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Patrick Bointon

PhD Student, Faculty of Engineering

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Biography

Patrick studied Mechanical Engineering at the University of Nottingham, graduating in 2014 with a Masters with industrial placement award, having worked for Infineum UK Ltd to include a year in industry with his studies. Having graduated, Patrick worked for a year as a mechanical design engineer at Industrial Automation (part of the TEW group), before returning to the University of Nottingham in 2015 to work on his PhD under Prof Richard Leach and the centre for Doctoral training in Ultra Precision, focusing on the development of non-contact methods for measuring the outside geometry of AM parts.

Teaching Summary

MM1DM1 - Creo Demonstrator

MM1PRO

Research Summary

Metrology is an important tool for manufacturing as it provides the necessary feedback for process control and post-process troubleshooting. Without fast and accurate metrology, setting up production… read more

Current Research

Metrology is an important tool for manufacturing as it provides the necessary feedback for process control and post-process troubleshooting. Without fast and accurate metrology, setting up production procedures and maintaining production tolerances to minimise scrap parts is not possible. Metrology is especially important in the field of additive manufacturing (AM), where, in order to scale up production, multiple machines are used on the same manufacturing floor. Each machine can be considered as being an independent manufacturing process or manufacturing line that needs process feedback in order to achieve tight tolerances on the products being manufactured and allow comparability between machines. In order to further the metrology measurement field and aid the continued progression of AM, a new and more flexible system needs to be developed, as current measurement systems have limitations such as: lack of flexibility; struggle to cope with high slope angles, surface reflectivity problems and time of measurement vs performance/accuracy trade-off. Based on current research trends and recent publications, optical methods (Coded Structured Light, CSL) show considerable promise and so the aim of the PhD will be to develop and utilise CSL techniques in a new system for measuring the complex geometries on additive manufactured parts. This will require optical instrument R&D and an investigation of existing commercial measurement systems currently in use. Comparisons with contact techniques will be carried out. The new system will be aimed at being capable of measurement volumes of a cube of up to 750 mm sides to accuracies approaching 5 ┬Ám.

Advanced Manufacturing Technology Research Group

The University of Nottingham
Faculty of Engineering
The University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD



email:AdvManufacturing@nottingham.ac.uk