Cells, Organisms and Molecular Genetics
  • Print

Our research team

The Cells, Organisms and Molecular Genetics team here at the University of Nottingham’s School of Life Sciences is a diverse, collaborative group of researchers. We’re academics, postdoctoral research fellows, research technicians and postgraduate students, all working together to break new ground and make a real impact on the world around us.

Image of Mark Ravinet

Mark Ravinet

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

Contact

Biography

BSc Physical Geography, University College London (2007); MSc Freshwater and Coastal Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London (2008); PhD Queen's University Belfast (2012).

JSPS Postdoctoral Fellow, National Institute of Genetics, Japan (2012); Postdoctoral Researcher, Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden (2013); JSPS Postdoctoral Fellow, National Institute of Genetics, Japan (2014-2015); Researcher, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, University of Oslo, Norway (2015-2018); Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellow, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, University of Oslo, Norway (2018-2019); Assistant Professor, University of Nottingham, UK (2019-present).

Expertise Summary

Population genetics

Genomics of adaptation and speciation

Bioinformatics

Research Summary

Our research uses genomic, phenotypic and ecological approaches to understand speciation, adaptation and evolution. We are interested in the role that gene flow and hybridization plays in these… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

Our research uses genomic, phenotypic and ecological approaches to understand speciation, adaptation and evolution. We are interested in the role that gene flow and hybridization plays in these processes. Why is it that in some contexts introgression between species is detrimental and cause the collapse of species boundaries, when in others it can be a creative force, providing the genetic and phenotypic variation required for adaptation and in some cases, speciation?

We also study the evolution of human commensalism. Human impact has altered the evolutionary trajectory of a huge number of species. Some species are able to survive and even thrive in human-altered niches. How does such human-dependency evolve? What are the genomic underpinnings underlying adaptation to a human-transformed world? We study Passer sparrows, particularly the house sparrow, to address these questions.

Cells, Organisms and Molecular Genetics

School of Life Sciences
University of Nottingham
Medical School
Queen's Medical Centre
Nottingham NG7 2UH