NTEC
Nottingham Transportation Engineering Centre
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Design and Performance

Designing materials, prototypes, laboratory tests and frameworks to ensure long-lasting performance of transport infrastructure

 

Materials and Technology 

Modified bitumen for roofing membranes
  • Funder: Technology Strategy Board, - Knowledge Transfer Partneship, UK
  • Total value: £147.000
  • Start to end date: 2013 - 2015

Summary:

The KTP Chesterfelt Project is funded by the Technology Strategy Board and Chesterfelt Group, for the development of bituminous binders for use in roof membran manufacture.Chesterfelt’s strategic goal is to secure manufacturing and production of high quality bituminous roofing systems and membranes through new, alternative materials. 

NTEC Members:   Gordon Airey and Davide Lo Presti

Project partners:  ​Chesterfelt Ltd

​Key publications:  

Subhy A., Lo Presti D., Airey G., “ Rubberised bitumen manufacturing assisted by rheological measurements” - Road Materials and Pavement Design, Taylor&Francis, September 2015

 
Rheology of complex fluids - (UoN HERMES Fellowship)
  • Funder: received by University of Nottingham, UK, through EU funding
  • Total value: £20,000
  • Start to end date: 2014 - 2015

Summary:

The mixing performance of complex fluids are compared against those obtained with a standard impeller spindle, to establish which geometry allowed reaching the best level of homogenisation and the more realistic viscosity measurements. 

The HRI is calibrated and then used for testing several materials in the field of pavement engineering. The whole experimental programme is simulated by means of CFD analyses.

At last a comparison between CFD particles volume fraction and experimental tests will be carried out to validate CFD simulations and to asses whether CFD modelling could represent a valid support to optimise design and manufacturing efforts of non-standard equipment for rheometry of complex fluids.

NTEC Members:  Davide Lo Presti and Dave Hargreaves 

Key publications:  D. Lo Presti, G. Giancontieri, D.M. Hargreaves, Improving the rheometry of rubberized bitumen: experimental and computation fluid dynamics studies, Construction and Building Materials, Volume 136, 1 April 2017, Pages 286-297, ISSN 0950-0618,  

 
SUP&R ITN
  • Funder: EU FP7 MC-ITN - Networks for Initial Training (ITN)
  • Total value: €4,066,597
  • Start to end date: 2013 - 2017

Summary:

The Sustainable Pavements & Railways Initial Training Network is a training-through-research programme that is empowering Europe by forming a new generation of multi-disciplinary professionals capable of conceiving, planning and executing sustainable road and railway infrastructures. The University of Nottingham lead the effort which is the first of its kind and involves 29 partners between universities, research centres and companies/industries, from five EU countries (UK, Italy, France, Ireland and Spain) and the USA.

NTEC Members:   Davide Lo PrestiGordon Airey,  Nick Thom, and Tony Parry

Project Beneficaries: University of Nottingham, IFSTTAR, University of Palermo, University of Granada, AECOM, University College Dublin, Universidad de Huelva, IrishRail, Sacyr Vallehermoso and Repsol

Key publications:  

Barco Carrión, A.J.D., Lo Presti, D., Pouget, S., Airey, G., Chailleux, E. Linear viscoelastic properties of high reclaimed asphalt content mixes with biobinders (2017) Road Materials and Pavement Design, 18, pp. 241-251. 

D’Angelo Giacomo, Nicholas Thom, Lo Presti Davide. Bitumen stabilised ballast: A potential solution for railway track-bed. Construction and Building Materials 124(2016):118-126 

James Bryce, Stefanie Brodie, Tony Parry, Davide Lo Presti, A systematic assessment of road pavement sustainability through a review of rating tools, Resources, Conservation and Recycling, Available online 19 December 2016, ISSN 0921-3449, 

 

Existing and Future Infrastructure

MORPHINE (Re-designing the coast: The Morphodynamics of Large Bodies of Sediment in a Macro-tidal Environment)  

Funder: EPSRC

Dates: April 2016-April 2020.

Value: £395,333

Partners: University of Swansea.

Summary:

We are developing a mathematical description of morphodynamics as it pertains to a macro-tidal environment (coastal region with large tidal range, like that in the UK), so as to understand the movement of large deposits of sand on our beaches and shorefaces (shorefaces are, loosely, the regions in between the beach and the continental shelf floor). 

This theory will allow us to formulate a new mathematical modelling approach. These models will allow us to develop a new approach to designing sea defences, in which large quantities of sand ("nourishments") are deposited at strategic locations at and / or near to the coastline. These nourishments will provide a source of sediment for beaches that are eroding, but, importantly, they will also alter local wave and current conditions, which will transform previously eroding beaches into more stable configurations, and so form naturalistic coastal defences. 

Theory and models, coupled with a new, realistic statistical model of sea conditions, will make it possible for us to predict the behaviour of these nourishments to a reasonable degree of accuracy under different conditions, and with good efficiency. This will support the design sea defences that do not have to rely on invasive, expensive and reactive traditional sea defences. 

The work addresses UK conditions in particular, in which a very large tidal range combines with a wide variety of wave conditions to produce a particularly challenging environment. We are therefore proposing to undertake fundamental work on coastal morphodynamics so as to develop tools that will let us re-think our coastal defence strategy.

Members: Prof Nicholas Dodd and Dr Wenlong Chen

Publications: 

Chen, W. L., Dodd, N., Tiessen, M. C. H. and Calvete, D. (2018). An idealised study for the long term evolution of crescentic bars: Continental Shelf Research, Continental Shelf Research, 152, 87-97.

Chen, W.L., Dodd, N. and Tiessen, M.C.H. (2017). An idealised study of the stabilisation mechanism in the long-term evolution of crescentic bars. Proc. Coastal Dynamics, Paper No. 049, Denmark. 

 
SUP&R ITN
      • Funder: EU FP7 MC-ITN - Networks for Initial Training (ITN)
      • Total value: €4,066,597
      • Start to end date: 2013 - 2017

Summary:

The Sustainable Pavements & Railways Initial Training Network is a training-through-research programme that is empowering Europe by forming a new generation of multi-disciplinary professionals capable of conceiving, planning and executing sustainable road and railway infrastructures. The University of Nottingham lead the effort which is the first of its kind and involves 29 partners between universities, research centres and companies/industries, from five EU countries (UK, Italy, France, Ireland and Spain) and the USA.

NTEC MembersDavide Lo PrestiGordon Airey,  Nick Thom, and  Tony Parry

Project Beneficaries: University of Nottingham, IFSTTAR, University of Palermo, University of Granada, AECOM, University College Dublin, Universidad de Huelva, IrishRail, Sacyr Vallehermoso and Repsol

Key publications:  

Barco Carrión, A.J.D., Lo Presti, D., Pouget, S., Airey, G., Chailleux, E.  Linear viscoelastic properties of high reclaimed asphalt content mixes with biobinders (2017) Road Materials and Pavement Design, 18, pp. 241-251. 

D’Angelo Giacomo, Nicholas Thom, Lo Presti Davide.  Bitumen stabilised ballast: A potential solution for railway track-bed. Construction and Building Materials 124(2016):118-126 

James Bryce, Stefanie Brodie, Tony Parry, Davide Lo Presti,  A systematic assessment of road pavement sustainability through a review of rating tools, Resources, Conservation and Recycling, Available online 19 December 2016, ISSN 0921-3449.

 
Splash and Spray Assessment Tool
  • Funder: US Federal Highway Administration
  • Total value: £300,000
  • Start to end date: 2008 – 2012

Summary:

The development of a splash and spray prediction model in this project provides a tool for highway engineers, contributing to decisions concerning the type and priority of maintenance on their network. This could deliver a range of benefits, including increased user satisfaction with the network, reduced accidents and a reduction in the detrimental effects of pollutants being deposited on the verges and street furniture.

NTEC Members: 

Tony Parry and Dave Hargreaves 

Project partners:  ​Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (USA), Virginia Transportation Research Council (USA) and TRL Ltd (UK)

​Key publications:Flintsch, G.W., Tang, L., Katicha, S.W., de Leon, E., Viner, H., Dunford, A., Nesnas, K., Coyle, F., Sanders, P., Gibbons, R., Williams, B., Hargreaves D., Parry, T., McGhee, K., Larson, R.M., and Smith K. Splash and Spray Assessment Tool Development Program, Final Report, DTFH61-08-C-00030, 2014. 

 

 

 

 

 

NTEC

Faculty of Engineering
The University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD



email:ntec@nottingham.ac.uk