School of Pharmacy
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Image of Aini Hamid

Aini Hamid

Assistant Professor,

Contact

  • workRoom B1A08 Faculty of Science
    Malaysia Campus
    Jalan Broga
    43500 Semenyih
    Selangor Darul Ehsan
    Malaysia
  • work+6 (03) 8924 8732
  • fax+6 (03) 8924 8018

Research Summary

Aini is currently working on cross-disciplinary projects that will extract and deploy truly innovative, but mature models from across industry sectors to address some of the health challenges… read more

Current Research

Aini is currently working on cross-disciplinary projects that will extract and deploy truly innovative, but mature models from across industry sectors to address some of the health challenges specifically in resource deprived settings. The projected 388 million people dying of non-communicable diseases by 2015, and with the majority speculated to occur in the most productive age groups and 80% of the deaths taking place in low and middle income countries (LMICs), the limited capacity of LMICs to respond adequately adds to this colossal challenge. However, in the presence of timely and innovative interventions, better health levels will improve human capital and free much needed resources for continued economic growth, and as such, reduce proliferation down the spiral of ill health and poverty.

Past Research

As a molecular and structural biologist, Aini investigated proteins implicated in arrhythmia and heart failure during her appointment at the University of Manchester's Medical School. Previous to that, she worked on proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases while based at the MRC-Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge.

Future Research

In addition to her current work on innovation in healthcare, she is keen on exploring traditional plants for diabetes management . Of particular interest is the drumstick plant, Moringa Oleifera. Originally native to India, the leaves of the plant have been consumed to treat and manage the symptoms of diabetes for years in many developing countries such as Malaysia and Africa. Scientific based investigations have just started to corroborate these anecdotal claims, whereby a certain polyphenol found in this plant have shown ameliorating effect in diabetes induced rats.

School of Pharmacy

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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