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Renelle McGlacken

PhD Student, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

In 2015 I received my BA in Sociology from the University of Lancaster and in 2016 gained my MSc in Sociology from the University of Amsterdam, where I specialised in Gender, Sexuality, and Culture. Using ethnographic methods that emphasise 'voice', embodied knowledges, and reflexivity, my BA and MSc theses explored women's experiences of mainstream nightclubs. Following my studies I worked as a research assistant in a local government research service. This involved supporting the evaluation of several large-scale public sector initiatives and undertaking both community and organisation-based research for local authorities across Lancashire.

Coming from an academic background of feminist Sociology, I am particularly interested in how boundaries are constructed and maintained between humans and other animals and how these are also often contested in the intersubjective relations we share together. I am passionate about the 'animal turn' in Sociology and, through acknowledging our multi-species entanglements, extending the social world beyond the human.

Research Summary

Renelle McGlacken is a PhD student at the School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Nottingham. Exploring how publics understand animal research in the UK, this PhD project is part of a… read more

Current Research

Renelle McGlacken is a PhD student at the School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Nottingham. Exploring how publics understand animal research in the UK, this PhD project is part of a Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award bringing together 5 UK universities under the programme 'The Animal Research Nexus: Changing Constitutions of Science, Health and Welfare'. With animal research remaining one of the most controversial issues in contemporary science, attempts to understand how publics make sense of the practice can work to facilitate much-needed dialogue between scientific communities and 'laypeople' and add context to the socioethical concerns that publics raise around the practice. With previous work around publics and animal research taking a largely quantitative approach, this PhD uses qualitative methods to capture the sociocultural contexts that inform technoscientific judgements and illustrate the diverse meanings that publics assign to animal research as an ethical, political, social, and scientific issue. Publics are accessed within this project through the Mass Observation Project, a data collection base which explores everyday life in Britain. Alongside the analysis of public opinion on animal research, this PhD project aims to critically assess the merit of the Mass Observation Project as an innovative qualitative method.

School of Sociology and Social Policy

Law and Social Sciences building
University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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