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Centre Members

Co-directors

Jan Meyer-Sahling

Jan Meyer-Sahling, School of Politics and International Relations

Professor of Political Science

Professor Jan-Hinrik Meyer-Sahling holds a PhD in Politics from LSE. In September 2004 he joined the University of Nottingham where he is a Professor.

Previously, he was a Tutorial Fellow in Comparative Public Administration and Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Lecturer in European Politics at Birkbeck College, London. In 2013-2014, Jan-Hinrik was a Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence.

His recent research has centred on topics related to civil service reform in Central and Eastern Europe and the Western Balkans, problems of corruption in post-communist Europe, the Europeanisation of national political systems in Europe East and West, and the institutionalisation of political time in Europe.

Jan-Hinrik’s research has been published in the European Journal of Political Research, Journal of European Public Policy, Public Administration, International Review of Administrative Sciences, Governance, West European Politics, East European Politics and Public Administration and Development.

 

Cecilia Testa

Cecilia Testa, School of Economics / School of Politics and International Relations

Professor of Political Economy

Professor Cecilia Testa earned a PhD in Economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science. In 2014 she joined from Royal Holloway University of London as a Professor the University of Nottingham, where she holds a joint Chair of Political Economy with the School of Economics and the School of Politics and International Relations.

She previously lectured also at Erasmus University (Rotterdam), the London School of Economics, and the University of Essex. She held visiting positions at MIT, the Australian National University and the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign.

Cecilia’s research interests lie in the area of political economy, with a focus on comparative institutions, special interest politics, corruption, distributive politics and migration policy. Her work has been published in journals like the British Journal of Political Science, the European Economic Review, the Journal of the European Economic Association and the Journal of Politics.

 

Research themes directors

Abigail Barr

Abigail Barr, School of Economics

Professor of Economics

Professor Abigail Barr holds a DPhil in Economics from the University of Oxford. In 2011 she joined the University of Nottingham. Before coming to Nottingham, she was a researcher at the Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE) and the Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. She is an associate of the Nuffield Centre for Experimental Social Science, Oxford, and the Institute of Fiscal Studies.

Her research focuses on the socially embedded decision-maker. Four themes have dominated her work to date: the role of other-regarding preferences in individual decision-making; how people set up and hold each other to mutually beneficial agreements; citizens’ willingness and ability to hold public service providers to account; and the factors and mechanisms determining individual preferences and values.

Her work has been published in Science, the Economic Journal, the American Journal of Economics: Applied Economics, the Journal of the European Economic Association, the Journal of Experimental Political Science, and the Journal of Public Economics and several other peer reviewed journals.

Her ongoing research projects include “International anti-corruption laws and local social norms: Interactions and implications for policy” and “Financial decision-making, gender and social norms”.

 

Don Lee

Don Lee, School of Politics and International Relations

Assistant Professor

Dr Don Lee received a PhD in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego in 2015. Before joining the University of Nottingham in 2017, he held a position in the Graduate School of Public Administration at Seoul National University.

His research interests include the political economy of institutions, comparative public management, and experimental research. His research has been published in Comparative Political Studies, Governance, Oxford Handbook, Regulation and Governance, and among others.

 

Scott Moser

Scott Moser, School of Politics and International Relations

Associate Professor in Politics

Dr Scott Moser received a PhD in Political Economy in 2007 from Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Social and Decision Sciences after earning a BA in mathematics/economics from New College of the University of South Florida in 2001.

Prior to arriving in Nottingham, he has held positions in the department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin, as an assistant professor and Nuffield College, University of Oxford, as a Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow (2007-2010).

His research interests can be described broadly as applied social choice, and specifically involve game theory, voting theory, collective choice (especially from tournaments), legislative institutions, and statistical modeling (especially latent class models of text and non-parametric Bayesian inference). Pursuing these research interests involves development and testing of theories of collective decision making.

 

DJ Seidmann

D J Seidmann, School of Economics

Professor of Economic Theory

Professor Daniel Seidmann holds a PhD in Economics from the LSE. He has been Professor of Economics at Nottingham since 2003, having previously been employed by LSE, Trinity College Dublin, and Newcastle University.

Daniel’s research uses game-theoretic methods to study bilateral and multilateral negotiations and strategic information transmission. He has applied his results on bargaining to explore the process of government formation and the effects of varying the quota or the deadline on agreed outcomes. He has applied his research on communication to study the effects of a right to silence, and to consider how the order of presenting evidence affects trial outcomes.

His research has been published in leading journals such as Econometrica, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economic Studies and Journal of Economic Theory.

 

Centre members

Facundo Albornoz

Facundo Albornoz, School of Economics

Professor of Economics and Head of School (Economics)

Facundo Albornoz holds a PhD in Economics from the EHESS/Paris School of Economics. He joined the University of Nottingham in 2015, where he is currently an Professor and Head of School.

Before coming to Nottingham he held academic positions at the University of Birmingham and the Universidad de San Andrés in Argentina. He is a Research Fellow of the Argentine National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET), the Leverhulme Centre for Research on Globalisation and Economic Policy (GEP) and the Nottingham Interdisciplinary Centre for Economic and Political Research (NICEP).

Facundo works in a variety of research areas such as international trade (firm export dynamics), education policy (behavioural interactions within the school system), cultural dynamics and international political economics (the effect of foreign interventions on conflict and democracy), with an underlying common interest in development economics.

He has published in academic journals such as the Journal of International Economics, Journal of Development Economics and Journal of the European Economic Association. His research has been funded by the ESRC and the British Academy, and he has undertaken advisory work for agencies such as the World Bank, IADB and the OEI.

 

Roberto Bonfatti

Roberto Bonfatti, School of Economics

Assistant Professor

Dr Roberto Bonfatti holds a PhD in Economics from the London School of Economics. He is Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Padua and holds a part-time position in the School of Economics at Nottingham.   

His research lies at the intersection of international trade, political economy, and economic history. Among his topics of interest are the relation between trade and the rise and fall of colonial empires; trade and war; the economic legacy of empires, particularly in terms of the international specialization of former colonies; and the political economy of the natural resource trade. His research has been published in the Journal of International Economics.

 

Fernando Casal Bertoa

Fernando Casal Bértoa, School of Politics and International Relations

Associate Professor

Dr Fernando Casal Bértoa holds a PhD in Social and Political Science from the European University Institute. He is an Associate Professor at the University of Nottingham and was previously a Nottingham Research Fellow and a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Leiden.

Fernando is currently working on a large-scale research project on The Institutionalization of European Party Systems since 1848 (whogoverns.eu). He is interested in issues related to political parties and party systems, especially in new “Third Wave” democracies or micro-states.

He is also part of Professor Ingrid van Biezen’s team working on the “Legal Regulation of Political Parties in Post-war Europe” (funded by the European Research Council – ERC) and OSCE/ODHIR expert on party regulation. His work has been published in journals such as Party Politics and the International Political Science Review among others.

 

Gianni de Fraja

Gianni De Fraja, School of Economics

Professor of Economics

Professor Gianni de Fraja is Professor of Economics at the University of Nottingham, and a fellow of CEPR. He has a DPhil from Oxford, and has previously held Chairs in York and Leicester and visiting posts in Tokyo, Bonn, Barcelona, and Rome.

He has written around 60 papers in leading international academic journals, including the Review of Economic Studies, the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Economic Journal and the Journal of Public Economics.

His policy oriented research has centred on theoretical aspects of competition among state owned and private firms, on the regulation of utilities, and on the design of health policies. His recent current focus is on economics aspect of education policies.

 

Giovanni Facchini

Giovanni Facchini, School of Economics

Professor of Economics

Professor Giovanni Facchini holds a PhD in Economics from Stanford University. He joined the School of Economics at Nottingham in 2012 from Erasmus University in Rotterdam, where he also held a Chair in Economics. He is a Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) in London, a Research Fellow at the CES-Ifo institute in Munich, at IZA in Bonn, an External Fellow at CReAM and the coordinator of the International Migration Program at the Centro Studi Luca d’Agliano in Turin.

His recent research focuses on the processes through which immigration policies are shaped. He has also worked on the income distribution effects of economic reforms and on the formation of preferential trading arrangements.

His papers have been published in journals like the American Economic Journal, the Journal of the European Economic Association, the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Journal of International Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, among others. Giovanni’s scholarly activities have been supported by grants from the NORFACE consortium, the European Union and the World Bank.

 

David Gill

David Gill, School of Politics and International Relations

Professor

David James Gill is a Professor in the School of Politics and International Relations. His research interests include strategic studies and economic history. David’s work appears in the Economic History Review, Foreign Affairs, Journal of Cold War Studies, International Affairs, and the Journal of Strategic Studies.

He has published two books, Britain and the Bomb (Stanford University Press) and Divided Allies (Cornell University Press).

 

Paul Heywood

Paul M Heywood, School of Politics and International Relations

Sir Francis Hill Professor of European Politics

Professor Paul Heywood graduated with an MA in Politics (First Class) from the University of Edinburgh, and did postgraduate studies in Madrid and at the LSE, from where he received his MSc (Econ) and PhD (Politics). Before joining Nottingham, he taught at the University of Glasgow and at the University of London. He also worked for the Economist Intelligence Unit, London (1989-93).

Professor Heywood is author, co-author or editor of 14 books and more than 80 journal articles and book chapters. His research focuses on political corruption, institutional design and state capacity in contemporary Europe.

Current funded research includes an ESRC/Hong Kong project on Integrity Management in the UK, HK and China, and an EU FP7 project, ANTICORRP, on anti-corruption policies. He is also currently the UK Local Research Correspondent on Corruption (2012-14) for the European Commission’s DG Home Affairs.

 

Nicole Janz

Nicole Janz, School of Politics and International Relations

Assistant Professor

Gaining a PhD in politics and international studies from the University of Cambridge, Nicole taught statistical methods for social scientists there too.

In her research, she examines the effects of foreign direct investment on repression and labour rights; how expropriation hinders human rights; judicial delays, impunity and corruption; and how human rights shaming influences foreign investors.

Nicole is an advocate for research transparency, serving as an ambassador for the Center for Open Science and co-founding the Political Science Replication Initiative. She blogs at https://politicalsciencereplication.wordpress.com

 

Maria Montero

Maria Montero, School of Economics

Professor of Economics

Maria Montero joined the University of Nottingham in 2002 after earning a PhD in Economics from Tilburg University, and is currently Professor of Economics. Maria was a Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Dortmund from 2000 to 2002, and an IKERBASQUE Visiting Professor at UPV/EHU from 2013 to 2014.

Her research focuses on voting and legislative bargaining using game-theoretic models and laboratory experiments. Specifically, she has investigated questions such as the effect of the enlargement of a voting body on the balance of power between its members, the performance of different decision rules in committees and the trade-off between efficiency and fairness.

Her work has been published in academic journals such as the Journal of the European Economic Association, Economic Journal, Games and Economic Behavior and American Political Science Review.

 

Atsuyoshi Morozumi

Atsuyoshi Morozumi, School of Economics

Assistant Professor

Dr Atsuyoshi Morozumi joined the University of Nottingham in September 2009.

His general research interests are macroeconomics and fiscal policy. Specifically, he studies how different components of public spending and revenue may have different macroeconomic effects, in the contexts of both business cycles and growth/development. He also works on the electoral effects on the composition of public spending and revenue.

 

Mikhail Poyker

Michael Poyker, School of Economics

Assistant Professor

I am an Assistant Professor of Economics at the School of Economics, University of Nottingham. I received my Ph.D. in Management from the University of California, Los Angeles, Anderson School of Management in 2018, and worked as a post-doctoral fellow at Columbia University, Graduate School of Business from 2018 to 2020. My research interests focus primarily on cultural norms and social justice. Research areas: Applied Microeconomics, Political Economy, and Development.

 

Joanna Rickne

Joanna Rickne, School of Economics

Professor

Johanna Rickne is a Professor in Economics at the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University and part-time Professor in the School of Economics. She has previously worked at SIPA, Columbia University and held visiting positions at Berkeley, Yale and Harvard.

Her current research is in labour economics, political economics, and gender economics. Previously she has worked extensively on the Chinese economy.

 

Valeria Rueda

Valeria Rueda, School of Economics

Assistant Professor

Valeria Rueda joined the School of Economics in 2019. She received a PhD in Economics from Sciences Po, Paris in 2016. After that, she was a Career Development Fellow at the University of Oxford (Pembroke College), where she was associated with the Economic and Social History Research Group.

Her research investigates historical determinants of spatial inequalities of economic outcomes, health, and political participation. She has devoted significant attention to the role of culture in shaping persistent development patterns.

 

Dario Tortarolo

Dario Tortarolo, School of Economics

Assistant Professor

Dario Tortarolo holds a PhD in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the University of Nottingham in 2020, where he is currently Assistant Professor of Economics. For the academic year 2020-21 he will a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at the Institute for Fiscal Studies. Dario is originally from Argentina where he earned a B.S. and M.A. in Economics at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP).

His fields of interest are Public Finance and Labor Economics, and his current research mainly focuses on behavioral responses of workers and businesses to tax and transfer policies, with a special interest in developing countries. Some of his current work studies inter-temporal labor supply responses of high-wage earners to income taxation; the wage effects of means-tested transfers that are disbursed by employers; and in a set of projects he explores tax evasion of firms and self-employed workers and assesses the role of tax preparers in mediating those responses.

 

Simon Toubeau

Simon Toubeau, School of Politics and International Relations

Assistant Professor in Politics and International Relations

Dr Simon Toubeau holds a PhD in Social and Political Science from the European University Institute and an MPhil in European Politics from Oxford. He joined the University of Nottingham in 2015 as an Assistant Professor. He has previously been a Research Fellow at University of Edinburgh and the Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

His research interests lie in the areas of comparative European politics, regionalism and federalism. He is the author of several book chapters and articles published in journals such as the European Journal of Political Economy and the British Journal of Political Science.

 

Cees van der Eijk

Cees van der Eijk, School of Politics and International Relations

Professor of Social Science Research Methods and Director of Methods and Data Institute

Professor Cees van der Eijk holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Amsterdam. Since 2004 he has been Professor of Social Science Research Methods at Nottingham; previously he was Professor of Political Science at the University of Amsterdam.

His research focusses on research methods and on comparative politics (in particular the interrelationships between voters, parties/political entrepreneurs, and media). His work has been published in numerous articles and books from leading publishers such as Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press and the University of Michigan Press.

He has been Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator on a large number of election studies, including the Dutch National Election Studies, the European Election Studies, and the British Election Study. He currently leads a work-package on data communities in the Horizon2020 project Social Sciences and Humanities Open Cloud (SSHOC).

 

Annemarie Walter

Annemarie Walter, School of Politics and International Relations

Assistant Professor

Dr Annemarie Walter is an Assistant Professor in the School of Politics and International Relations at the University of Nottingham. Previously she was Assistant Professor in Political Communication at the Department of Communication Science of VU University Amsterdam She graduated in political science at Leiden University and received her PhD in 2012 at Amsterdam University (UVA).

She is working on her research project “CSNCC”: Comparative Study of Negative Campaigning and its Consequences. Her broad areas of research interests include election campaigns, political communication, political parties and party systems, party strategy and electoral behaviour.

 

 

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telephone: +44 (0)115 84 68135
email: nicep@nottingham.ac.uk