School of Pharmacy
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Bruna De Falco

Research Fellow, Faculty of Science

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Biography

Dr. Bruna de Falco is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at School of Pharmacy in mass spectrometry-based metabolic flux analysis of metabolic pathways for the Green Chemicals Beacon of Excellence (BoE) within the Centre for Analytical Bioscience (CAB). Prior to this position she was a Post-doctoral Research Assistant at Abertay University (Dundee, Scotland) modeling the pathways of toxicant formation in emissions from heated vaporized nicotine delivery devices. She obtained her PhD in Metabolomic Fingerprinting of Food Plants by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry at Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II (Italy).

Expertise Summary

Extraction, purification and elucidation of primary and secondary metabolites from natural products (e.g. marine sponges, plants, yeasts).

Isolation and purification by using chromatographic techniques (e.g. TLC, UHPLC).

Compound identification by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

Metabolomic analysis based on NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry techniques.

Ultrasounds assisted extraction, antioxidant activity, total phenol content, antibacterial and anti-fungal activity of plant extracts.

Research Summary

Dr. Bruna de Falco is involved in mass spectrometry-based metabolic flux analysis and computational modelling of metabolic pathways project for the Green Chemicals Beacon of Excellence (BoE) within… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Dr. Bruna de Falco is involved in mass spectrometry-based metabolic flux analysis and computational modelling of metabolic pathways project for the Green Chemicals Beacon of Excellence (BoE) within the Centre for Analytical Bioscience (CAB) facility, School of Pharmacy. She is performing experimental design for mass spectrometry-based flux analysis and data collection, and integration of fluxomics data with metabolic pathway and data visualisation methods. The main area of application is in bacterial metabolic engineering and use of stable isotope assisted metabolomics/fluxomics methods to generate mathematical models of metabolic flux.

School of Pharmacy

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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