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Covid 19  – Exceptional Regulations 2019-2020

    Undergraduate (finalists)

    Undergraduate (progressing students)

     

    General Questions

     Last updated: 23 April 2020

    Why have changes been made to the Regulations?

    Due to COVID-19, the University has taken the decision not to run examinations in the summer exam period that require you to be on campus, and many other types of assessment are being altered.

    These changes require a set of Exceptional Regulations to be put into place.

    These Regulations will be used along with our existing regulations relating to assessment, progression and award.

     

    Who do the Regulations apply to?

    The Exceptional Regulations apply to all students who are being assessed or considered for progression or award on their programme of study in the summer of 2020.

     

     

    Extenuating Circumstances (EC's)

    Last updated: 23 April 2020

    Why are new EC regulations needed?

    These are unprecedented international circumstances. We know you may not be able to get evidence to support a COVID-19 related claim. However, we want to support you with the challenges you are facing while maintaining our high academic standards. 

     

    Do I need to provide evidence for my ECs claim?

    We know that you may not be able to get evidence to support the circumstances of your claim - for example, self-isolation. We will consider your account of the impact the circumstances have had on your performance.

    We may ask for evidence of travel or underlying health conditions if they are relevant to your case.

     

    When might an EC claim relating to COVID-19 be rejected?

    We may reject your claim if you decide not to attend teaching, supervision or other learning (physically or through digital means) where you are able to attend, and your decision isn’t based on advice published or recommended by the NHS or government websites, or because of reasonable concerns relating to your underlying health.

     

    I have ECs relating to travelling to my permanent home disrupting my study, can I put in an ECs claim or ask for an extension on outstanding work?

    Yes, you can put in an EC claim.

     

    My studies are being affected by extenuating circumstances but I’m unable to access medical or other support services and, in consequence,  I am unable to provide evidence in support of my claim.  What should I do?

    Please submit an EC claim and;

    1. Provide any evidence that you do have and that might bear on the case. For example, if you are experiencing an exacerbation of a health condition (mental or physical), any evidence that you have available to you of that health condition will help your School support your EC claim. 

    2. Give a detailed description of what has happened and how that has affected you.

     

     

    Revised Assessment

    Last updated: 23 April 2020

    I’ve heard that exams have been cancelled in May/June - does that mean I won’t have any more assessment this year?

    Face-to-face exams in May and June have been cancelled. Your module convenors are currently considering whether you will need to have further assessment. 

    If you are taking a Level 1 module and you have completed or will complete already set assessments worth 40% of the assessment or more, then your mark(s) will be treated as the final mark for your module on a ‘part for whole’ basis.

    If you have completed or will complete already set assessments worth less than 40% of the module, a substitute assessment will be set wherever possible.

    If you have completed or will complete already set assessments worth less than 40% of the module and a substitute assessment can’t be provided, the module outcome will be considered under the ‘Exceptional Regulations on Progression’ or ‘Exceptional Regulations on Classification’.

    If you are taking a Level 2, 3, or 4 module, where you have completed (or will complete) 40% of the assessment or more your School will consider whether further assessment should be set.

    Where further assessment isn’t essential to assessing programme-level learning outcomes because you have met those elsewhere, marks for completed assessment will be used as the module mark on a ‘part for whole’ basis.

    Where further assessment is essential to meet the programme-level learning outcomes, a substitute assessment will be set wherever possible.

    Where further assessment is essential to meet the programme-level learning outcomes and it isn’t practical to set a substitute assessment, your module outcome will be considered under the ‘Exceptional Regulations on Progression’ or ‘Exceptional Regulations on Classification’.

     

    How will I know if I am having a substitute assessment?

    The convenor for your module(s) will let you know what any further assessment will be.

     

    When will the deadline be for completing substitute assessment?

    The convenor for your module(s) will let you know the submission deadline for your work.

     

    I’ve been working on assignments that have already been set, and I can complete them and submit online, should I complete my assessment?

    Yes, you should complete and submit your work by the deadline(s) you have already been given.

     

    I have a big piece of work due – can I get an extension of time?

    If you need an extension of time to complete your work, you should request one via the Extenuating Circumstances Procedure.

     

    I have completed 40%* of the assessment for a module, why is my School using that mark as my module mark?

    In the circumstances, the University wants to avoid burdening students with assessments.

    Where we have 40%* of the assessment complete, the University can have confidence that it has a measure of how well a student satisfies the learning outcomes of the module. 

     

    I have completed 40%* of the assessment for a module, why is my School not asking me to complete the remaining assessment?

    If the University requires the completion of all assessment for a module, it will be placing a very significant burden on students at very difficult time. 

    Where we have 40%* of the assessment complete, the University can have confidence that it has a measure of how well a student satisfies the learning outcomes of the module. Because of that, we are not asking students to complete all assessment unless School's think it is essential to meeting the demands of the programme.

     

    I have completed 40%* of the assessment for a module. I understand that not everyone might want to, but I would like to take the remaining assessment. Why can't I?

    Where we have 40%* of the assessment complete, the University can have confidence that it has a measure of how well a student satisfies the learning outcomes of the module.

    If we allow some students to complete the remaining assessments, then we potentially advantage those students on a module who are less (psychologically and physically) impacted by COVID-19.

     

    I have completed 40%* of the assessment for a module. I understand that not everyone might want to, but I would like to take the remaining assessment because I think it would improve my grade. How will this be accounted for?

    The University will be issuing careful advice to exam boards to help them consider the impacts on students that may have occurred because of treating module marks part for whole. 

     

    My course has a Professional or Statutory Regulatory Body (PSRB) requirement, do these exceptional regulations apply?

    Courses with PSRB requirements may need to make more stringent arrangements after receiving advice from the relevant body.

    The exceptional regulations will be applied unless they are in conflict with PSRB requirements where the PSRB requirement will need to be met at the first available opportunity.

     

    Footnote:

    *70% UNM modules

     

    Revised Undergraduate Finalist Assessement

    Last updated: 1 May 2020

     

    Can you work through how you will work out my degree classification on CL7b?

    We’ll ask you to finish all of your modules that are still running (that haven’t been declared ‘Covid Incomplete’ or treated part for whole). If you pass them all, then we’ll use some of your marks from work you submitted before the impacts of Covid-19 to generate a classification. We’ll treat 15 March 2020 as that point.

    In this example, we assume you’re a third year UG on a three-year course taking semester long, 20 credit modules.

    First, we’ll need your weighted average from your previous stage. Let’s suppose that was 58.

    Second, we need to know what work you submitted in modules this stage, in level 3 modules, before 15 March 2020. For most full-time students, your stage is the academic year.

    Let’s suppose you submitted nothing this semester, but that in your three level 3 modules last semester you averaged 62. We can represent all of this as follows:

     

    Autumn Semester

    Spring Semester

    Part I

    55

    58

    52

    60

    62

    60

    Part II

    60

    62

    64

    x

    x

    x

     

    In this situation, you have completed 60 credits of assessment (A) this stage and level.

    A = 60.

    You have a weighted average this stage and level (B) of 62

    B=62.

    You have a weighted average from the previous stage (C) of 58.

    C=58

    So, to work out your safety net mark for the stage, we then calculate:

    lB + (1-l) C

    Where: l = min(2A, 120)/120

    You would get a safety net mark for the stage of 62.

    To work out a number for the purpose of classification, we use the normal weightings and let this stage count for 67% and last stage count for 33%.

    Safety net mark for this stage x 0.67 + Previous stage credit weighted average x 0.33 = 60.68.

    Thus, the number we will use for the purposes of classification is 60.6, since we truncate at one decimal place.

     

    And so, provided you passed your modules that are still in progress this semester, you can’t do worse than a 2:1. Of course, if your actual marks generate a better classification than a 2:1, then we’ll use your actual marks. 

     

    I’m a third year finalist and took a 20 credit level 2 module in the Autumn semester, completing a further 40 credits at level 3. I’ve not yet submitted any assessment this semester. How does this impact me?

    You have completed 40 credits of level 3 assessment this stage. In our calculations, we will exclude the 20 credits of non-level 3 modules from our calculation of B.

    We will include the 20 credits of modules taken at lower levels in our calculation of your credit weighted average in C.

     

    How do I work out a ‘Credit Weighted Average mark’? The term appears quite a lot.

    Let’s suppose that you have, in semester 1, completed one 40 credit module, M1, for which you got 65, and one 20 credit module, M2, for which you got 58. You have completed a total of 60 credits.

    Your credit weighted average for the semester will be equal to M1 mark x (40/60) + M2 mark x (20/60).

    Or, filling in those details: 65 x 0.67 + 58 x 0.33.

    In this case, then, your credit weighted average for the semester will be 62.6. 

     

    How do I work out a ‘Credit Weighted Average mark’ for a stage? 

    Suppose that, last stage, you completed modules securing the following marks with the following credit weightings.

    Module Mark

    Credit value of module

    60

    40

    58

    20

    61

    40

    63

    20

     

    We then calculate your credit weighted average for the stage: 40/120 x 60 + 20/120 x 58 + 40/120 x 61 + 20/120 x 63.

    That gives us a credit weighted average for the stage of 60.5.

     

    I am only taking year-long modules and have completed no assessments this academic year. How does this impact me?

    Because we have no marks for you from this year, we will use last year’s marks to determine your safety net mark for this stage, unless you are in your first (Qualifying) year of study. You will be given last stage’s weighted average mark as your safety net mark for this stage.

    Again, we think that it’s important to use the evidence available to us, but if we don’t have evidence from this year, then there is nothing from this year that we can use.

     

    I am only taking year-long modules but have completed some assessments this academic year, before March 15th. How does this impact me?

    Let’s suppose that last stage you secured a credit weighted stage average of 58. Let’s also suppose that you are taking 6 year-long, 20 credit modules, all of which are final year modules at a final year level (Level 4 for finalists in Part III, level 3 for finalists in Part II). In this example, we’ll assume you’re a fourth year on a four year course and are taking only level 4 modules. In each of those modules, you have completed 30% of the assessments.

    Your current marks are:

    Module 1

    Module 2

    Module 3

    Module 4

    Module 5

    Module 6

    62

    60

    63

    58

    55

    61

     

    We first need to know how many credits of assessment you have completed at this stage and level.

    In each 20 credit module, you have completed 30% if the assessment. So, for each module you have completed 20 x 0.3 credits of assessment. That is, 6 credits.

    We also need to know your weighted average for the credits of assessment you have completed at this stage and level.

    This is equal to 6/36 x M1 marks + 6/36 x M2 marks + 6/36 x M3 marks + 6/36 x M4 marks + 6/36 x M5 marks + 6/36 x M6 marks.

    Or: 6/36 x 62 + 6/36 x 60 + 6/36 x 63 + 6/36 x 58 + 6/36 x 55 + 6/36 x 61

    That’s 10.33 + 10 + 10.5 + 9.67 + 9.17 + 10.17

    So, in this case, your weighted average for the credits of assessment you have completed at this stage and level is 59.8.

    We can then use that information to calculate the safety net mark for the stage.

    In this situation, you have completed 36 credits of assessment (A) this stage and level.

    A = 36.

    You have a weighted average this stage and level (B) of 59.8

    B=59.8.

    You have a weighted average from the previous stage (C) of 58.

    C=58.

    So, to work out your safety net mark for the stage, we do:

    lB + (1-l) C

    Where: l = min(2A, 120)/120

    You would get a safety net mark for the stage of 59.1. We would use that number, in combination with work from your earlier stages, to generate a classification below which you cannot fall if you pass the modules that are still running. 

     

    My case is a bit more complicated. In semester 1 I completed three 20 credit modules, but one of those was a level 2 module. This semester I’ve already handed in work that counts for 12 assessed credits. I am a third year finalist. How does this impact me?

    Let’s suppose that your credit weighted average for the last stage is 55. Then let’s suppose that this represents your performance in semester 1.

    Level of Module

    Mark

    3

    61

    3

    61

    2

    64

     

    This semester, let’s suppose that the 12 assessed credits are made up of marks awarded on two modules. All modules this semester are worth 20 credits and so on each module this semester 30% of the assessment has been completed. In both you got marks of 63.

    We first need to calculate the number of assessed credits this stage, in level 3 modules, before 15 March 15 2020.

    In this case, you have completed 52 assessed credits this stage, in level 3 modules, before 15 March 15 2020.

    We then need to work out your weighted average mark for those 42 assessed credits. That is: 61 x 20/46 + 61 x 20/46 + 63 x 6/46 + 63 x 6/46

    So, the credit weighted average for the assessed credits this stage, in level 3 modules, before 15 March 2020 is 61.4.

    Finally, we need to calculate your credit-weighted average from your assessments that you have completed before 15th March 2020 at your previous academic levels in this stage, and at any level in your previous stage. We already have your credit weighted average from the previous stage. That’s 55. But we also have 20 credits of assessed credits from your previous level (level 2) this stage.

    To calculate credit-weighted average from your assessments that you have completed before 15 March 2020 at your previous academic levels in this stage, and at any level in your previous stage, we therefore need to calculate 55 x 120/140 + 64 x 20/140. That is, 56.1.

    We then have all of the values necessary to calculate your safety net mark for the stage.

    In this situation, you have completed 40 credits of assessment (A) this stage and level.

    A = 40.

    You have a weighted average this stage and level (B) of 61

    B=62.

    You have a weighted average from your assessments that you have completed before 15 March 2020 at your previous academic levels in this stage, and at any level in your previous stage (C) of 56.1.

    So, to work out your safety net mark for the stage, we do:

    lB + (1-l) C

    Where: l = min(2A, 120)/120

    You would get a safety net mark for the stage of 59.3. We would use that number, in combination with work from your earlier stages, to generate a classification below which you cannot fall if you pass the modules that are still running.

     

    I am an integrated Masters student in my final year. What evidence will you use to calculate my safety net mark for this stage?

    To calculate substitute marks for any finalist, we will use the process described here. This is to ensure that we have parity of treatment for students. 

     

    I am a level 3 finalist and have taken a level 4 module this stage.  Do my level 4 modules count towards my safety net for this stage?

    Yes they do.

     

    How do I work out the average that I have so far for this stage?

    You can’t work out your Part II average for this stage, you can only estimate it. At this point, none of the marks from this stage have been confirmed by an exam board and may, in response to feedback from our External Examiners, go up or down a little.

    This happens every year and is an important part of our Quality Assurance process where we use examiners from other institutions to make sure that our marking is appropriate. 

     

    I’ve consistently achieved 2:1 marks throughout my time at University and my safety net is a 2:1. How will this impact me?

    So long as you pass any modules still running, you will get a 2:1.

     

    I’ve consistently achieved 1sts throughout my time at University and my safety net is a 1st. How will this impact me?

    So long as you pass any modules still running, you will get a 1st.

     

    One of my modules has stopped being assessed (the School have said they can’t assess it and it’s ‘Covid Incomplete’). How does the second classification option impact me?

    When classifying you by generating a safety net mark for this stage, you do not have to pass a module that has been designated ‘Covid Incomplete’. 

     

    One of my modules has stopped being assessed (the School have said they will treat it ‘part for whole’). How does the second classification option impact me?

    When classifying you by generating a safety net mark for this stage, you do not have to pass a module that has been treated ‘part for whole’.

     

    How did you settle on this option?

    We came to this option through a careful analysis of positions taken by other Universities (you will see elements in common), careful thought about how to avoid disadvantaging our students, careful scrutiny of other parts of our classification model, and a great deal of scenario modelling.

     

    Other Universities are able to calculate their equivalent of a stage safety net. Why can’t you?

    There are two reasons why we cannot calculate this number for you. First, not all work that was submitted before 15 March 2020 has been marked, returned, and the marks entered into the system. That means we don’t yet have the data we would need.

    We are trying to use as much data as we can about your performance to date, including work already submitted this semester. This makes our approach more representative of your ability, but prevents us from telling you in advance what the safety net mark will be.

    Second, until marks are approved at an exam board, and verified by an External Examiner, the marks are not definitive. They can change. If they can still change, we cannot calculate a reliable safety net mark for the stage. 

     

    How can I estimate my safety net mark for the stage?

    Work out the number of credits of assessment completed this stage. That is A.

    Work out your Credit-weighted mean mark for the assessments taken this stage at current academic level (level 3 for finalists on a 3yr degree), and submitted before 15 March 2020. That is B.

    Work out your Credit-weighted mean from assessments completed before 15 March 2020 at previous academic levels in this stage, and at any level in previous stage. That is C.

    Then:

    Safety net mark for the stage = lB + (1-l) C

    Where: l = min(2A, 120)/120

     

    How many credits of assessment have I completed this stage and level?

    Add up all of the credits of modules you are taking this stage.

    If you are a third-year finalist, find out which of these modules are level 3 modules.

    If you are a fourth-year finalist, find out which of these modules are level 4 modules.

    These are modules you have taking this stage and level.

    On any such module, each assessment you have completed by 15 March 2020 will count for a proportion of the module.  Multiply the number of credits the module is worth by the proportion the assessment is worth. (100% of the assessment on a 20 credit module will count for 20 credits of assessment; 50% of the assessment on a 20 credit module will count for 10 credits of assessment; 20% of the assessment on a 20 credit module will count for 4 credits of assessment, and so on).

    Add all of these together. That is the number of credits of assessment you have completed this stage and at this level.

    Consider two examples.

    Example 1: Suppose you are a third year UG student and have completed 40 credits of level 3 modules and 20 credits of level 2 modules in semester 1. You have also completed 20% of the assessment on two 20 credit level 3 modules in semester 2.

    The 40 credits of level 3 modules you completed in semester 1 are modules you have completed this module and stage.

    You have also completed credits at this level and stage in semester 2. You have completed 20% of the assessment on two 20 credit level 3 modules. That is: 0.2 x 20 + 0.2 x 20. That’s 8 credits.  So, altogether you have completed 48 credits of assessment at this stage and level.

    Example 2: Suppose you are a 4th year UG student taking a mix of year long and semester long modules. You competed one 20 credit level 3 module in semester 1. Your other modules are all at level 4. You are taking 4 20 credit year-long modules, and for each have completed assessment worth 30% of the modules. You have also completed 20% of the assessment on your remaining 20 credit, semester 2 module.

    We can represent this:

     

    Module credit

    % of Assessment complete

    Level

    Module 1

    20

    100

    3

    Module 2

    20

    30

    4

    Module 3

    20

    30

    4

    Module 4

    20

    30

    4

    Module 5

    20

    30

    4

    Module 6

    20

    20

    4

     

    We can calculate your completed credits of assessment at this stage and level.

    1 x 20 + 0.3 x 20 + 0.3 x 20 + 0.3 x 20 + 0.3 x 20 + 0.2 x 20.

    In this case, you have completed 48 credits of assessment at this stage and level.

     

    I was due to submit a piece of work this stage and level before 15 March 2020, but, because of ECs, I did not. How will this impact me? Will I get 0 for that piece of work?

    You will not get 0 for that piece of work. The piece of work will be excluded from the calculation of your safety net mark for the stage.

     

    I had a submission deadline after 15 March 2020 but submitted early, will the mark for this work be included in my safety net?

    The marks included in the safety net are for work with a submission deadline on or before the 15 March 2020.

     

     

     

    Revised Undergraduate Non-Final Assessment

    Last updated 1 May 2020

    These FAQs set out to answer questions not directly covered in the document ‘Progression, and classification in subsequent years’.

    How do I work out a ‘Credit Weighted Average mark’? The term appears quite a lot.

    Let’s suppose that you have, in semester 1, completed one 40 credit module, M1, for which you got 65, and one 20 credit module, M2, for which you got 58. You have completed a total of 60 credits. 

    Your credit weighted average for the semester will be equal to M1 mark x (40/60) + M2 mark x (20/60).

    Or, filling in those details: 65 x 40/60 + 58 x 20/60.

    In this case, then, your credit weighted average for the semester will be 62.6. 

     

    How do I work out a ‘Credit Weighted Average mark’ for a stage? 

    Suppose that, last stage, you completed modules securing the following marks with the following credit weightings.

    Module Mark

    Credit value of module

    60

    40

    58

    20

    61

    40

    63

    20

     

    We then calculate your credit weighted average for the stage: 40/120 x 60 + 20/120 x 58 + 40/120 x 61 + 20/120 x 63.

    That gives us a credit weighted average for the stage of 60.5.

     

    I am in Qualifying year. How will you work out my safety net mark for the stage?

    If you have completed 60 credits of assessment before 15 March 2020, then we will use the weighted average of the credits of assessment completed before 15 March 2020 as the safety net mark for the stage.

    If you have completed between 20 and 59 credits of assessment before 15 March 2020, then we will use the weighted average of the credits of assessment completed before 15 March 2020 as the provisional safety net mark for the stage. If your provisional safety net mark for the stage is either of 2 degree classes or 15 marks higher than the actual stage average, exam boards are asked to not use it.

    If you have completed less than 19 credits of assessment from this stage and level, and before 15 March 2020, we cannot generate a provisional safety net mark for the stage and so cannot offer progression through UGPR7b. If you are in this position you will be given marks as usual. Your School will consider your case.

     

    I am in my 2nd year and my first year doesn’t count towards my final degree classification. How will you work out my safety net for the stage? 

    If you have completed 60 credits of assessment before 15 March 2020, then we will use the weighted average of the credits of assessment completed before 15 March 2020 as the safety net mark for the stage.

    If you have completed between 20 and 59 credits of assessment before 15 March 2020, then we will use the weighted average of the credits of assessment completed before 15 March 2020 as the provisional safety net mark for the stage. If your provisional safety net mark for the stage is either of 2 degree classes or 15 marks higher than the actual stage average, exam boards are asked to not use it.

    If you have completed less than 19 credits of assessment from this stage and level, and before 15 March 2020, we cannot generate a provisional safety net mark for the stage and so cannot offer progression through UGPR7b. If you are in this position you will be given marks as usual. Your School will consider your case.

     

    I have completed a stage that counts towards my final degree classification. How will you work out my safety net for the stage?

    The formula we will use to calculate the safety net mark for the stage for all students who have already completed a stage that counts towards their degree,has three variables:

    A.    The credit-value of the assessments that you have taken this stage at your current academic level (example: level 3 modules taken this stage for finalists on a 3yr degree), and submitted before 15 March 2020.

    B.    Your credit-weighted mean mark for the assessments that you have taken this stage at your current academic level (example: level 3 modules for finalists on a 3yr degree), and submitted before 15 March 2020.

    C.   Your credit-weighted mean from your assessments that you have completed before 15 March 2020 at your previous academic levels in this stage, and at any level in your previous stage.

    The proper formulation of the safety net mark for the stageis:

    Safety net mark for the stage= lB + (1-l) C

    Where: l = min(2A, 120)/120

    We can illustrate with an example in which we take you to be a third year (Part II) student on a four year degree.

    In this example, we assume you’re taking semester long, 20 credit modules.

    First, we’ll need your weighted average from your previous stage. Let’s suppose that was 58.

    Second, we need to know what work you submitted in modules this stage, in level 3 modules, before 15 March 2020. For most full-time students, your stage is the academic year.

    Let’s suppose you submitted nothing this semester, but that in your three level 3 modules last semester you averaged 62. We can represent all of this as follows:

     

    Autumn Semester

    Spring Semester

    Part I

    55

    58

    52

    60

    62

    60

    Part II

    60

    62

    64

    x

    x

    x

     

    In this situation, you have completed 60 credits of assessment (A) this stage and level.

    A = 60.

    You have a weighted average this stage and level (B) of 62

    B=62.

    You have a weighted average from the previous stage (C) of 58.

    C=58

    So, to work out your safety net mark for the stage, we then calculate:

    lB + (1-l) C

    Where: l = min(2A, 120)/120

    You would get a safety net mark for the stage of 62.

     

    I am a level 2 student who has taken a level 3 module this stage.  Do my level 3 modules count towards my safety net mark for this stage?

    Yes they do.

     

    I have completed a stage that counts towards my final degree classification and am taking year long modules. How will you work out my safety net for the stage?

    The formula we will use to calculate the safety net mark for the stage for all students who have already completed a stage that counts towards their degree,has three variables:

    A.    The credit-value of the assessments that you have taken this stage at your current academic level (example: level 3 modules taken this stage for finalists on a 3yr degree), and submitted before 15 March 2020.

    B.    Your credit-weighted mean mark for the assessments that you have taken this stage at your current academic level (example: level 3 modules for finalists on a 3yr degree), and submitted before 15 March 2020.

    C.   Your credit-weighted mean from your assessments that you have completed before 15 March 2020 at your previous academic levels in this stage, and at any level in your previous stage.

    The proper formulation of the safety net mark for the stageis:

    Safety net mark for the stage= lB + (1-l) C

    Where: l = min(2A, 120)/120

    To illustrate, let’s suppose that last stage you secured a credit weighted stage average of 58. Let’s also suppose that you are taking 6 year-long, 20 credit modules, all of which are third year modules in Part II. In each of those modules, you have completed 30% of the assessments. Your current marks are:

    Module 1

    Module 2

    Module 3

    Module 4

    Module 5

    Module 6

    62

    60

    63

    58

    55

    61

     

    We first need to know how many credits of assessment you have completed at this stage and level.

    In each 20 credit module, you have completed 30% if the assessment. So, for each module you have completed 20 x 0.3 credits of assessment. That is, 6 credits.

    We also need to know your weighted average for the credits of assessment you have completed at this stage and level.

    This is equal to 6/36 x M1 marks + 6/36 x M2 marks + 6/36 x M3 marks + 6/36 x M4 marks + 6/36 x M5 marks + 6/36 x M6 marks.

    Or: 6/36 x 62 + 6/36 x 60 + 6/36 x 63 + 6/36 x 58 + 6/36 x 55 + 6/36 x 61

    That’s 10.33 + 10 + 10.5 + 9.67 + 9.17 + 10.17

    So, in this case, your weighted average for the credits of assessment you have completed at this stage and level is 59.84.

    We can then use that information to calculate the safety net mark for the stage.

    In this situation, you have completed 36 credits of assessment (A) this stage and level.

    A = 36.

    You have a weighted average this stage and level (B) of 59.8

    B=59.8.

    You have a weighted average from the previous stage (C) of 58.

    C=58

    So, to work out your safety net mark for the stage, we do:

    lB + (1-l) C

    Where: l = min(2A, 120)/120

    You would get a safety net mark for the stage of 59.1.

     

    Other Universities are able to calculate their equivalent of a stage safety net. Why can’t you?

    There are two reasons why we cannot calculate this number for you. First, not all work that was submitted before 15 March 2020 has been marked, returned, and the marks entered into the system. That means we don’t yet have the data we would need.

    We are trying to use as much data as we can about your performance to date, including work already submitted this semester. This makes our approach more representative of your ability, but prevents us from telling you in advance what the safety net mark will be.

    Second, until marks are approved at an exam board, and verified by an External Examiner, the marks are not definitive. They can change. If they can still change, we cannot calculate a reliable safety net mark for the stage. 

     

    How do I work out the average that I have so far for this stage?

    You can’t work out your average for this stage, you can only estimate it. At this point, none of the marks from this stage have been confirmed by an exam board and may, in response to feedback from our External Examiners, go up or down a little.

    This happens every year and is an important part of our Quality Assurance process where we use examiners from other institutions to make sure that our marking is appropriate. 

     

    My marks for this year were supposed to feed in to how I’m classified in future years. How will that work with the safety net?

    We will use whichever of your achieved marks and your safety net mark for the stage is higher for the purposes of future classification decisions

     

    How many credits of assessment have I completed at this stage and level?

    Add up all of the credits of modules you are taking this stage.

    If you are a third-year non-finalist, find out which of these modules are level 3 modules. (If you are a second year non-finalist, this will be level 2 modules, etc.).

    These are modules you have taking this stage and level.

    On any such module, each assessment you have completed by 15 March 2020 will count for a proportion of the module.  Multiply the number of credits the module is worth by the proportion the assessment is worth. (100% of the assessment on a 20 credit module will count for 20 credits of assessment; 50% of the assessment on a 20 credit module will count for 10 credits of assessment; 20% of the assessment on a 20 credit module will count for 4 credits of assessment, and so on). Add all of these together. That is the number of credits of assessment you have completed this stage and at this level.

    Consider two examples.

    Example 1: Suppose you are a third year UG student and have completed 40 credits of level 3 modules and 20 credits of level 2 modules in semester 1. You have also completed 20% of the assessment on two 20 credit level 3 modules in semester 2.

    The 40 credits of level 3 modules you completed in semester 1 are modules you have completed this module and stage.

    You have also completed credits at this level and stage in semester 2. You have completed 20% of the assessment on two 20 credit level 3 modules. That is: 0.2 x 20 + 0.2 x 20. That’s 8 credits.  So, altogether you have completed 48 credits of assessment at this stage and level.

    Example 2: Suppose you are a 4th year UG student taking a mix of year long and semester long modules. You competed one 20 credit level 3 module in semester 1. Your other modules are all at level 4. You are taking 4 20 credit year-long modules, and for each have completed assessment worth 30% of the modules. You have also completed 20% of the assessment on your remaining 20 credit, semester 2 module.

    We can represent this:

     

    Module credit

    % of Assessment complete

    Level

    Module 1

    20

    100

    3

    Module 2

    20

    30

    4

    Module 3

    20

    30

    4

    Module 4

    20

    30

    4

    Module 5

    20

    30

    4

    Module 6

    20

    20

    4

     

    We can calculate your completed credits of assessment at this stage and level.

    1 x 20 + 0.3 x 20 + 0.3 x 20 + 0.3 x 20 + 0.3 x 20 + 0.2 x 20.

    In this case, you have completed 48 credits of assessment at this stage and level.

     

    I had a submission deadline after 15 March 2020 but submitted early, will the mark for this work be included in my safety net?

    The marks included in the safety net are for work with a submission deadline on or before the 15 March 2020.

     

     

    Revised PGT Assessement

    Last updated: 12 May 2020

    What is included under 'assessment' here?

    By 'assessment' we mean any piece of work for which you might be awarded a mark that would contribute to your degree.

     

    Other universities are using a different way of classifying students. Why is that?

    Other universities already use slightly different ways to classify students (especially when it comes to borderline algorithms) and will, as a consequence, have a series of slightly different practices in place to make sure that a degree from one university has parity with that from another.

    Because of that, there will be small amounts of divergence in how universities need to support students this year, and you should expect to see that reflected in the steps taken by those universities. 

     

    I am taking year-long modules. How does this impact me?

    As we are focusing on completed assessments, not completed modules, the impact is the same. 

     

    I am a part-time student in the second year of my degree. How does this impact me?

    We will treat you exactly the same as a full-time student, and calculate your weighted average based on all the taught module assessments you completed before Sunday 15 March 2020, including those that you completed last year.

     

    How do I work out the average that I have so far?

    You can’t work out your average from semester 1, you can only estimate it. At this point, none of the marks have been confirmed by an exam board and may, in response to feedback from our external examiners, go up or down a little.

    This happens every year and is an important part of our quality assurance process where we use examiners from other institutions to make sure that our marking is appropriate. 

     

    I’ve consistently achieved Distinctions in the taught modules for my masters’ programme. How will this impact me?

    So long as you pass any remaining modules, you will get a Distinction for the taught elements.

    However, if you also need to complete a 60-credit Dissertation/Project as part of your degree, this will not be included in these calculations, and can affect your final degree result.

     

    I am undertaking a 60-credit PGCert or 120-credit PGDip award. How will these regulations affect me?

    The exceptional assessment regulations apply to taught modules that are considered by the summer exam board in 2020.  For PGCert and PG Dip students, these taught modules will comprise all your credits.

     

    Why is my 60-credit Dissertation/Project not included in the calculation of my weighted average?

    The exceptional assessment regulations that were circulated at the end of March apply to the taught modules that are considered by the summer exam boards. The 60-credit Dissertation/Project, which most students complete by the end of summer, is considered by a separate exam board that meets in Autumn.

    This also counts towards one-third of the standard 180-credit masters’ degree, and is considered by both employers and PhD programmes to be the most significant component of that degree.

    Therefore, we do not feel that we can award masters degrees where this component has been substituted by a weighted average from your taught modules. However, we would like to give you the best chance possible of completing your best work in the project/dissertation.

     

    How is the University supporting me to complete my Masters’ Dissertation/Project?

    There are many different types of 60-credit Dissertation/Project across the disciplines within the University. Many students will be able to complete the project they originally planned with a few small adjustments for working remotely. Many will be guided by their supervisors to adjust a project that would normally rely on lab work or data collection on campus, so that it can be completed remotely through a shift in focus and type of evidence.

    A small number of you may not be able to complete your project at all because it is completely dependent on work carried out using specialist facilities and resources on campus. We want those of you who are able to complete your project and finish your studies by the end of year to do so.

    We are committed to making whatever adjustments we can to support successful completion of the project stage of your degree, but this will be achieved in different ways from those applied to your taught modules.

     

    How did you settle on this option?

    We came to this option through a careful analysis of positions taken by other Russell Group universities (you will see elements in common), careful thought about how to avoid disadvantaging our students, careful scrutiny of other parts of our classification model, and lots of scenario modelling.

     

    I had a submission deadline after 15 March 2020 but submitted early, will the mark for this work be included in my safety net?

    The marks included in the safety net are for work with a submission deadline on or before the 15 March 2020.

     

     

    Progression

    Last updated 23 April 2020

    Can I progress to the next year of my programme for the 2020-2021 academic year?

    Your progression status will be considered and an adjustment may need to be made for any COVID-19-incomplete modules.

    If you successfully pass everything or progress following the application of one of the compensation regulations and there is no PSRB requirement which needs to be met, you will progress to the next year of your programme.

     

    What is a COVID-19-incomplete module?

    A COVID-19-incomplete module is one where - because of the cancelling of assessment - a module is missing marks, and neither ‘part for whole’ or substitute assessment is available.

     

    What happens with COVID-19-incomplete modules?

    Up to 40 credits of COVID-19-incomplete modules can be ignored.  

    This may include non-compensable modules.  Your School will consider your progression status at the end of academic year Exam Board.

     

    What happens if I have more than 40 credits of COVID-19-incomplete modules?

    If you have more than 40 credits of COVID-19-incomplete modules, a case will need to be put to the Quality and Standards Committee to determine progression.

     

    What happens if after applying the exceptional regulations I can’t progress?

    If you haven’t progressed and your module failure is because of the use of the exceptional regulations, you will be offered a new attempt at assessment at the first available opportunity.  

     

    What happens if my course has a Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body (PSRB) requirement?

    Courses with PSRB requirements may need to make more stringent arrangements, after receiving guidance from the relevant Body. PSRB requirements will, in all cases, be in addition to the exceptional regulations.

    This may mean that you aren’t able to progress to the next year of your course until you have met those requirements. You will be assessed at the first available opportunity.

     

     

    Award

    Last updated 23 April 2020

    Will I get my Award this year?

    Students who successfully meet the exceptional regulations for classification (or existing regulations) will receive their awards in July 2020.

    Unfortunately, graduation ceremonies will not take place this summer, but special ceremonies will be arranged at a later date.

    Your award will be confirmed as usual and you will have documentation to support employment or applications for further study.

     

    Will my Award be valid and recognised by employers?

    Your Award will be made by the University of Nottingham under either our existing or exceptional regulations and will be a valid award from the University.

     

    If I haven’t taken all of my assessment how can I get an Award?

    The exceptional regulations for classification allow us to discount up to 40 credits of COVID-19-incomplete modules from your overall award calculation. This is in addition to the existing regulation which allows for up to 20 credits of module marks to be discounted because of an upheld EC claim.  

    Where you have COVID-19-incomplete modules, your classification will be decided by a weighted average of the remaining marks from your final year and the relevant weighted averages from Part I (and in the case of four year programmes Part II).

    Where you have been classified carrying COVID-19-incomplete modules you will be given an opportunity of a first-sit at the first available opportunity.

     

    What happens if I am in a borderline?

    The University’s award borderline criteria will be applied on a pro-rata basis after COVID-19-incomplete modules have been discounted.

     

    What happens if I have more than 40 credits of COVID-19-incomplete modules?

    If these are the only modules where you have fail or missing marks, you will be offered an Unclassified Honours degree in July 2020 and will have the option of a first attempt in the COVID-19-incomplete modules at the first opportunity.

     

    What happens if I have failed other modules in my final year?

    Depending on the circumstances you will be offered a first sit or - if the failure isn’t related to COVID-19 or other ECs - your School will consider reassessment opportunities which may be available to you.

     

    What happens if my course has a Professional, statutory or Regulatory Body (PSRB) requirement? 

    Courses with PSRB requirements may need to make more stringent arrangements, after receiving guidance from the relevant Body.  

    PSRB requirements will, in all cases, be in addition to the exceptional regulations.  This may mean that you aren’t able to qualify for an accredited award until you have met those requirements.

    You will be offered an unaccredited or unclassified honours degree initially and you will be assessed at the first available opportunity for an accredited award.