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Sally Eldeghaidy

Beacon Anne Mclaren Fellow, Faculty of Science

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Biography

I am an MR physicist, graduated in Physics at Suez Canal University, Egypt. In 2009, I obtained my PhD at the Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre (SPMIC) in a multi-disciplinary project bridging MR Imaging techniques with food sciences. Following my PhD I worked as an Assistant Professor of Physics in Egypt for four years. In 2014, I rejoined the SPMIC to investigate how different tastes are represented in the primary gustatory cortex "gustotopic mapping", using high resolution fMRI at ultra-high field (7T). In 2018, I was awarded the Anne McLaren fellowship with the Future Food Beacon of Excellence to develop an understanding of mouth-brain-gut interactions to tackle obesity, using novel MR imaging techniques to combine brain and gut imaging in a single MRI scan session.

My research expertise is in imaging the human brain, using optimised MR imaging techniques, and developing analysis methods to understand the physiological mechanism involved in food intake, food choice and consumption. This includes functional MRI to study the brain's perception to taste, aroma, flavour and oral fat emulsions; the physiological mechanism involved in satiation through brain-gut interactions; and the effect of taste phenotype and genotype on food perception, preference and choice. This also extended to explore taste representation in the primary taste cortex and how this differ with individual variation in taste phenotype and genotype (PROP and thermal taste status).

Teaching Summary

I teach how food affects the brain on the undergraduate Food and Physiology course [D211F5 UK] at the School of Biosciences. I supervise 3rd year Physics and Food Science undergraduate research… read more

Research Summary

My current research includes:

Developing novel MR imaging techniques to combine brain and gut imaging in a single MRI scan session to understand the physiological mechanism (brain-gut axis) of appetite and satiety in normal weight and obese participants, and the association of taste phenotypes (PROP, thermal taste status, and fat liking status) with BMI.

I am also investigating the brain-gut interactions in Crohn's disease patients in collaboration with Dr. Gordon Moran at the Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre (NDDC), School of Medicine, University of Nottingham.

Investigating how different tastes are represented in the primary gustatory cortex "gustotopic mapping" using high resolution fMRI at ultra high field (7T). This also extends to understand how gustotopic maps differ with individual variation in taste phenotype and genotype (PROP and thermal taste). I am also investigating the brain's response to phantom taste which is elicited in some individuals "thermal tasters" when their tongue is thermally stimulated. For further details please visit the website: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/biosciences/research/research-themes/taste-map/taste-map.aspx.

Selected Publications

I teach how food affects the brain on the undergraduate Food and Physiology course [D211F5 UK] at the School of Biosciences. I supervise 3rd year Physics and Food Science undergraduate research projects.

As postdoctoral research fellow at the SPMIC, I assisted PhD students on brain imaging projects in collaboration between SPMIC and food sciences and Nottingham Digestive Disease- Biomedical Research Centre (NDD-BRC).

During my role as Assistant Professor at Suez Canal University, Egypt, I lectured undergraduate physics modules including medical physics, health physics, environmental physics, waves, and atomic physics. I was the course coordinator for the medical physics module. I supervised three master multi-disciplinary (Physics-Biology) students and one PhD physics student.

School of Physics and Astronomy

The University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RD

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