment of wastewater and the treatment of water for potable (drinking water) use. The beginning of the module will review current practice and scientific principles in water treatment. Case Studies across the water industry will be utilised to demonstrate problems and potential solutions and gain an understanding of design considerations and operation of water treatment processes. Emerging issues in water treatment and the developing technologies to address these issues will be presented. Guest speakers from industry and 2 site visits will support the module delivery. 

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Field 2 weeks 1 week 6 hours
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Tutorial 12 weeks 1 week 1 hour

The 2 site visits (fieldtrips) will replace 2 of the scheduled 2 hour lecture sessions.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Individual report, Max 2,000 words
Exam 1 70.00 2 hour examination
 
Air Pollution 1 (autumn): 10 credits

Summary Of Content: The module delivers an overview of air pollution problems and range of techniques which are available for its control; sources and effects of air pollutants of major concern; and the development of air quality criteria. The behaviour of the atmosphere and the dispersion of air pollutants are studied.
Students are introduced to techniques of air pollution measurement and their use in the assessment of the effects that industrial activity may have. An overview of current EU and UK environmental legislation is provided, and the role of the assessment and control of air pollution in the planning application of existing and new industrial process is discussed. The duties of process managers, local authorities and the Environment Agency are discussed in light of the current and proposed legislation.
This module gives knowledge and understanding of air pollution problems, including a categorization of the types of natural and anthropogenic air pollution sources, sinks, and the effect.

 Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Tutorial 11 weeks 1 week 1 hour

This module to run concurrent with J1CAPC Air Pollution Control Technology.

Method of Assessment: one 2-hour exam - 100%.

 
Air Pollution 2 (spring): 10 credits
Summary Of Content: An Introduction to the selection and design of air pollution control processes.

- Topic 1: Control of Particulates

  • Cyclone design
  • Electrostatic Precipitator Design
  • Fabric Filter Design
  • Particulate Scrubbers

- Topic 2: Design of Auxiliary Equipment: including Hoods, Ducts, Fans and Coolers

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 1 hour
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Tutorial 12 weeks 1 week 1 hour

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 20.00 Individual Student Engineering Design Calculation Assessment Sheet
Project 1 80.00 Individual Student Particulate Process Control Design Project
 
Contaminated Land (spring): 10 credits

Summary Of Content: This module develops a risk based framework for the assessment of contaminated land based on the characterization and modeling of contaminant sources, pathways and receptors. Case studies are used to illustrate the application of this approach, the typical uncertainties and the management of risk. A range of physical, biological, chemical and thermal in-situ and ex-situ remediation technologies are covered. The application of these technologies is demonstrated by case studies including design studies.

 Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 1 hour
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Method of Assessment: 1 Coursework - Design Report (4,000 words) - 100%.

 
Research Planning (spring): 10 credits

Summary Of Content: The module develops the skills required to design, plan, implement and manage a research project. Students will be given instruction and practice in: problem definition; collection and synthesis of information from a range of traditional and electronic sources; critical review of information; definition of scope, aims and objectives; development of a project plan and schedule; management of project progress; reporting and presentation of outcomes. Particular emphasis of the module is towards quality control and quality assurance and how these underpin measurement activities. The use of statistics for the assessment of data quality in measurement is also emphasised. Students will also develop their writing and practical skills through exercises and coursework.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 1 hour
Practicum 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours

The module will comprise a series of lectures, tutorials and practicals. Students will undertake, under supervision, develop an appreciation and an ability plan and evaluate the requirements for a research project. Directed study to include the preparation of a research plan, individual presentation and a laboratory report.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 70.00 3,000 word Laboratory Report
Coursework 2 30.00 1,000 word Critical Review
 


For students with a first degree from the University of Nottingham, the programme may have to be adapted to ensure they do not study the same module twice in accordance with university regulations. These students should contact the department for clarification.

Optional modules

Students must choose 10 credits of modules for each semester from the following:

Power Generation and Carbon Capture (autumn): 10 credits
Summary Of Content: The following topics are covered: Fossil fuels, occurrence, use and world-wide availability; Fossil power generation, conventional and advanced technologies; Current environmental/climate change issues in Power Generation using Fossil Fuels: Emission problems and reduction technologies; climate-forcing carbon emissions and fossil energy de-carbonisation; Co-firing of fossil fuels and biomass; carbon (CO2) capture and storage (CCS).

Taught Semesters: Autumn UK 

Method and Frequency of Class: 

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 1 hour
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Method of Assessment: 

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Dissertation 30.00 Technology Assessment Report and Presentation
Exam 1 70.00 2 hour exam
 
Renewable Energy from Wastes
 
Process Risk Benefit and Analysis (spring): 10 credits

Summary Of Content: The module will explore decision making in the presence of uncertainty Risks of particular interest are those associated with large engineering projects such as the development of innovative new products and processes. The module will presents and interpret some of the frameworks helpful for balancing risks and benefits in situations that typically involve human safety, potential environmental effects, and large financial and technological uncertainties. Case studies will be used to illustrate key points and these will centre around the use and recovery of plastics, metals, industrial minerals and energy.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Tutorial 12 weeks 1 week 3 hours

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 20.00 8 page report
Coursework 2 20.00 10 minute presentation with Q and A
Coursework 3 30.00 25 page business plan
Coursework 4 15.00 10 minute presentation with Q and A
Coursework 5 15.00 3 page report
 
Energy Storage (spring): 10 credits
Summary Of Content: This module aims to provide Level 4 students with the fundamental knowledge and practical skills in relation with energy storage science, engineering and technology. It covers the following topics:
  • Fuels storage (coal, oil, natural gas, biomass, hydrogen etc)
  • Mechanical energy storage (springs, compressed air, fly wheels etc)
  • Heat or thermal energy storage (phase transformation, endothermic and exothermic reactions etc)
  • Electricity storage (electrochemical means, such as batteries, fuel cells, redox flow batteries, supercapacitors).
  • Integration of storage with supplier and users (power electronics for interfacing energy stores with power grid, renewable sources and users.
The module will be delivered in relation with the relevant materials and devices, together with optional laboratory observations and/or practices.

Taught Semesters: Spring UK 

Method and Frequency of Class: 

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Practicum 12 weeks 1 week 3 hours

Method of Assessment: 1 Examination (100%) -  2 hours

 
Fossil Energy Resources and Utilisation: Past, Present and Future (spring): 10 credits

Summary Of Content: The aim of the module is to provide the students with a thorough understanding of coal, oil and gas reserves, how they are utilised currently and how their use will be modified by CO2 mitigation in a global context. The module first entails introductory lectures on the subject which will define the initial individual directed reading tasks. After the outcomes of these have been assessed, the students will embark on a literature-based exercise on a specific topic that will be reviewed both in depth and critically. The topic will be defined by discussions with the module convenor.

Method and Frequency of Class: 

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 10 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Written exercise (1500 words) with an oral assessment by the convenor based on the introductory lectures and directed reading.
Coursework 2 70.00 A critical literature exercise on an aspect of the topic area.  The recommended length is 5000 words.  A short oral presentation on the review will also be given.
 

The above is a sample of the typical modules that we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Due to the passage of time between commencement of the course and subsequent years of the course, modules may change due to developments in the curriculum and information is provided for indicative purposes only.

 
 

Fees and funding

See information on how to fund your masters, including our step-by-step guide.

Please visit the faculty website for information on any scholarships currently available through the faculty.

Faculty of Engineering Postgraduate Scholarships

UK/EU students

The Graduate School website at the University of Nottingham provides more information on internal and external sources of postgraduate funding.

Please visit the faculty website for information on any scholarships currently available through the faculty.

Government loans for masters courses

The Government offers postgraduate student loans for students studying a taught or research masters course. Applicants must ordinarily live in England or the EU. Student loans are also available for students from Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland.

International and EU students

Masters scholarships are available for international students from a wide variety of countries and areas of study. You must already have an offer to study at Nottingham to apply. Please note closing dates to ensure your course application is submitted in good time.

Information and advice on funding your degree, living costs and working while you study is available on our website, as well as country-specific resources.

 
 

Careers and professional development

The growing recognition of the need for environmental protection has generated a high demand for good quality environmental engineers. The career options for environmental engineers align closely with those of chemical engineers, with specific roles and focus on environmental issues and aspects. This course equips students with skills suitable to a wide range of careers within UK and international companies and organisations, including, petrochemicals, foods, pollution protection, nanotechnology, academic research, consultancy, management and finance. 

This programme will also provide a strong foundation should you decide to continue your studies to PhD level and to pursue a research career.

Average starting salary and career progression

In 2017, 94.2% of postgraduates in the faculty who were available for employment had secured work or further study within six months of graduation. The average starting salary was £29,000 with the highest being £100,000.

* Known destinations of full-time home higher degree postgraduates, 2016/17. Salaries are calculated based on the median of those in full-time paid employment within the UK.

Career prospects and employability

The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers* and can offer you a head-start when it comes to your career.  

Those who take up a postgraduate research opportunity with us will not only receive support in terms of close contact with supervisors and specific training related to your area of research, you will also benefit from dedicated careers advice from our Careers and Employability Service.  

Our Careers and Employability Service offers a range of services including advice sessions, employer events, recruitment fairs and skills workshops – and once you have graduated, you will have access to the service for life.

* The Graduate Market 2013-2017, High Fliers Research

Boost your earning potential

Which university courses boost graduate wages the most? Studying with us could help you to earn more.

  • We are second highest in the UK for female engineering graduate earnings, five years after graduation
  • We are second highest in the Midlands for male engineering graduate earnings, five years after graduation

(Source: Institute for Fiscal Studies data: www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-44413086)

 
 
 

Disclaimer
This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.

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