Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre
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Seminar : Zelekha Seedat - Detection of Transient Spectral Bursts and their Role in Functional Connectivity and George Hutchinson - Haemodynamics of the human placenta

 
Location
SPMIC UP Seminar Room, University Park
Date(s)
Thursday 28th November 2019 (13:00-14:00)
Description

 SPMIC Seminar

Speakers : Zelekha Seedat and George Hutchinson, SPMIC- University Park, University of Nottingham

Title : Zelekha- Detection of Transient Spectral Bursts and their Role in Functional Connectivity

Short Bio - I completed my Masters degree in Physics with Medical Physics at the University of Nottingham. I then joined the Oxford-Nottingham Biomedical Imaging (ONBI) doctoral training scheme and am currently a PhD student working with Matt Brookes and Karen Mullinger at the SPMIC. My research primarily focuses on extracting information from MEG data using Hidden Markov Models.

Abstract- The phenomenon of 'beta bursts' has recently gained a lot of interest within the field of MEG research. In my presentation I will describe a novel method for detecting bursts using hidden Markov modelling (HMM), followed by a characterisation of these bursts across the cortex in resting state. I will then go on to investigate the role of bursts in resting state functional connectivity.

 Title : George - Haemodynamics of the human placenta

 Bio - I completed my undergraduate degree in physics at the University of Nottingham. I am currently a 2nd year PhD student funded through the Oxford Nottingham Biomedical Imaging (ONBI) centre for doctoral training and I am working with Penny Gowland using MRI to investigate placental function.

Abstract - Placental circulation is critical in fetal development, yet the patterns of maternal flow inside the intervillous space and details of venous return remain largely unknown. Using phase contrast angiography to measure the velocity of bulk flow across the placenta, and diffusion weighting imaging to investigate the smaller scale incoherent movements within the IVS and vascular networks we are able to provide insight into human placental haemodynamics.